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Revised OGEL for PCBs and other low-risk components

A revision to the OGEL for printed circuit boards (PCBs) and components for military goods has just been published which includes a long list of ‘low-risk items that may now be exported using this OGEL. This represents another milestone in techUK’s efforts to simply the Export System for ‘low-risk’ exports since we started working with the Government in 2014.

This revised OGEL replaces the Schedule 1 to the OGEL for printed circuit boards (PCBs) and components for military goods. The licence was published on 1 March 2017. However, to give exporters time to absorb the changes, it did not come into force until 8 March 2017. All PCB manufacturers and exporters of ‘low-risk’ components, including mechanical fixtures, should check the new schedule and take appropriate action. Please refer to the published OGEL and the notice to exporters.

The new schedule includes a range of utility electronic and electrical components used in Military equipment that previously needed a SIEL or OIEL for export, including wire, cable looms and harnesses, connectors, insulators, fasteners, switches, solenoids, inductors, transformers, capacitors, resistors, gauges, batteries, EMI/RFI gaskets. The list also includes wide range of mechanical parts including ‘Windshield washer and wiper assemblies’. In fact, if your utility parts are not included in the list, it would be worthwhile approaching Export Control to get them added in a future revision.

This revised OGEL means that a long list of items that are made in the UK to a Military drawing or specification can now be shipped immediately after registering to use this OGEL and without the need of an End User Undertaking. This will prove to be extremely useful to UK companies exporting these products around the world as well as reducing the administrative burden for both industry and Government.

One word of caution – you still need to check the application that these parts will be used in when exporting so that you can correctly classify the goods and ensure that they are covered by the ML categories listed in this OGEL. If you are not sure, you should contact Export Control for advice.

Lastly, the OGEL also lists ‘Technology specified in ML22 for the development, production or use of any goods in this Schedule’. As you will be aware, any information about the technology used for these components is also subject to export control and any technical information exported by Electronic means, e.g. specifications sent to overseas subcontractors, is also restricted. However, This OGEL makes the licencing and reporting relatively straightforward.

 

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