techUK - Representing the tech industry in the UK techUK provides a collective voice for its members and drives connections with government and business to create a commercial environment in which they can thrive. http://www.techuk.org/ 2018-05-25T05:43:29+01:00 Joomla! - Open Source Content Management The Spectrum behind the success of the Royal Wedding 2018-05-24T17:57:34+01:00 2018-05-24T17:57:34+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13215-the-spectrum-behind-the-success-of-the-royal-wedding CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><strong>Imagine if the mics had squealed with feedback, or the live footage of The Kiss had cut out.</strong> Spectrum -&nbsp;essential for the use of&nbsp;wireless communications&nbsp;- is so intrinsically interwoven into everyday life and events that likely the only reason people would be talking about it is if something had gone disastrously wrong.</p> <p>A lot of planning and coordination went into the Royal Wedding and the events around it,&nbsp;and wireless communications would likely have played a key role in the day. &nbsp;For the wedding itself, security on the day, media and broadcasting, and the spectators in Windsor and those discussing it online &ndash; the Royal Wedding was the <a href="https://twitter.com/Ofcom/status/998511271136948224">largest number of spectrum users gathered in one open area&nbsp;in the UK since the London 2012 Olympic Games</a>.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s worth taking a few minutes to look behind the scenes and explore the wireless communications that would have made&nbsp;it possible more than <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/tonifitzgerald/2018/05/21/royal-wedding-ratings-how-many-people-watched-prince-harry-wed-meghan-markle/#34b8b15755c6">53 million</a>&nbsp;people to tune in to hear &ldquo;I will&rdquo; - and enable&nbsp;the Royal Wedding to be a success:</p> <p><strong>Wedding</strong><br> Some of the uses of wireless connectivity in the wedding were more evident than others &ndash; sharp-eyed viewers would have spotted lapel-mics attached to Bishop Michael Curry&rsquo;s robes during his fiery wedding address, and on the robes of the Archbishop of Canterbury as he proclaimed the couple husband and wife.</p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/Ofcom/status/998511271136948224"><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Royal%20Wedding.JPG" style="float:right; height:347px; width:400px"></a>Wireless microphones and walkie-talkies would have also been used behind the scenes of the event, from management staff, First Aid, Catering, Crowd marshals, Traffic marshals, Car parking and the crowd interviews (vox pop) by media. For these uses&nbsp;the organisers would have had to apply for a&nbsp;'Programme making and special events' (<a href="https://www.ofcom.org.uk/manage-your-licence/radiocommunication-licences/pmse">PMSE</a>) licence.</p> <p>Even though Ofcom carefully manages the PMSE licenses, licence exempt and shared frequencies may sometimes have interference. Interference can be caused from other users on the same frequency as well as other sources such as lights, computers, atmospheric conditions and illegal users. Normal procedures are for users who are suffering interference to contact Ofcom as soon as possible to offer technical support to help resolve the issue. However, for this event members of Ofcom&rsquo;s spectrum assurance team were there on hand to deal with interference issues.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Security</strong><br> With such a public event that had many high-profile people in attendance, security on the day would have been paramount. The police and any emergency services on hand would have been equipped with Airwave system technology. Airwave is mainly limited to voice radio, however this system will soon be phased over to the new <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-emergency-services-mobile-communications-programme/emergency-services-network">emergency services network</a> (ESN) to all police, fire, ambulance and other public safety users across the UK. The ESN is to have secure and resilient voice communication and broadband data services and the Emergency Services Mobile Communications Programme (ESMCP) will deliver the new network and devices.</p> <p><strong>Media</strong><br> The wedding was viewed live by people at home, in community centers and at &ldquo;watch parties&rdquo; through broadcast, satellite, cable or IP TV in the UK and internationally. &nbsp;Almost 24 million people in the UK watched the wedding, with about 29 million people watching the wedding in the <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/tonifitzgerald/2018/05/21/royal-wedding-ratings-how-many-people-watched-prince-harry-wed-meghan-markle/#34b8b15755c6">USA across 15 different broadcast and cable networks</a>, and the numbers for online streaming haven&rsquo;t yet been released.&nbsp;Interestingly, Sky was the first broadcaster to televise the wedding in 4K and had to <a href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/05/19/royal-wedding-facts-figures-many-people-invited-cost-windsor/">lay out 27km of cables to broadcast the wedding in UHD</a>.</p> <p>Whilst drones are increasingly used for filming, there was a <a href="http://www.thamesvalley.police.uk/news/general/policing-royal-wedding-restriction-flying-regulation/">ban on the use of drones</a> at the wedding. A flight restriction was placed around Windsor which was aimed to stop people flying aircrafts below 2,500 ft (not interfering with the Heathrow flight path)&nbsp;therefore all the&nbsp;footage on the day would have been done by shoulder-mounted, fixed or camera cranes.</p> <p><strong>Spectators&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong><br><a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-44179982"><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Crowd%20reacts%20to%20the%20kiss%20-%20BBC.JPG" style="float:right; height:268px; margin:5px; width:400px"></a>People watched the wedding as lucky guests in St George's Chapel, in the grounds of Windsor Castle, lined along the town and Long Walk, or through the TV or livestreaming. Apart from the guests in the chapel, almost all of those who were there on the day were taking photos or videos with their phones and sharing them online. Over 3.4 million social media users tweeted about the royal wedding during the ceremony, Bishop Curry's&nbsp;address&nbsp;<a href="https://www.eonline.com/uk/news/937523/10-stats-about-prince-harry-and-meghan-markle-s-wedding-that-may-surprise-you">generated 40,000 tweets per minute</a>, and the proclamation that the couple were husband and produced 27,000 tweets per minute.</p> <p>To ensure that the mobile networks in Windsor were able to deal with the high-demand, the operators could have used a &lsquo;pump-up&rsquo; <a href="https://www.smc-comms.com/mobile-portable-cellular-tower-images/">portable base station</a> or <a href="https://www.ft.com/content/9c16b23c-f80f-11e6-9516-2d969e0d3b65">&ldquo;air mast&rdquo; technology with balloons and drones</a> - though these are mainly used in areas where there is little existing infrastructure either in emergency situations such as floods or earthquakes, or&nbsp;due to rural or remote locations such as Glastonbury. However, it&rsquo;s likely that the network operator&rsquo;s solution involved a mixture of utilising the existing infrastructure in Windsor (light up base stations) and drawing on their experience developed for the London 2012 Olympics to increase network capacity for the day.</p> <hr><p>More information is available about techUK&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.techuk.org/focus/programmes/communications-infrastructure">Communications Infrastructure Programme </a>and <a href="http://www.techuk.org/about/uk-spectrum-policy-forum">UK Spectrum Policy Forum</a>.</p> <p>Some events that may be of interest:</p> <ul><li><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/conference/item/12793-drone-futures-how-the-uk-can-lead-from-the-front">Drone Futures: How the UK Can Lead from the Front</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/conference/item/12895-ses-2018-ultra-hd-conference">SES 2018 Ultra HD Conference</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/meeting/item/12631-uk-spectrum-policy-forum-spectrum-resilience">UK Spectrum Policy Forum - Spectrum Resilience</a></li> </ul>{bio}skye.macleod@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><strong>Imagine if the mics had squealed with feedback, or the live footage of The Kiss had cut out.</strong> Spectrum -&nbsp;essential for the use of&nbsp;wireless communications&nbsp;- is so intrinsically interwoven into everyday life and events that likely the only reason people would be talking about it is if something had gone disastrously wrong.</p> <p>A lot of planning and coordination went into the Royal Wedding and the events around it,&nbsp;and wireless communications would likely have played a key role in the day. &nbsp;For the wedding itself, security on the day, media and broadcasting, and the spectators in Windsor and those discussing it online &ndash; the Royal Wedding was the <a href="https://twitter.com/Ofcom/status/998511271136948224">largest number of spectrum users gathered in one open area&nbsp;in the UK since the London 2012 Olympic Games</a>.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s worth taking a few minutes to look behind the scenes and explore the wireless communications that would have made&nbsp;it possible more than <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/tonifitzgerald/2018/05/21/royal-wedding-ratings-how-many-people-watched-prince-harry-wed-meghan-markle/#34b8b15755c6">53 million</a>&nbsp;people to tune in to hear &ldquo;I will&rdquo; - and enable&nbsp;the Royal Wedding to be a success:</p> <p><strong>Wedding</strong><br> Some of the uses of wireless connectivity in the wedding were more evident than others &ndash; sharp-eyed viewers would have spotted lapel-mics attached to Bishop Michael Curry&rsquo;s robes during his fiery wedding address, and on the robes of the Archbishop of Canterbury as he proclaimed the couple husband and wife.</p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/Ofcom/status/998511271136948224"><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Royal%20Wedding.JPG" style="float:right; height:347px; width:400px"></a>Wireless microphones and walkie-talkies would have also been used behind the scenes of the event, from management staff, First Aid, Catering, Crowd marshals, Traffic marshals, Car parking and the crowd interviews (vox pop) by media. For these uses&nbsp;the organisers would have had to apply for a&nbsp;'Programme making and special events' (<a href="https://www.ofcom.org.uk/manage-your-licence/radiocommunication-licences/pmse">PMSE</a>) licence.</p> <p>Even though Ofcom carefully manages the PMSE licenses, licence exempt and shared frequencies may sometimes have interference. Interference can be caused from other users on the same frequency as well as other sources such as lights, computers, atmospheric conditions and illegal users. Normal procedures are for users who are suffering interference to contact Ofcom as soon as possible to offer technical support to help resolve the issue. However, for this event members of Ofcom&rsquo;s spectrum assurance team were there on hand to deal with interference issues.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Security</strong><br> With such a public event that had many high-profile people in attendance, security on the day would have been paramount. The police and any emergency services on hand would have been equipped with Airwave system technology. Airwave is mainly limited to voice radio, however this system will soon be phased over to the new <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-emergency-services-mobile-communications-programme/emergency-services-network">emergency services network</a> (ESN) to all police, fire, ambulance and other public safety users across the UK. The ESN is to have secure and resilient voice communication and broadband data services and the Emergency Services Mobile Communications Programme (ESMCP) will deliver the new network and devices.</p> <p><strong>Media</strong><br> The wedding was viewed live by people at home, in community centers and at &ldquo;watch parties&rdquo; through broadcast, satellite, cable or IP TV in the UK and internationally. &nbsp;Almost 24 million people in the UK watched the wedding, with about 29 million people watching the wedding in the <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/tonifitzgerald/2018/05/21/royal-wedding-ratings-how-many-people-watched-prince-harry-wed-meghan-markle/#34b8b15755c6">USA across 15 different broadcast and cable networks</a>, and the numbers for online streaming haven&rsquo;t yet been released.&nbsp;Interestingly, Sky was the first broadcaster to televise the wedding in 4K and had to <a href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/05/19/royal-wedding-facts-figures-many-people-invited-cost-windsor/">lay out 27km of cables to broadcast the wedding in UHD</a>.</p> <p>Whilst drones are increasingly used for filming, there was a <a href="http://www.thamesvalley.police.uk/news/general/policing-royal-wedding-restriction-flying-regulation/">ban on the use of drones</a> at the wedding. A flight restriction was placed around Windsor which was aimed to stop people flying aircrafts below 2,500 ft (not interfering with the Heathrow flight path)&nbsp;therefore all the&nbsp;footage on the day would have been done by shoulder-mounted, fixed or camera cranes.</p> <p><strong>Spectators&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong><br><a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-44179982"><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Crowd%20reacts%20to%20the%20kiss%20-%20BBC.JPG" style="float:right; height:268px; margin:5px; width:400px"></a>People watched the wedding as lucky guests in St George's Chapel, in the grounds of Windsor Castle, lined along the town and Long Walk, or through the TV or livestreaming. Apart from the guests in the chapel, almost all of those who were there on the day were taking photos or videos with their phones and sharing them online. Over 3.4 million social media users tweeted about the royal wedding during the ceremony, Bishop Curry's&nbsp;address&nbsp;<a href="https://www.eonline.com/uk/news/937523/10-stats-about-prince-harry-and-meghan-markle-s-wedding-that-may-surprise-you">generated 40,000 tweets per minute</a>, and the proclamation that the couple were husband and produced 27,000 tweets per minute.</p> <p>To ensure that the mobile networks in Windsor were able to deal with the high-demand, the operators could have used a &lsquo;pump-up&rsquo; <a href="https://www.smc-comms.com/mobile-portable-cellular-tower-images/">portable base station</a> or <a href="https://www.ft.com/content/9c16b23c-f80f-11e6-9516-2d969e0d3b65">&ldquo;air mast&rdquo; technology with balloons and drones</a> - though these are mainly used in areas where there is little existing infrastructure either in emergency situations such as floods or earthquakes, or&nbsp;due to rural or remote locations such as Glastonbury. However, it&rsquo;s likely that the network operator&rsquo;s solution involved a mixture of utilising the existing infrastructure in Windsor (light up base stations) and drawing on their experience developed for the London 2012 Olympics to increase network capacity for the day.</p> <hr><p>More information is available about techUK&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.techuk.org/focus/programmes/communications-infrastructure">Communications Infrastructure Programme </a>and <a href="http://www.techuk.org/about/uk-spectrum-policy-forum">UK Spectrum Policy Forum</a>.</p> <p>Some events that may be of interest:</p> <ul><li><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/conference/item/12793-drone-futures-how-the-uk-can-lead-from-the-front">Drone Futures: How the UK Can Lead from the Front</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/conference/item/12895-ses-2018-ultra-hd-conference">SES 2018 Ultra HD Conference</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/meeting/item/12631-uk-spectrum-policy-forum-spectrum-resilience">UK Spectrum Policy Forum - Spectrum Resilience</a></li> </ul>{bio}skye.macleod@techuk.org{/bio}</div> The Spectrum behind the success of the Royal Wedding 2018-05-24T17:57:34+01:00 2018-05-24T17:57:34+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13214-the-spectrum-behind-the-success-of-the-royal-wedding CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><strong>Imagine if the mics had squealed with feedback, or the live footage of The Kiss had cut out.</strong> Spectrum -&nbsp;essential for the use of&nbsp;wireless communications&nbsp;- is so intrinsically interwoven into everyday life and events that likely the only reason people would be talking about it is if something had gone disastrously wrong.</p> <p>A lot of planning and coordination went into the Royal Wedding and the events around it,&nbsp;and wireless communications would likely have played a key role in the day. &nbsp;For the wedding itself, security on the day, media and broadcasting, and the spectators in Windsor and those discussing it online &ndash; the Royal Wedding was the <a href="https://twitter.com/Ofcom/status/998511271136948224">largest number of spectrum users gathered in one open area&nbsp;in the UK since the London 2012 Olympic Games</a>.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s worth taking a few minutes to look behind the scenes and explore the wireless communications that would have made&nbsp;it possible more than <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/tonifitzgerald/2018/05/21/royal-wedding-ratings-how-many-people-watched-prince-harry-wed-meghan-markle/#34b8b15755c6">53 million</a>&nbsp;people to tune in to hear &ldquo;I will&rdquo; - and enable&nbsp;the Royal Wedding to be a success:</p> <p><strong>Wedding</strong><br> Some of the uses of wireless connectivity in the wedding were more evident than others &ndash; sharp-eyed viewers would have spotted lapel-mics attached to Bishop Michael Curry&rsquo;s robes during his fiery wedding address, and on the robes of the Archbishop of Canterbury as he proclaimed the couple husband and wife.</p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/Ofcom/status/998511271136948224"><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Royal%20Wedding.JPG" style="float:right; height:347px; width:400px"></a>Wireless microphones and walkie-talkies would have also been used behind the scenes of the event, from management staff, First Aid, Catering, Crowd marshals, Traffic marshals, Car parking and the crowd interviews (vox pop) by media. For these uses&nbsp;the organisers would have had to apply for a&nbsp;'Programme making and special events' (<a href="https://www.ofcom.org.uk/manage-your-licence/radiocommunication-licences/pmse">PMSE</a>) licence.</p> <p>Even though Ofcom carefully manages the PMSE licenses, licence exempt and shared frequencies may sometimes have interference. Interference can be caused from other users on the same frequency as well as other sources such as lights, computers, atmospheric conditions and illegal users. Normal procedures are for users who are suffering interference to contact Ofcom as soon as possible to offer technical support to help resolve the issue. However, for this event members of Ofcom&rsquo;s spectrum assurance team were there on hand to deal with interference issues.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Security</strong><br> With such a public event that had many high-profile people in attendance, security on the day would have been paramount. The police and any emergency services on hand would have been equipped with Airwave system technology. Airwave is mainly limited to voice radio, however this system will soon be phased over to the new <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-emergency-services-mobile-communications-programme/emergency-services-network">emergency services network</a> (ESN) to all police, fire, ambulance and other public safety users across the UK. The ESN is to have secure and resilient voice communication and broadband data services and the Emergency Services Mobile Communications Programme (ESMCP) will deliver the new network and devices.</p> <p><strong>Media</strong><br> The wedding was viewed live by people at home, in community centers and at &ldquo;watch parties&rdquo; through broadcast, satellite, cable or IP TV in the UK and internationally. &nbsp;Almost 24 million people in the UK watched the wedding, with about 29 million people watching the wedding in the <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/tonifitzgerald/2018/05/21/royal-wedding-ratings-how-many-people-watched-prince-harry-wed-meghan-markle/#34b8b15755c6">USA across 15 different broadcast and cable networks</a>, and the numbers for online streaming haven&rsquo;t yet been released.&nbsp;Interestingly, Sky was the first broadcaster to televise the wedding in 4K and had to <a href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/05/19/royal-wedding-facts-figures-many-people-invited-cost-windsor/">lay out 27km of cables to broadcast the wedding in UHD</a>.</p> <p>Whilst drones are increasingly used for filming, there was a <a href="http://www.thamesvalley.police.uk/news/general/policing-royal-wedding-restriction-flying-regulation/">ban on the use of drones</a> at the wedding. A flight restriction was placed around Windsor which was aimed to stop people flying aircrafts below 2,500 ft (not interfering with the Heathrow flight path)&nbsp;therefore all the&nbsp;footage on the day would have been done by shoulder-mounted, fixed or camera cranes.</p> <p><strong>Spectators&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong><br><a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-44179982"><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Crowd%20reacts%20to%20the%20kiss%20-%20BBC.JPG" style="float:right; height:268px; margin:5px; width:400px"></a>People watched the wedding as lucky guests in St George's Chapel, in the grounds of Windsor Castle, lined along the town and Long Walk, or through the TV or livestreaming. Apart from the guests in the chapel, almost all of those who were there on the day were taking photos or videos with their phones and sharing them online. Over 3.4 million social media users tweeted about the royal wedding during the ceremony, Bishop Curry's&nbsp;address&nbsp;<a href="https://www.eonline.com/uk/news/937523/10-stats-about-prince-harry-and-meghan-markle-s-wedding-that-may-surprise-you">generated 40,000 tweets per minute</a>, and the proclamation that the couple were husband and produced 27,000 tweets per minute.</p> <p>To ensure that the mobile networks in Windsor were able to deal with the high-demand, the operators could have used a &lsquo;pump-up&rsquo; <a href="https://www.smc-comms.com/mobile-portable-cellular-tower-images/">portable base station</a> or <a href="https://www.ft.com/content/9c16b23c-f80f-11e6-9516-2d969e0d3b65">&ldquo;air mast&rdquo; technology with balloons and drones</a> - though these are mainly used in areas where there is little existing infrastructure either in emergency situations such as floods or earthquakes, or&nbsp;due to rural or remote locations such as Glastonbury. However, it&rsquo;s likely that the network operator&rsquo;s solution involved a mixture of utilising the existing infrastructure in Windsor (light up base stations) and drawing on their experience developed for the London 2012 Olympics to increase network capacity for the day.</p> <hr><p>More information is available about techUK&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.techuk.org/focus/programmes/communications-infrastructure">Communications Infrastructure Programme </a>and <a href="http://www.techuk.org/about/uk-spectrum-policy-forum">UK Spectrum Policy Forum</a>.</p> <p>Some events that may be of interest:</p> <ul><li><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/conference/item/12793-drone-futures-how-the-uk-can-lead-from-the-front">Drone Futures: How the UK Can Lead from the Front</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/conference/item/12895-ses-2018-ultra-hd-conference">SES 2018 Ultra HD Conference</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/meeting/item/12631-uk-spectrum-policy-forum-spectrum-resilience">UK Spectrum Policy Forum - Spectrum Resilience</a></li> </ul>{bio}skye.macleod@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><strong>Imagine if the mics had squealed with feedback, or the live footage of The Kiss had cut out.</strong> Spectrum -&nbsp;essential for the use of&nbsp;wireless communications&nbsp;- is so intrinsically interwoven into everyday life and events that likely the only reason people would be talking about it is if something had gone disastrously wrong.</p> <p>A lot of planning and coordination went into the Royal Wedding and the events around it,&nbsp;and wireless communications would likely have played a key role in the day. &nbsp;For the wedding itself, security on the day, media and broadcasting, and the spectators in Windsor and those discussing it online &ndash; the Royal Wedding was the <a href="https://twitter.com/Ofcom/status/998511271136948224">largest number of spectrum users gathered in one open area&nbsp;in the UK since the London 2012 Olympic Games</a>.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s worth taking a few minutes to look behind the scenes and explore the wireless communications that would have made&nbsp;it possible more than <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/tonifitzgerald/2018/05/21/royal-wedding-ratings-how-many-people-watched-prince-harry-wed-meghan-markle/#34b8b15755c6">53 million</a>&nbsp;people to tune in to hear &ldquo;I will&rdquo; - and enable&nbsp;the Royal Wedding to be a success:</p> <p><strong>Wedding</strong><br> Some of the uses of wireless connectivity in the wedding were more evident than others &ndash; sharp-eyed viewers would have spotted lapel-mics attached to Bishop Michael Curry&rsquo;s robes during his fiery wedding address, and on the robes of the Archbishop of Canterbury as he proclaimed the couple husband and wife.</p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/Ofcom/status/998511271136948224"><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Royal%20Wedding.JPG" style="float:right; height:347px; width:400px"></a>Wireless microphones and walkie-talkies would have also been used behind the scenes of the event, from management staff, First Aid, Catering, Crowd marshals, Traffic marshals, Car parking and the crowd interviews (vox pop) by media. For these uses&nbsp;the organisers would have had to apply for a&nbsp;'Programme making and special events' (<a href="https://www.ofcom.org.uk/manage-your-licence/radiocommunication-licences/pmse">PMSE</a>) licence.</p> <p>Even though Ofcom carefully manages the PMSE licenses, licence exempt and shared frequencies may sometimes have interference. Interference can be caused from other users on the same frequency as well as other sources such as lights, computers, atmospheric conditions and illegal users. Normal procedures are for users who are suffering interference to contact Ofcom as soon as possible to offer technical support to help resolve the issue. However, for this event members of Ofcom&rsquo;s spectrum assurance team were there on hand to deal with interference issues.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Security</strong><br> With such a public event that had many high-profile people in attendance, security on the day would have been paramount. The police and any emergency services on hand would have been equipped with Airwave system technology. Airwave is mainly limited to voice radio, however this system will soon be phased over to the new <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-emergency-services-mobile-communications-programme/emergency-services-network">emergency services network</a> (ESN) to all police, fire, ambulance and other public safety users across the UK. The ESN is to have secure and resilient voice communication and broadband data services and the Emergency Services Mobile Communications Programme (ESMCP) will deliver the new network and devices.</p> <p><strong>Media</strong><br> The wedding was viewed live by people at home, in community centers and at &ldquo;watch parties&rdquo; through broadcast, satellite, cable or IP TV in the UK and internationally. &nbsp;Almost 24 million people in the UK watched the wedding, with about 29 million people watching the wedding in the <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/tonifitzgerald/2018/05/21/royal-wedding-ratings-how-many-people-watched-prince-harry-wed-meghan-markle/#34b8b15755c6">USA across 15 different broadcast and cable networks</a>, and the numbers for online streaming haven&rsquo;t yet been released.&nbsp;Interestingly, Sky was the first broadcaster to televise the wedding in 4K and had to <a href="https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/05/19/royal-wedding-facts-figures-many-people-invited-cost-windsor/">lay out 27km of cables to broadcast the wedding in UHD</a>.</p> <p>Whilst drones are increasingly used for filming, there was a <a href="http://www.thamesvalley.police.uk/news/general/policing-royal-wedding-restriction-flying-regulation/">ban on the use of drones</a> at the wedding. A flight restriction was placed around Windsor which was aimed to stop people flying aircrafts below 2,500 ft (not interfering with the Heathrow flight path)&nbsp;therefore all the&nbsp;footage on the day would have been done by shoulder-mounted, fixed or camera cranes.</p> <p><strong>Spectators&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong><br><a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-44179982"><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Crowd%20reacts%20to%20the%20kiss%20-%20BBC.JPG" style="float:right; height:268px; margin:5px; width:400px"></a>People watched the wedding as lucky guests in St George's Chapel, in the grounds of Windsor Castle, lined along the town and Long Walk, or through the TV or livestreaming. Apart from the guests in the chapel, almost all of those who were there on the day were taking photos or videos with their phones and sharing them online. Over 3.4 million social media users tweeted about the royal wedding during the ceremony, Bishop Curry's&nbsp;address&nbsp;<a href="https://www.eonline.com/uk/news/937523/10-stats-about-prince-harry-and-meghan-markle-s-wedding-that-may-surprise-you">generated 40,000 tweets per minute</a>, and the proclamation that the couple were husband and produced 27,000 tweets per minute.</p> <p>To ensure that the mobile networks in Windsor were able to deal with the high-demand, the operators could have used a &lsquo;pump-up&rsquo; <a href="https://www.smc-comms.com/mobile-portable-cellular-tower-images/">portable base station</a> or <a href="https://www.ft.com/content/9c16b23c-f80f-11e6-9516-2d969e0d3b65">&ldquo;air mast&rdquo; technology with balloons and drones</a> - though these are mainly used in areas where there is little existing infrastructure either in emergency situations such as floods or earthquakes, or&nbsp;due to rural or remote locations such as Glastonbury. However, it&rsquo;s likely that the network operator&rsquo;s solution involved a mixture of utilising the existing infrastructure in Windsor (light up base stations) and drawing on their experience developed for the London 2012 Olympics to increase network capacity for the day.</p> <hr><p>More information is available about techUK&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.techuk.org/focus/programmes/communications-infrastructure">Communications Infrastructure Programme </a>and <a href="http://www.techuk.org/about/uk-spectrum-policy-forum">UK Spectrum Policy Forum</a>.</p> <p>Some events that may be of interest:</p> <ul><li><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/conference/item/12793-drone-futures-how-the-uk-can-lead-from-the-front">Drone Futures: How the UK Can Lead from the Front</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/conference/item/12895-ses-2018-ultra-hd-conference">SES 2018 Ultra HD Conference</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/meeting/item/12631-uk-spectrum-policy-forum-spectrum-resilience">UK Spectrum Policy Forum - Spectrum Resilience</a></li> </ul>{bio}skye.macleod@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Public procurement and IT contracting 2018-05-24T16:14:47+01:00 2018-05-24T16:14:47+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/events/meeting/item/13213-public-procurement-and-it-contracting CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Registration from 9.45am</p> <p>The Government and wider public sector continues to be a key market for IT suppliers, from major full service outsourcing, through to the purchase of niche cloud services. In a competitive marketplace, there is more focus than ever on the public procurement rules governing how the public sector must select its suppliers, and how IT suppliers can use those rules to get an edge in a competition.<br><br> This session will look at what the latest case law and policy developments mean for IT procurements, and how and when IT suppliers can supply outside of an OJEU procurement process, from sole supplier arrangements through to contract extensions.<br><br><strong>Speakers:</strong><br><a href="https://www.mills-reeve.com/kevin-calder/" target="_blank">Kevin Calder</a>&nbsp;is head of Technology and Life Sciences at national law firm Mills &amp; Reeve, and has advised on a number of major IT procurements in the public sector, acting for both buyers including central Government departments as well as IT suppliers. He set up the leading free to access public procurement resource <a href="https://www.procurementportal.com/" target="_blank">procurementportal.com</a>.&nbsp;<br><br> Kevin will be joined by a speaker from leading public procurement advisers <a href="https://www.monckton.com/" target="_blank">Monckton Chambers</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>{bio}mariana.obetzanova@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Registration from 9.45am</p> <p>The Government and wider public sector continues to be a key market for IT suppliers, from major full service outsourcing, through to the purchase of niche cloud services. In a competitive marketplace, there is more focus than ever on the public procurement rules governing how the public sector must select its suppliers, and how IT suppliers can use those rules to get an edge in a competition.<br><br> This session will look at what the latest case law and policy developments mean for IT procurements, and how and when IT suppliers can supply outside of an OJEU procurement process, from sole supplier arrangements through to contract extensions.<br><br><strong>Speakers:</strong><br><a href="https://www.mills-reeve.com/kevin-calder/" target="_blank">Kevin Calder</a>&nbsp;is head of Technology and Life Sciences at national law firm Mills &amp; Reeve, and has advised on a number of major IT procurements in the public sector, acting for both buyers including central Government departments as well as IT suppliers. He set up the leading free to access public procurement resource <a href="https://www.procurementportal.com/" target="_blank">procurementportal.com</a>.&nbsp;<br><br> Kevin will be joined by a speaker from leading public procurement advisers <a href="https://www.monckton.com/" target="_blank">Monckton Chambers</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>{bio}mariana.obetzanova@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Public procurement and IT contracting 2018-05-24T16:14:47+01:00 2018-05-24T16:14:47+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/events/meeting/item/13212-public-procurement-and-it-contracting CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Registration from 9.45am</p> <p>The Government and wider public sector continues to be a key market for IT suppliers, from major full service outsourcing, through to the purchase of niche cloud services. In a competitive marketplace, there is more focus than ever on the public procurement rules governing how the public sector must select its suppliers, and how IT suppliers can use those rules to get an edge in a competition.<br><br> This session will look at what the latest case law and policy developments mean for IT procurements, and how and when IT suppliers can supply outside of an OJEU procurement process, from sole supplier arrangements through to contract extensions.<br><br><strong>Speakers:</strong><br><a href="https://www.mills-reeve.com/kevin-calder/" target="_blank">Kevin Calder</a>&nbsp;is head of Technology and Life Sciences at national law firm Mills &amp; Reeve, and has advised on a number of major IT procurements in the public sector, acting for both buyers including central Government departments as well as IT suppliers. He set up the leading free to access public procurement resource <a href="https://www.procurementportal.com/" target="_blank">procurementportal.com</a>.&nbsp;<br><br> Kevin will be joined by a speaker from leading public procurement advisers <a href="https://www.monckton.com/" target="_blank">Monckton Chambers</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>{bio}mariana.obetzanova@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Registration from 9.45am</p> <p>The Government and wider public sector continues to be a key market for IT suppliers, from major full service outsourcing, through to the purchase of niche cloud services. In a competitive marketplace, there is more focus than ever on the public procurement rules governing how the public sector must select its suppliers, and how IT suppliers can use those rules to get an edge in a competition.<br><br> This session will look at what the latest case law and policy developments mean for IT procurements, and how and when IT suppliers can supply outside of an OJEU procurement process, from sole supplier arrangements through to contract extensions.<br><br><strong>Speakers:</strong><br><a href="https://www.mills-reeve.com/kevin-calder/" target="_blank">Kevin Calder</a>&nbsp;is head of Technology and Life Sciences at national law firm Mills &amp; Reeve, and has advised on a number of major IT procurements in the public sector, acting for both buyers including central Government departments as well as IT suppliers. He set up the leading free to access public procurement resource <a href="https://www.procurementportal.com/" target="_blank">procurementportal.com</a>.&nbsp;<br><br> Kevin will be joined by a speaker from leading public procurement advisers <a href="https://www.monckton.com/" target="_blank">Monckton Chambers</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>{bio}mariana.obetzanova@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Police National Enabling Programme: National Management Centre Tender 2018-05-01T15:27:00+01:00 2018-05-01T15:27:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/13211-police-national-enabling-programme-national-management-centre-tender CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The Police National Enabling Programme is carrying out a tender for the provision of a National Management Centre for UK Police Forces.</p> <p>The National Enabling Programme is designed to provide police with the tools and capabilities they need to for the future. The NEP will ensure all UK police forces have a secure platform and national standards that enable new ways of working and collaborating; whilst maintaining the autonomy for local decision-making and the control of their digital assets.</p> <p>The NEP is divided into three core strands: Productivity Services, Identity and Access Management, and a National Management Centre.</p> <p>As the cyber threat landscape facing the 48 police forces of the UK continues to evolve, so must the means by which forces maintain their security posture. Rather than individual forces independently managing and defending their technology infrastructure, the National Police Technology Council (NPTC) vision is to establish a National Management Centre (NMC) that provides a comprehensive range of cyber security and network management services to UK Policing.</p> <p>Through a nationally coordinated, locally delivered, NMC, forces will have access to a centre of excellence with the ability to manage internal and external threats, and enhance legislative compliance. Individual forces will have the ability to acquire services from a centrally provisioned, locally delivered service based on their risk profile, technology estate, and operating models, providing cost-efficient cyber security.</p> <p><a href="https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/783660d5-5042-46b4-a161-3c2b297ef7b7?p=@8=UFQxUlRRPT0=NjJNT0" target="_blank">Interested suppliers can find out more here.</a></p>{bio}henry.rex@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The Police National Enabling Programme is carrying out a tender for the provision of a National Management Centre for UK Police Forces.</p> <p>The National Enabling Programme is designed to provide police with the tools and capabilities they need to for the future. The NEP will ensure all UK police forces have a secure platform and national standards that enable new ways of working and collaborating; whilst maintaining the autonomy for local decision-making and the control of their digital assets.</p> <p>The NEP is divided into three core strands: Productivity Services, Identity and Access Management, and a National Management Centre.</p> <p>As the cyber threat landscape facing the 48 police forces of the UK continues to evolve, so must the means by which forces maintain their security posture. Rather than individual forces independently managing and defending their technology infrastructure, the National Police Technology Council (NPTC) vision is to establish a National Management Centre (NMC) that provides a comprehensive range of cyber security and network management services to UK Policing.</p> <p>Through a nationally coordinated, locally delivered, NMC, forces will have access to a centre of excellence with the ability to manage internal and external threats, and enhance legislative compliance. Individual forces will have the ability to acquire services from a centrally provisioned, locally delivered service based on their risk profile, technology estate, and operating models, providing cost-efficient cyber security.</p> <p><a href="https://www.contractsfinder.service.gov.uk/Notice/783660d5-5042-46b4-a161-3c2b297ef7b7?p=@8=UFQxUlRRPT0=NjJNT0" target="_blank">Interested suppliers can find out more here.</a></p>{bio}henry.rex@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Response to Internet Safety Strategy Green Paper signals movement 2018-05-24T14:53:52+01:00 2018-05-24T14:53:52+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/13209-response-to-internet-safety-strategy-green-paper-signals-movement CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Matt Hancock and Margot James had a busy Sunday touring the tv and radio studios to plug what is essentially a Government response to its own Green Paper. That may sound a little odd, but the Internet Safety Strategy, one of the pillars of the Government&rsquo;s Digital Charter, is an issue that politicians believe has real resonance with the public.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The response outlines steps the Government could take to help achieve its stated aim for the UK to be the safest place to be online. It tackles issues such as a Code of Practice for social media companies, transparency reporting, online advertising, and limitations to liability.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2><em><u>The Draft Social Media Code of Practice tackling abusive content online :</u></em></h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The proposed statutory code of practice would provide guidance to social media providers on appropriate reporting mechanisms and moderation processes to tackle abusive content. By setting out clear standards for industry, the government wants to make sure there is improved support for users online, and that more companies are taking consistent action to tackle abuse.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Tackling online harms is a key priority for technology companies. The major social media platforms are investing heavily in people, processes and new technology to tackle the misuse of their platforms. The response recognises that that these companies are working constructively with Government. Significant volumes of harmful and illegal content are now identified and removed before they have been viewed or accessed online.&nbsp; No-one believes that is it is a case of job done and there is real commitment to building on progress.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Code of Practice must be careful not to hinder these existing efforts, enabled under self-regulatory regimes. A principles-based framework, that allows companies to innovate in how to meet their obligations, will be the most effective method in achieving the Government&rsquo;s aims.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Government&rsquo;s has indicated its commitment not to be overly prescriptive about how companies meet their obligations under the code. techUK has made clear its view that this approach should be maintained.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The work of social media platforms should not take place in a vacuum. Any technical solutions by companies to enforce the Code of Practice should be supported by wider efforts to reduce the amount of harmful content being posted, including the better coordination of action in schools to build digital resilience. Enforcement officials also need to have the guidance and training necessary to be able to respond to crimes committed online. The notion that the online and offline world is covered by different rules helps no-one.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2><em><u>The Draft Transparency Report:</u></em></h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The largest social media companies such as Google, Facebook and Twitter have all published transparency reports over recent months. While the biggest companies have the staff and tools to meet these requirements, the transparency report may place a significant compliance burden on some of the smallest social media sites.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Government response suggests that any company with more than 250,000 users in the UK will be required to sign up to the Code of Practice and produce a transparency report. Compared to a traditional business where a similar number of customers would be significant, a social media platform of that size is likely to be small with much more limited resources. A careful balance therefore needs to be struck to ensure that the regulatory requirements imposed on small new entrants does not become a barrier either to market entry or to the ability to scale. Doing so would risk entrenching the position of incumbents and inhibit innovation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In developing the Transparency Report we would urge the Government to think about the metrics to be used. It is essential that they provide an effective mechanism for true reflection of the progress being made in tackling harmful content. For example, action by sites to reduce harmful content and make users more aware of the tools and redress options available to them may well lead to an increase in the number of flagged videos. Under the report this rise in flagged reports could be misinterpreted as a negative development unless there is a clear understanding of the reasons behind it. Establishing strong metrics that provide an accurate picture of progress will be key to building confidence in the value of these reports.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2><em><u>The review of online advertising and social media levy: </u></em></h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Amidst high profile political campaigns and revelations such as Cambridge Analytica there is much debate about the implications of digital innovation, such as targeted advertising, on individuals and society. It is right we have this debate, but any changes or new regulation should be based on informed debate, acknowledging both the challenges and opportunities posed by these new technologies.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The importance of online advertising to the internet cannot be understated; it is the backbone that has enabled the provision of countless free to use services from search engines to video hosting, that we all rely on day-to-day, and provide a huge consumer surplus.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This is why the new Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation is critical. We look forward to working closely with the Centre as it looks at these kinds of issues so we can get them right, and not harm the ecosystem that supports thousands of online platforms and content creators across the UK. techUK has been a strong advocate of the need to build centers of expertise with the capability and capacity to drive practical progress on these issues. The UK can and should seek to be at the forefront of answering some of the most challenging questions that will define the digital age.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Government&rsquo;s acknowledgement of the industry&rsquo;s wide range of work to tackle online harms and the difficulty of reallocating resources without disturbing the status quo is welcome. It is clear from the Green Paper&rsquo;s responses few people think a centralised social media levy is the most effective way to tackle online harms. The industry is committed to continued engagement with the Government in upcoming roundtables to help develop a proportionate solution that supports existing initiatives while helping reduce duplication of efforts.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2><em><u>Next steps:</u></em></h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>While Hancock has repeatedly committed to legislation over the past few days, what this legislation will target is still far from clear. Rather than starting with legislation as a starting point we should consider what the fastest, most targeted and effective way to tackle harmful content is.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Undefined legislation, which is &ldquo;a couple of years&rdquo; away according to Hancock, is unlikely to be the most effective or fastest solution. Instead we should focus on how we can change the existing framework right now to make the system as effective as can be.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Industry will continue to invest and innovate to protect users online, but there is more that can be done to support this work. When reviewing flagged content one of the biggest challenges companies face in removing harmful content online is making decisions where there is a lack of legal definition.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>One reason industry action on child abuse imagery has been so effective is not just because of the moral and legal obligations on companies, but because of it&rsquo;s very clear, black and white, nature. This is not the same with harmful but non-illegal content, where private companies must make difficult decisions which may encroach on freedom of expression. &nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Government can help improve the existing framework by providing clarification on grey areas of the law and providing legal definitions for terms such as &ldquo;harmful content&rdquo; and &ldquo;offensive communications&rdquo;. By doing so companies will be better enabled to make difficult decisions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>With a White Paper on the horizon it is clear that the Green Paper delivered a green light for action.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>techUK is committed to engaging constructively with Government to find solutions that work.</p>{bio}ben.bradley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Matt Hancock and Margot James had a busy Sunday touring the tv and radio studios to plug what is essentially a Government response to its own Green Paper. That may sound a little odd, but the Internet Safety Strategy, one of the pillars of the Government&rsquo;s Digital Charter, is an issue that politicians believe has real resonance with the public.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The response outlines steps the Government could take to help achieve its stated aim for the UK to be the safest place to be online. It tackles issues such as a Code of Practice for social media companies, transparency reporting, online advertising, and limitations to liability.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2><em><u>The Draft Social Media Code of Practice tackling abusive content online :</u></em></h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The proposed statutory code of practice would provide guidance to social media providers on appropriate reporting mechanisms and moderation processes to tackle abusive content. By setting out clear standards for industry, the government wants to make sure there is improved support for users online, and that more companies are taking consistent action to tackle abuse.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Tackling online harms is a key priority for technology companies. The major social media platforms are investing heavily in people, processes and new technology to tackle the misuse of their platforms. The response recognises that that these companies are working constructively with Government. Significant volumes of harmful and illegal content are now identified and removed before they have been viewed or accessed online.&nbsp; No-one believes that is it is a case of job done and there is real commitment to building on progress.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Code of Practice must be careful not to hinder these existing efforts, enabled under self-regulatory regimes. A principles-based framework, that allows companies to innovate in how to meet their obligations, will be the most effective method in achieving the Government&rsquo;s aims.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Government&rsquo;s has indicated its commitment not to be overly prescriptive about how companies meet their obligations under the code. techUK has made clear its view that this approach should be maintained.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The work of social media platforms should not take place in a vacuum. Any technical solutions by companies to enforce the Code of Practice should be supported by wider efforts to reduce the amount of harmful content being posted, including the better coordination of action in schools to build digital resilience. Enforcement officials also need to have the guidance and training necessary to be able to respond to crimes committed online. The notion that the online and offline world is covered by different rules helps no-one.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2><em><u>The Draft Transparency Report:</u></em></h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The largest social media companies such as Google, Facebook and Twitter have all published transparency reports over recent months. While the biggest companies have the staff and tools to meet these requirements, the transparency report may place a significant compliance burden on some of the smallest social media sites.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Government response suggests that any company with more than 250,000 users in the UK will be required to sign up to the Code of Practice and produce a transparency report. Compared to a traditional business where a similar number of customers would be significant, a social media platform of that size is likely to be small with much more limited resources. A careful balance therefore needs to be struck to ensure that the regulatory requirements imposed on small new entrants does not become a barrier either to market entry or to the ability to scale. Doing so would risk entrenching the position of incumbents and inhibit innovation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In developing the Transparency Report we would urge the Government to think about the metrics to be used. It is essential that they provide an effective mechanism for true reflection of the progress being made in tackling harmful content. For example, action by sites to reduce harmful content and make users more aware of the tools and redress options available to them may well lead to an increase in the number of flagged videos. Under the report this rise in flagged reports could be misinterpreted as a negative development unless there is a clear understanding of the reasons behind it. Establishing strong metrics that provide an accurate picture of progress will be key to building confidence in the value of these reports.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2><em><u>The review of online advertising and social media levy: </u></em></h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Amidst high profile political campaigns and revelations such as Cambridge Analytica there is much debate about the implications of digital innovation, such as targeted advertising, on individuals and society. It is right we have this debate, but any changes or new regulation should be based on informed debate, acknowledging both the challenges and opportunities posed by these new technologies.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The importance of online advertising to the internet cannot be understated; it is the backbone that has enabled the provision of countless free to use services from search engines to video hosting, that we all rely on day-to-day, and provide a huge consumer surplus.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This is why the new Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation is critical. We look forward to working closely with the Centre as it looks at these kinds of issues so we can get them right, and not harm the ecosystem that supports thousands of online platforms and content creators across the UK. techUK has been a strong advocate of the need to build centers of expertise with the capability and capacity to drive practical progress on these issues. The UK can and should seek to be at the forefront of answering some of the most challenging questions that will define the digital age.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Government&rsquo;s acknowledgement of the industry&rsquo;s wide range of work to tackle online harms and the difficulty of reallocating resources without disturbing the status quo is welcome. It is clear from the Green Paper&rsquo;s responses few people think a centralised social media levy is the most effective way to tackle online harms. The industry is committed to continued engagement with the Government in upcoming roundtables to help develop a proportionate solution that supports existing initiatives while helping reduce duplication of efforts.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h2><em><u>Next steps:</u></em></h2> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>While Hancock has repeatedly committed to legislation over the past few days, what this legislation will target is still far from clear. Rather than starting with legislation as a starting point we should consider what the fastest, most targeted and effective way to tackle harmful content is.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Undefined legislation, which is &ldquo;a couple of years&rdquo; away according to Hancock, is unlikely to be the most effective or fastest solution. Instead we should focus on how we can change the existing framework right now to make the system as effective as can be.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Industry will continue to invest and innovate to protect users online, but there is more that can be done to support this work. When reviewing flagged content one of the biggest challenges companies face in removing harmful content online is making decisions where there is a lack of legal definition.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>One reason industry action on child abuse imagery has been so effective is not just because of the moral and legal obligations on companies, but because of it&rsquo;s very clear, black and white, nature. This is not the same with harmful but non-illegal content, where private companies must make difficult decisions which may encroach on freedom of expression. &nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Government can help improve the existing framework by providing clarification on grey areas of the law and providing legal definitions for terms such as &ldquo;harmful content&rdquo; and &ldquo;offensive communications&rdquo;. By doing so companies will be better enabled to make difficult decisions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>With a White Paper on the horizon it is clear that the Green Paper delivered a green light for action.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>techUK is committed to engaging constructively with Government to find solutions that work.</p>{bio}ben.bradley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Drones for Good 2018-05-24T12:59:09+01:00 2018-05-24T12:59:09+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13207-drones-for-good CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Last week an FBI bigwig <a href="https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/05/04/anti_fbi_drone_swarm_claims/">told a story</a> that a fleet of drones disrupted an FBI surveillance operation and in the UK there have been instances of drones bringing contraband into prisons (<a href="https://www.nanalyze.com/2018/05/14-anti-drone-technology-startups/">though innovative new tech is disrupting this</a>). Last week&rsquo;s Midsomer Murders featured a murder-by-drone (though the drone also delivered beer) and stories featuring near misses between drones and airliners are becoming more frequent.</p> <p>This backdrop may make this technology sound bad, and of course there are concerns, but drones and UAVs will be revolutionary with some incredible applications. Drone tech is an economic opportunity worth billions and exploring the future user cases, plus getting the policy framework right so the UK can capitalise on the new tech is the subject of a <strong><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/conference/item/12793-drone-futures-how-the-uk-can-lead-from-the-front">free conference we&rsquo;re holding on 13 June in London</a></strong>.</p> <p>The UK has some amazing drone start ups and UAVs are being used in <a href="https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=oil+snd+gas+uk+drone&amp;oq=oil+snd+gas+uk+drone&amp;aqs=chrome..69i57j0.3247j0j9&amp;sourceid=chrome&amp;ie=UTF-8">oil &amp; gas</a>, <a href="https://www.intelligenttransport.com/transport-news/67614/first-long-term-drones-licence/">rail maintenance</a>, <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-42179196/drones-to-deliver-rural-broadband-huh">deliviering broadband</a>&nbsp;and <a href="http://wwtonline.co.uk/news/welsh-water-uses-drones-to-survey-assets#.WwaqsUgvzIU">utilities</a> are being used to deliver public, social and environmental benefits.</p> <p>Lincolnshire Police <a href="https://twitter.com/lincscopter?lang=en">use drones across the county</a> to search for missing people, tackle rural crime, aid local agencies and control traffic and large events as they are a more practical and cheaper alternative to a helicopter and some forces have saved millions from drone adoption.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.theplastictide.com/">Plastic Tide </a>use drone and AI technology to fly along beaches and &lsquo;tag&rsquo; plastic litter. The machine learning algorithm correctly identified 90% of plastic litter, massively aiding volunteers&nbsp;cleaning the beaches.</p> <p>Globally academics are <a href="https://phys.org/news/2018-05-smart-drones-deep-low-cost-precision.html">developing precision agriculture drones</a>. Using data like soil condition, pressure and historical yields, UAVs can fly/roll over farms to deploy fertiliser and water in the most optimal way.</p> <p>Drones are used extensively to combat illegal wildlife crime too &ndash; across Africa drones are combating poaching&nbsp;and drones are being <a href="https://www.droneseed.co/">used to disperse seeds</a> in areas at risk of deforestation.</p> <p>In the future drones could help tackle urban air quality and traffic. For example<a href="https://www.dezeen.com/2018/03/22/priestmangoode-dragonfly-concept-drone-delivery-system/">, drone deliveries could reduce commercial traffic and reduce emissions</a>. Imagine van and lorry deliveries ending at a port outside a city and goods being loaded onto autonomous barges with smaller aerial drones picking up packages and delivering them via safe air corridors to the final address. This is just one of the many potential revolutionary new user cases in development&nbsp;<a href="https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/8/17331490/uber-flying-taxi-embraer-pipistrel-karem">alongside drone taxis</a> and <a href="https://www.zdnet.com/article/huawei-and-lg-u-use-vr-drone-to-deliver-5g/">floating WiFi/5G stations</a>.</p> <p>To get to this point and position the UK as a leader we need a policy environment that spurs investment and enables higher drone adoption. There are some obvious challenges to overcome, not least questions around legal/insurer liability, spectrum allocation, digital connectivity and how to safely accommodate drones in increasingly crowded airspace. The <a href="https://services.parliament.uk/bills/2017-19/droneregulation.html">Drone (Regulation) Bill</a> before Parliament is the best opportunity to do this and we look forward to exploring this at the conference in June.</p> <p>Tickets are <strong><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/conference/item/12793-drone-futures-how-the-uk-can-lead-from-the-front">free for the event and you can register here</a></strong> or email <a href="mailto:craig.melson@techUK.org">craig.melson@techUK.org</a>.</p>{bio}craig.melson@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}julian.mcgougan@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Last week an FBI bigwig <a href="https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/05/04/anti_fbi_drone_swarm_claims/">told a story</a> that a fleet of drones disrupted an FBI surveillance operation and in the UK there have been instances of drones bringing contraband into prisons (<a href="https://www.nanalyze.com/2018/05/14-anti-drone-technology-startups/">though innovative new tech is disrupting this</a>). Last week&rsquo;s Midsomer Murders featured a murder-by-drone (though the drone also delivered beer) and stories featuring near misses between drones and airliners are becoming more frequent.</p> <p>This backdrop may make this technology sound bad, and of course there are concerns, but drones and UAVs will be revolutionary with some incredible applications. Drone tech is an economic opportunity worth billions and exploring the future user cases, plus getting the policy framework right so the UK can capitalise on the new tech is the subject of a <strong><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/conference/item/12793-drone-futures-how-the-uk-can-lead-from-the-front">free conference we&rsquo;re holding on 13 June in London</a></strong>.</p> <p>The UK has some amazing drone start ups and UAVs are being used in <a href="https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=oil+snd+gas+uk+drone&amp;oq=oil+snd+gas+uk+drone&amp;aqs=chrome..69i57j0.3247j0j9&amp;sourceid=chrome&amp;ie=UTF-8">oil &amp; gas</a>, <a href="https://www.intelligenttransport.com/transport-news/67614/first-long-term-drones-licence/">rail maintenance</a>, <a href="http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-42179196/drones-to-deliver-rural-broadband-huh">deliviering broadband</a>&nbsp;and <a href="http://wwtonline.co.uk/news/welsh-water-uses-drones-to-survey-assets#.WwaqsUgvzIU">utilities</a> are being used to deliver public, social and environmental benefits.</p> <p>Lincolnshire Police <a href="https://twitter.com/lincscopter?lang=en">use drones across the county</a> to search for missing people, tackle rural crime, aid local agencies and control traffic and large events as they are a more practical and cheaper alternative to a helicopter and some forces have saved millions from drone adoption.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.theplastictide.com/">Plastic Tide </a>use drone and AI technology to fly along beaches and &lsquo;tag&rsquo; plastic litter. The machine learning algorithm correctly identified 90% of plastic litter, massively aiding volunteers&nbsp;cleaning the beaches.</p> <p>Globally academics are <a href="https://phys.org/news/2018-05-smart-drones-deep-low-cost-precision.html">developing precision agriculture drones</a>. Using data like soil condition, pressure and historical yields, UAVs can fly/roll over farms to deploy fertiliser and water in the most optimal way.</p> <p>Drones are used extensively to combat illegal wildlife crime too &ndash; across Africa drones are combating poaching&nbsp;and drones are being <a href="https://www.droneseed.co/">used to disperse seeds</a> in areas at risk of deforestation.</p> <p>In the future drones could help tackle urban air quality and traffic. For example<a href="https://www.dezeen.com/2018/03/22/priestmangoode-dragonfly-concept-drone-delivery-system/">, drone deliveries could reduce commercial traffic and reduce emissions</a>. Imagine van and lorry deliveries ending at a port outside a city and goods being loaded onto autonomous barges with smaller aerial drones picking up packages and delivering them via safe air corridors to the final address. This is just one of the many potential revolutionary new user cases in development&nbsp;<a href="https://www.theverge.com/2018/5/8/17331490/uber-flying-taxi-embraer-pipistrel-karem">alongside drone taxis</a> and <a href="https://www.zdnet.com/article/huawei-and-lg-u-use-vr-drone-to-deliver-5g/">floating WiFi/5G stations</a>.</p> <p>To get to this point and position the UK as a leader we need a policy environment that spurs investment and enables higher drone adoption. There are some obvious challenges to overcome, not least questions around legal/insurer liability, spectrum allocation, digital connectivity and how to safely accommodate drones in increasingly crowded airspace. The <a href="https://services.parliament.uk/bills/2017-19/droneregulation.html">Drone (Regulation) Bill</a> before Parliament is the best opportunity to do this and we look forward to exploring this at the conference in June.</p> <p>Tickets are <strong><a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/conference/item/12793-drone-futures-how-the-uk-can-lead-from-the-front">free for the event and you can register here</a></strong> or email <a href="mailto:craig.melson@techUK.org">craig.melson@techUK.org</a>.</p>{bio}craig.melson@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}julian.mcgougan@techuk.org{/bio}</div> techUK comments on plans for UK-EU Partnership around Data Protection 2018-05-23T13:51:45+01:00 2018-05-23T13:51:45+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/13202-techuk-comments-on-plans-for-uk-eu-partnership-around-data-protection CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><strong>Commenting on the Government&rsquo;s publication of a presentation on its vision for the future UK-EU&nbsp;Partnership around data protection, Antony Walker, deputy CEO at techUK, said:</strong></p> <p>We strongly support the UK Government&rsquo;s proposal for a data protection partnership. techUK has long argued that it is in the interests of both the UK and the EU27 to have continued alignment and a close relationship on data protection. The UK Data Protection Bill is due to receive Royal Assent today demonstrating the UK&rsquo;s commitment for close alignment with EU data protection rules. The slides published by the Government today make a strong and compelling case for why the UK and the EU should agree a close partnership on data protection.</p> <p>Data flows are a vital underpinning of international trade in a global digital economy.. The continued free flow of data, via mutual adequacy agreements, between the UK and the EU post-Brexit is crucial for organisations of every size and sector. The European data economy is expected to be worth &euro;739 billion by 2020 and data flows will be key to achieving that.</p> <p>The UK Information Commissioner&rsquo;s Office is well-respected at EU-level and has been a significant contributor to discussions around EU data protection policy. Continued ICO involvement on the European Data Protection Board is in the interest of both the EU and the UK. The ICO was a key player in the development of the upcoming GDPR and other EU data protection authorities often look to the ICO for leadership.</p> <p>techUK supports the Government&rsquo;s ambitions on data protection. We encourage the EU to recognise the mutual benefits of a continued close relationship on data protection, and to commit to having those discussions now.</p>{bio}antony.walker@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><strong>Commenting on the Government&rsquo;s publication of a presentation on its vision for the future UK-EU&nbsp;Partnership around data protection, Antony Walker, deputy CEO at techUK, said:</strong></p> <p>We strongly support the UK Government&rsquo;s proposal for a data protection partnership. techUK has long argued that it is in the interests of both the UK and the EU27 to have continued alignment and a close relationship on data protection. The UK Data Protection Bill is due to receive Royal Assent today demonstrating the UK&rsquo;s commitment for close alignment with EU data protection rules. The slides published by the Government today make a strong and compelling case for why the UK and the EU should agree a close partnership on data protection.</p> <p>Data flows are a vital underpinning of international trade in a global digital economy.. The continued free flow of data, via mutual adequacy agreements, between the UK and the EU post-Brexit is crucial for organisations of every size and sector. The European data economy is expected to be worth &euro;739 billion by 2020 and data flows will be key to achieving that.</p> <p>The UK Information Commissioner&rsquo;s Office is well-respected at EU-level and has been a significant contributor to discussions around EU data protection policy. Continued ICO involvement on the European Data Protection Board is in the interest of both the EU and the UK. The ICO was a key player in the development of the upcoming GDPR and other EU data protection authorities often look to the ICO for leadership.</p> <p>techUK supports the Government&rsquo;s ambitions on data protection. We encourage the EU to recognise the mutual benefits of a continued close relationship on data protection, and to commit to having those discussions now.</p>{bio}antony.walker@techuk.org{/bio}</div> The great enabler: data and trade 2018-05-23T16:00:00+01:00 2018-05-23T16:00:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13201-the-great-enabler-data-and-trade CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Global%20network%20and%20data.jpg" style="float:right; height:267px; margin:5px; width:400px">In the modern world, few things enable businesses to thrive more than flows of data. This is not only about the big tech companies &ndash; the use and transfer of data is something that cuts across all sectors of a modern economy. From recruiters using personal data, or the transfer of financial information between companies and banks, to the flows of research data between universities across the world and much else in between, data flows are at the heart of all kinds of different activities.</p> <p>Indeed, the value of data flows to the global economy is greater than more traditional trade. <a href="https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/McKinsey/Business%20Functions/McKinsey%20Digital/Our%20Insights/Digital%20globalization%20The%20new%20era%20of%20global%20flows/MGI-Digital-globalization-Full-report.ashx"><span style="color:#0000FF">McKinsey Global Institute estimated</span></a> that the cross-border flows of data have increased world GDP by $2.8 trillion, a larger share than trade in goods. As more of the world digitises, this share looks set to grow further.</p> <p>However, despite the importance of data flows to the global economy, they have not significantly featured in trade deals. Recent European Union deals with <a href="http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2018/april/tradoc_156811.pdf"><span style="color:#0000FF">Mexico</span> </a>and <a href="https://eur-lex.europa.eu/resource.html?uri=cellar:cf1c4c42-4321-11e8-a9f4-01aa75ed71a1.0001.02/DOC_2&amp;format=PDF#page=186"><span style="color:#0000FF">Japan</span> </a>have only included review clauses for three years&rsquo; time on whether data flows should form a part of these deals. While the final text for the <a href="https://www.mfat.govt.nz/assets/Trans-Pacific-Partnership/Text/14.-Electronic-Commerce-Chapter.pdf"><span style="color:#0000FF">Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP)</span></a> goes further than this, it still leaves signatories a great deal of policy space to regulate their flows, provided measures are not disguised restrictions on trade or greater than what are required to achieve the policy objective.</p> <p>This failure to include effective provisions on data flows reflects the fact that debate is about much more than a restriction on trade. Instead, this about privacy and data protection, and how far businesses and states can do what they want with that data. There is a fundamental right to personal privacy in the EU, and the European Commission has long been clear that this right is <a href="https://www.ft.com/content/e489abba-0dc5-11e8-8eb7-42f857ea9f09"><span style="color:#0000FF">not something that can be negotiated away in a trade deal.</span></a></p> <p>If there is to be public trust in the benefits that tech can bring to their lives, then it is essential that rights to privacy are adequately protected. That is why techUK and the tech sector more broadly have been so supportive of GDPR, and we have supported the Commission&rsquo;s stance that privacy is not something up for negotiation.</p> <p>So how can governments reduce the barriers to the free flow of data, without undermining privacy and data protection? Removing measures requires that force data localisation is one key way. These require that data is not only processed according to privacy and protection regulations but that it must be physically stored within the same jurisdiction. As cloud services become much more integral to business models this is a highly restrictive measure, especially as the need to back up data means that it is often stored in multiple countries.</p> <p>The European Centre for International Policy Economy has recently found in its <a href="http://ecipe.org/dte/dte-report/"><span style="color:#0000FF">Digital Trade Restrictiveness Index</span></a> that &lsquo;the last decade has seen a worrying increasing trend of data localisation worldwide&rsquo;. While there were only 19 such measures imposed globally in 2000, that has now risen to 84 across the 64 economies the study covers. Measures like data localisation are ripe to be dealt with in trade deals and can be tackled without undermining rights to privacy.</p> <p>Ultimately, how to deal with the cross-border trade in data will be an ongoing balancing act. New ways to use and produce data will continually shift the terms of the debate and there is not likely to an easy answer to how to enable flows without compromising privacy. The most effective way forward, in the <a href="https://www.ft.com/content/6f0f41e4-47de-11e8-8ee8-cae73aab7ccb"><span style="color:#0000FF">absence of any larger agreement</span></a>, will be for governments across the globe will be to identify the specific measures and restrictions that are more purely restrictive, and work to remove or ameliorate them. One thing is for sure though, getting this balancing act right promises to unleash the potential of cross-border data flows to fuel further growth across the world.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}thomas.goldsmith@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Global%20network%20and%20data.jpg" style="float:right; height:267px; margin:5px; width:400px">In the modern world, few things enable businesses to thrive more than flows of data. This is not only about the big tech companies &ndash; the use and transfer of data is something that cuts across all sectors of a modern economy. From recruiters using personal data, or the transfer of financial information between companies and banks, to the flows of research data between universities across the world and much else in between, data flows are at the heart of all kinds of different activities.</p> <p>Indeed, the value of data flows to the global economy is greater than more traditional trade. <a href="https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/McKinsey/Business%20Functions/McKinsey%20Digital/Our%20Insights/Digital%20globalization%20The%20new%20era%20of%20global%20flows/MGI-Digital-globalization-Full-report.ashx"><span style="color:#0000FF">McKinsey Global Institute estimated</span></a> that the cross-border flows of data have increased world GDP by $2.8 trillion, a larger share than trade in goods. As more of the world digitises, this share looks set to grow further.</p> <p>However, despite the importance of data flows to the global economy, they have not significantly featured in trade deals. Recent European Union deals with <a href="http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/docs/2018/april/tradoc_156811.pdf"><span style="color:#0000FF">Mexico</span> </a>and <a href="https://eur-lex.europa.eu/resource.html?uri=cellar:cf1c4c42-4321-11e8-a9f4-01aa75ed71a1.0001.02/DOC_2&amp;format=PDF#page=186"><span style="color:#0000FF">Japan</span> </a>have only included review clauses for three years&rsquo; time on whether data flows should form a part of these deals. While the final text for the <a href="https://www.mfat.govt.nz/assets/Trans-Pacific-Partnership/Text/14.-Electronic-Commerce-Chapter.pdf"><span style="color:#0000FF">Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP)</span></a> goes further than this, it still leaves signatories a great deal of policy space to regulate their flows, provided measures are not disguised restrictions on trade or greater than what are required to achieve the policy objective.</p> <p>This failure to include effective provisions on data flows reflects the fact that debate is about much more than a restriction on trade. Instead, this about privacy and data protection, and how far businesses and states can do what they want with that data. There is a fundamental right to personal privacy in the EU, and the European Commission has long been clear that this right is <a href="https://www.ft.com/content/e489abba-0dc5-11e8-8eb7-42f857ea9f09"><span style="color:#0000FF">not something that can be negotiated away in a trade deal.</span></a></p> <p>If there is to be public trust in the benefits that tech can bring to their lives, then it is essential that rights to privacy are adequately protected. That is why techUK and the tech sector more broadly have been so supportive of GDPR, and we have supported the Commission&rsquo;s stance that privacy is not something up for negotiation.</p> <p>So how can governments reduce the barriers to the free flow of data, without undermining privacy and data protection? Removing measures requires that force data localisation is one key way. These require that data is not only processed according to privacy and protection regulations but that it must be physically stored within the same jurisdiction. As cloud services become much more integral to business models this is a highly restrictive measure, especially as the need to back up data means that it is often stored in multiple countries.</p> <p>The European Centre for International Policy Economy has recently found in its <a href="http://ecipe.org/dte/dte-report/"><span style="color:#0000FF">Digital Trade Restrictiveness Index</span></a> that &lsquo;the last decade has seen a worrying increasing trend of data localisation worldwide&rsquo;. While there were only 19 such measures imposed globally in 2000, that has now risen to 84 across the 64 economies the study covers. Measures like data localisation are ripe to be dealt with in trade deals and can be tackled without undermining rights to privacy.</p> <p>Ultimately, how to deal with the cross-border trade in data will be an ongoing balancing act. New ways to use and produce data will continually shift the terms of the debate and there is not likely to an easy answer to how to enable flows without compromising privacy. The most effective way forward, in the <a href="https://www.ft.com/content/6f0f41e4-47de-11e8-8ee8-cae73aab7ccb"><span style="color:#0000FF">absence of any larger agreement</span></a>, will be for governments across the globe will be to identify the specific measures and restrictions that are more purely restrictive, and work to remove or ameliorate them. One thing is for sure though, getting this balancing act right promises to unleash the potential of cross-border data flows to fuel further growth across the world.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}thomas.goldsmith@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> GD-VR – What does virtual reality mean for data protection? 2018-05-24T08:30:00+01:00 2018-05-24T08:30:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13200-gd-vr-what-does-virtual-reality-mean-for-data-protection CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Fotolia_138418624_Subscription_Monthly_XXL-min.jpg" style="float:right; height:217px; margin:5px; width:400px">As (G)D(PR)-Day approaches,&nbsp;almost every sector will have people squirrelled away looking at what it means for them. The media and entertainment world&nbsp;is&nbsp;no different and may be more exposed to GDPR risks as ad-funded models expand and their core business&nbsp;is getting content into people&rsquo;s homes, screens and memories.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Virtual reality is a current hot topic in this space and 2018 will be a big year for VR technology.&nbsp;Many&nbsp;lower-cost devices that need no supporting hardware are coming to market,&nbsp;and household names like Disney, Sky, ITV and the BBC are pumping serious money into virtual content. The new Google Daydream, Lenovo Mirage Solo, Samsung Gear VR and Oculus Go headsets will all duke it out at competitive prices,&nbsp;and with a stronger content offering 2018 will see some compelling consumer propositions and big sales figures.&nbsp;</p> <p>So,&nbsp;with potentially millions more people buying into this tech,&nbsp;what does it mean for data protection?&nbsp;</p> <p>In &lsquo;reality&rsquo; the VR business works like any other tech or media ecosystem in its reliance on interconnected software developers, content creators, manufacturers, distribution platforms and so on to work. Some firms are vertically integrated (see PlayStation VR) and other platforms (such as&nbsp;Samsung, Apple&nbsp;and&nbsp;Google) rely on tried-and-tested networks of third parties to deliver content in a way that fits their business models.&nbsp;</p> <p>In a liability sense this means VR shouldn&rsquo;t be treated differently from other entertainment mediums. The same considerations&nbsp;such as&nbsp;data processing, IP and&nbsp;licensing, consumer rights, product safety&nbsp;and&nbsp;GDPR&nbsp;still apply, with each supply chain actor holding some form of responsibility for compliance.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>However, where VR does pose a challenge is that devices and apps need to talk to each other to crunch a&nbsp;tonne&nbsp;of new data types that didn&rsquo;t exist before.&nbsp;Knowing where you look, how you move around, what direction you&rsquo;re facing etc are vital data sets for VR to work and are all Bits and Bytes that need to be processed to deliver an effective user experience. Whilst alot of this information will be&nbsp;anonymised&nbsp;and&nbsp;stored locally on the device, it is not a stretch to say this is some of the most personal of personal data and consumers may have a different attitude to how this data is used.&nbsp;</p> <p>Down the line, it is inevitable ad-tech land will develop innovative ways to&nbsp;commercialise&nbsp;this data,&nbsp;and it&rsquo;s reasonable to assume that because VR content is inherently more immersive&nbsp;than say a TV&nbsp;programme, an advert or intrusive content disrupting what an individual is doing in the virtual world&nbsp;will probably annoy or affront them more as it literally in their face.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>For those entering the VR market there&rsquo;s a real need to&nbsp;recognise&nbsp;that even if the liability regime is like other entertainment forms, the interaction with VR content is more intimate, immersive and intensive. This means companies wanting to build trust in this new tech should tread carefully and understand that consumers may have even higher expectations around how data generated in immersive experiences is handled.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}craig.melson@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Fotolia_138418624_Subscription_Monthly_XXL-min.jpg" style="float:right; height:217px; margin:5px; width:400px">As (G)D(PR)-Day approaches,&nbsp;almost every sector will have people squirrelled away looking at what it means for them. The media and entertainment world&nbsp;is&nbsp;no different and may be more exposed to GDPR risks as ad-funded models expand and their core business&nbsp;is getting content into people&rsquo;s homes, screens and memories.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Virtual reality is a current hot topic in this space and 2018 will be a big year for VR technology.&nbsp;Many&nbsp;lower-cost devices that need no supporting hardware are coming to market,&nbsp;and household names like Disney, Sky, ITV and the BBC are pumping serious money into virtual content. The new Google Daydream, Lenovo Mirage Solo, Samsung Gear VR and Oculus Go headsets will all duke it out at competitive prices,&nbsp;and with a stronger content offering 2018 will see some compelling consumer propositions and big sales figures.&nbsp;</p> <p>So,&nbsp;with potentially millions more people buying into this tech,&nbsp;what does it mean for data protection?&nbsp;</p> <p>In &lsquo;reality&rsquo; the VR business works like any other tech or media ecosystem in its reliance on interconnected software developers, content creators, manufacturers, distribution platforms and so on to work. Some firms are vertically integrated (see PlayStation VR) and other platforms (such as&nbsp;Samsung, Apple&nbsp;and&nbsp;Google) rely on tried-and-tested networks of third parties to deliver content in a way that fits their business models.&nbsp;</p> <p>In a liability sense this means VR shouldn&rsquo;t be treated differently from other entertainment mediums. The same considerations&nbsp;such as&nbsp;data processing, IP and&nbsp;licensing, consumer rights, product safety&nbsp;and&nbsp;GDPR&nbsp;still apply, with each supply chain actor holding some form of responsibility for compliance.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>However, where VR does pose a challenge is that devices and apps need to talk to each other to crunch a&nbsp;tonne&nbsp;of new data types that didn&rsquo;t exist before.&nbsp;Knowing where you look, how you move around, what direction you&rsquo;re facing etc are vital data sets for VR to work and are all Bits and Bytes that need to be processed to deliver an effective user experience. Whilst alot of this information will be&nbsp;anonymised&nbsp;and&nbsp;stored locally on the device, it is not a stretch to say this is some of the most personal of personal data and consumers may have a different attitude to how this data is used.&nbsp;</p> <p>Down the line, it is inevitable ad-tech land will develop innovative ways to&nbsp;commercialise&nbsp;this data,&nbsp;and it&rsquo;s reasonable to assume that because VR content is inherently more immersive&nbsp;than say a TV&nbsp;programme, an advert or intrusive content disrupting what an individual is doing in the virtual world&nbsp;will probably annoy or affront them more as it literally in their face.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>For those entering the VR market there&rsquo;s a real need to&nbsp;recognise&nbsp;that even if the liability regime is like other entertainment forms, the interaction with VR content is more intimate, immersive and intensive. This means companies wanting to build trust in this new tech should tread carefully and understand that consumers may have even higher expectations around how data generated in immersive experiences is handled.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}craig.melson@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> New technologies – an opportunity for digitally responsible businesses 2018-05-24T11:30:00+01:00 2018-05-24T11:30:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13198-new-technologies-an-opportunity-for-digitally-responsible-businesses CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Patrick%20Rowe%20Accenture.jpg" style="float:right; height:400px; margin:5px; width:320px">Digital technologies are dramatically transforming the way we live and work and the environment&nbsp;in which businesses operate. Exponential technologies such as Artificial Intelligence&nbsp;(AI),&nbsp;Internet of Things (IoT), and Blockchain, present significant economic and societal&nbsp;opportunities;&nbsp;equally they pose new challenges. For businesses, the key challenge is how&nbsp;to&nbsp;take advantage of these&nbsp;digitally enabled opportunities,&nbsp;while meeting new, complex and higher expectations, based on trust in how they operate in a digital world. These range from increased societal expectations and public scrutiny of&nbsp;how they run their businesses and&nbsp;the increasing imperative to develop and use technology&nbsp;responsibly and&nbsp;ethically in a world of fast digital&nbsp;innovation.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>With GDPR coming into force on 25th&nbsp;May, we are&nbsp;entering a new era of data privacy with arguably&nbsp;the highest standards and&nbsp;the widest global reach.&nbsp;Since adoption there has been&nbsp;much discussion about the&nbsp;negative&nbsp;impact&nbsp;the new rules&nbsp;will&nbsp;have&nbsp;on the digital economy and the uptake of data hungry technology, in Europe,&nbsp;and beyond.&nbsp;Many commentators now see&nbsp;GDPR&nbsp;as an opportunity to&nbsp;help meet consumer expectations and&nbsp;support the greater uptake of&nbsp;technology.&nbsp;It also enables companies to show that they are using and storing data responsibly.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Accenture believes&nbsp;that this&nbsp;will&nbsp;be the case and sees&nbsp;opportunities for&nbsp;digitally&nbsp;responsible companies&nbsp;to build a competitive advantage beyond compliance.&nbsp;This includes:&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <ul><li>Opportunities for leading companies to differentiate their data protection&nbsp;programmes&nbsp;and turn them into a competitive advantage.&nbsp;Accenture&nbsp;has&nbsp;a Client Data Protection&nbsp;Programme&nbsp;that is&nbsp;tailored to each client and&nbsp;is&nbsp;ISO certified. We&nbsp;have also&nbsp;refreshed our&nbsp;Code of&nbsp;Business&nbsp;Ethics to reflect the increased responsibility we,&nbsp;and our employees,&nbsp;have when managing data, especially in the use of new technologies. We consider ourselves as guardians of the data of our business partners, their employees and customers.&nbsp;&nbsp;</li> <li>Furthermore,&nbsp;when it comes to technology, we have made a&nbsp;public&nbsp;commitment&nbsp;to use&nbsp;data in a responsible&nbsp;way&nbsp;that goes beyond compliance,&nbsp;to power&nbsp;solutions such&nbsp;as&nbsp;advanced analytics and&nbsp;AI&nbsp;for Accenture, our clients and business partners.&#8239;When we deploy&nbsp;AI&nbsp;in our&nbsp;organisation&nbsp;we&nbsp;take&nbsp;responsibility for the governance, design, evolution, development, monitoring and performance of those systems. Our approach&nbsp;is human&nbsp;centric,&nbsp;and we ensure that we have a governance&nbsp;framework&nbsp;to&nbsp;allow for the decisions and actions taken by those systems to be&nbsp;secure, auditable and&nbsp;transparent&nbsp;-&nbsp;and result in outcomes,&nbsp;which are consistent with our core values, Code of Business Ethics and policies.&nbsp;</li> </ul><p>GDPR&nbsp;represents&nbsp;only&nbsp;a framework&nbsp;for the protection of personal data in&nbsp;the&nbsp;UK and the rest of Europe. Beyond 25th&nbsp;May, and as technology evolves,&nbsp;it will be important that business and regulators work together to&nbsp;further&nbsp;develop guidelines, codes of conduct, certification and other mechanisms to help&nbsp;business practically implement and demonstrate compliance with data privacy requirements.&nbsp;Of equal importance is that&nbsp;these mechanisms&nbsp;support consumer understanding and confidence in how their data is being used&nbsp;in the context of new technologies.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>One example is the provisions&nbsp;and guidance&nbsp;on automated decision-making&nbsp;under GDPR. It is important for businesses to have clear guidance on the parameters in which they are required to operate. Equally,&nbsp;it is important that they can provide clear explanations for the actions that AI systems take&nbsp;in a format&nbsp;that people understand.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As we enter this new&nbsp;era of data privacy, key to&nbsp;realising&nbsp;the economic and societal potential of new technologies will be&nbsp;enabling&nbsp;digitally&nbsp;responsible businesses and&nbsp;empower informed consumers.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a>&nbsp;</p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Patrick%20Rowe%20Accenture.jpg" style="float:right; height:400px; margin:5px; width:320px">Digital technologies are dramatically transforming the way we live and work and the environment&nbsp;in which businesses operate. Exponential technologies such as Artificial Intelligence&nbsp;(AI),&nbsp;Internet of Things (IoT), and Blockchain, present significant economic and societal&nbsp;opportunities;&nbsp;equally they pose new challenges. For businesses, the key challenge is how&nbsp;to&nbsp;take advantage of these&nbsp;digitally enabled opportunities,&nbsp;while meeting new, complex and higher expectations, based on trust in how they operate in a digital world. These range from increased societal expectations and public scrutiny of&nbsp;how they run their businesses and&nbsp;the increasing imperative to develop and use technology&nbsp;responsibly and&nbsp;ethically in a world of fast digital&nbsp;innovation.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>With GDPR coming into force on 25th&nbsp;May, we are&nbsp;entering a new era of data privacy with arguably&nbsp;the highest standards and&nbsp;the widest global reach.&nbsp;Since adoption there has been&nbsp;much discussion about the&nbsp;negative&nbsp;impact&nbsp;the new rules&nbsp;will&nbsp;have&nbsp;on the digital economy and the uptake of data hungry technology, in Europe,&nbsp;and beyond.&nbsp;Many commentators now see&nbsp;GDPR&nbsp;as an opportunity to&nbsp;help meet consumer expectations and&nbsp;support the greater uptake of&nbsp;technology.&nbsp;It also enables companies to show that they are using and storing data responsibly.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Accenture believes&nbsp;that this&nbsp;will&nbsp;be the case and sees&nbsp;opportunities for&nbsp;digitally&nbsp;responsible companies&nbsp;to build a competitive advantage beyond compliance.&nbsp;This includes:&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <ul><li>Opportunities for leading companies to differentiate their data protection&nbsp;programmes&nbsp;and turn them into a competitive advantage.&nbsp;Accenture&nbsp;has&nbsp;a Client Data Protection&nbsp;Programme&nbsp;that is&nbsp;tailored to each client and&nbsp;is&nbsp;ISO certified. We&nbsp;have also&nbsp;refreshed our&nbsp;Code of&nbsp;Business&nbsp;Ethics to reflect the increased responsibility we,&nbsp;and our employees,&nbsp;have when managing data, especially in the use of new technologies. We consider ourselves as guardians of the data of our business partners, their employees and customers.&nbsp;&nbsp;</li> <li>Furthermore,&nbsp;when it comes to technology, we have made a&nbsp;public&nbsp;commitment&nbsp;to use&nbsp;data in a responsible&nbsp;way&nbsp;that goes beyond compliance,&nbsp;to power&nbsp;solutions such&nbsp;as&nbsp;advanced analytics and&nbsp;AI&nbsp;for Accenture, our clients and business partners.&#8239;When we deploy&nbsp;AI&nbsp;in our&nbsp;organisation&nbsp;we&nbsp;take&nbsp;responsibility for the governance, design, evolution, development, monitoring and performance of those systems. Our approach&nbsp;is human&nbsp;centric,&nbsp;and we ensure that we have a governance&nbsp;framework&nbsp;to&nbsp;allow for the decisions and actions taken by those systems to be&nbsp;secure, auditable and&nbsp;transparent&nbsp;-&nbsp;and result in outcomes,&nbsp;which are consistent with our core values, Code of Business Ethics and policies.&nbsp;</li> </ul><p>GDPR&nbsp;represents&nbsp;only&nbsp;a framework&nbsp;for the protection of personal data in&nbsp;the&nbsp;UK and the rest of Europe. Beyond 25th&nbsp;May, and as technology evolves,&nbsp;it will be important that business and regulators work together to&nbsp;further&nbsp;develop guidelines, codes of conduct, certification and other mechanisms to help&nbsp;business practically implement and demonstrate compliance with data privacy requirements.&nbsp;Of equal importance is that&nbsp;these mechanisms&nbsp;support consumer understanding and confidence in how their data is being used&nbsp;in the context of new technologies.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>One example is the provisions&nbsp;and guidance&nbsp;on automated decision-making&nbsp;under GDPR. It is important for businesses to have clear guidance on the parameters in which they are required to operate. Equally,&nbsp;it is important that they can provide clear explanations for the actions that AI systems take&nbsp;in a format&nbsp;that people understand.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As we enter this new&nbsp;era of data privacy, key to&nbsp;realising&nbsp;the economic and societal potential of new technologies will be&nbsp;enabling&nbsp;digitally&nbsp;responsible businesses and&nbsp;empower informed consumers.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a>&nbsp;</p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Accountability under the GDPR 2018-05-24T13:00:00+01:00 2018-05-24T13:00:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13197-accountability-under-the-gdpr CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Guy_Cohen_Privitar.jpg" style="float:left; height:350px; margin:5px; width:350px">For many,&nbsp;of all the changes the GDPR brings in,&nbsp;the new consent requirements are&nbsp;the most stressful. Not only&nbsp;is&nbsp;consent&nbsp;harder to obtain, but&nbsp;using it can strengthen data subjects&rsquo; rights, and is no longer an option for some purposes. For instance, the data subject&rsquo;s right to erasure is stronger if processing&nbsp;on the basis of consent.&nbsp;And employers may find they can&rsquo;t use consent to process&nbsp;their&nbsp;employee&rsquo;s&nbsp;data due to the inherent power imbalance.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As a result, many organisations are exploring whether any of the other five legal bases for processing can be used instead,&nbsp;in particular the&nbsp;legitimate interest basis.&nbsp;Part of the appeal is that, as&nbsp;the ICO state in their&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/lawful-basis-for-processing/legitimate-interests/"><span style="color:#0000FF">recent guidance</span></a>,&nbsp;&ldquo;Legitimate interests is the most flexible lawful basis&rdquo;.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>To&nbsp;use this basis, controllers must carry out a balancing test where they&nbsp;weigh their interests&nbsp;against any potential harms to the individual, and put in place safeguards to protect the individual:&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Where the processing&hellip;&nbsp;is not based on the data subject&rsquo;s consent...&nbsp;the controller shall...&nbsp;take into account...&nbsp;the existence of appropriate safeguards...&rdquo;&#8239;Article 6, GDPR&nbsp;</p> <p>Importantly, if an initial analysis&nbsp;finds that the potential harms outweigh the&nbsp;controller&rsquo;s interests, the controller can add additional safeguards, reducing the risk,&nbsp;to&nbsp;potentially sway the balance in their favour.&nbsp;As the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.huntonprivacyblog.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/28/2014/04/wp217_en.pdf"><span style="color:#0000FF">EU&nbsp;Article 29 Working Party guidance&nbsp;from 2014</span></a>&nbsp;states:&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;&hellip;it is important to highlight the special role that safeguards may play in reducing the undue impact on the data subjects, and thereby changing the balance of rights and interests to the extent that the data controller&rsquo;s legitimate interests will not be overridden.&rdquo;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>The ability to evaluate privacy risk and implement&nbsp;effective&nbsp;safeguards is therefore key to processing on the basis of a legitimate interest.&nbsp;But it is not just&nbsp;relevant for legal basis. Safeguards are also required for compliance with data protection by design, automated decision making,&nbsp;to&nbsp;mitigate&nbsp;high risk processing uncovered by a DPIA, and many other areas. Fundamentally,&nbsp;the GDPR&nbsp;makes data controllers responsible for any harms&nbsp;resulting&nbsp;from their processing&nbsp;and drives them to&nbsp;implement&nbsp;appropriate and&nbsp;proportionate&nbsp;safeguards.&nbsp;This means organisations need to&nbsp;think about safeguards when designing data protection into their systems,&nbsp;analyse specific risks&nbsp;(through DPIAs), and then add further&nbsp;safeguards&nbsp;as&nbsp;necessary.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>The GDPR doesn&rsquo;t define safeguards, so anything which&nbsp;reduces&nbsp;the risk of harm&nbsp;could be considered a safeguard.&nbsp;Generally, safeguards&nbsp;deliver&nbsp;on&nbsp;<a href="https://www.enisa.europa.eu/publications/privacy-and-data-protection-by-design"><span style="color:#0000FF">ENISA&rsquo;s&nbsp;eight privacy by design strategies</span></a>, which are;&nbsp;Minimise, Separate, Aggregate, Hide, Inform, Control, Demonstrate and Enforce.&nbsp;These strategies can be fulfilled though technological safeguards, legal safeguards, procedural safeguards, or other approaches.&nbsp;For instance,&nbsp;a&nbsp;data&nbsp;controller&nbsp;might be&nbsp;concerned about sharing data with&nbsp;a partner&nbsp;and&nbsp;want&nbsp;to minimise&nbsp;what the&nbsp;partner&nbsp;can use the data for.&nbsp;They could&nbsp;restrict use by contract, providing a legal safeguard.&nbsp;Alternatively, or additionally,&nbsp;they could&nbsp;share&nbsp;a copy of the data with direct identifiers removed, and&nbsp;other&nbsp;values blurred,&nbsp;so&nbsp;the partner sees no more detail than necessary.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As the need for effective safeguards increases, technological safeguards&nbsp;will become more important. Partially this is because they offer scalability and consistency, but also because&nbsp;of&nbsp;significant&nbsp;recent&nbsp;advances in&nbsp;privacy engineering.&nbsp;There is now&nbsp;a wider&nbsp;range of&nbsp;more powerful&nbsp;technological safeguards&nbsp;that are feasible to deploy in real scenarios.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>To take two examples, differential privacy&nbsp;(delivering&nbsp;&lsquo;Aggregate&rsquo;) and&nbsp;homomorphic encryption&nbsp;(delivering&nbsp;&lsquo;Hide&rsquo;)&nbsp;have both moved from research to commercial applications in&nbsp;recent&nbsp;years.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Differential privacy&nbsp;is a formal way of thinking about privacy which&nbsp;<a href="https://privacytools.seas.harvard.edu/files/privacytools/files/pedagogical-document-dp_new.pdf"><span style="color:#0000FF">&ldquo;essentially protects an individual&rsquo;s information as if her information were not used in the analysis&rdquo;</span></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;provides&nbsp;provable privacy&nbsp;guarantees.&nbsp;Differential privacy&nbsp;will be&nbsp;<a href="https://privacytools.seas.harvard.edu/why-census-bureau-adopted-differential-privacy-2020-census-population"><span style="color:#0000FF">used by the US Census</span></a>&nbsp;for the publication of their results in 2020, and&nbsp;<a href="https://www.privitar.com/privitar-lens"><span style="color:#0000FF">can be used</span></a>&nbsp;to allow privacy preserving insights to sensitive data sets.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Homomorphic encryption allows data to be usefully processed whilst encrypted.&nbsp;Fully homomorphic encryption is still very computationally expensive,&nbsp;but&nbsp;partially homomorphic encryption, where only some kinds of processing are supported,&nbsp;is viable and in use. For instance, partially homomorphic encryption&nbsp;<a href="https://www.privitar.com/securelink"><span style="color:#0000FF">can be used</span></a>&nbsp;to link datasets on encrypted identifiers.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>To find out more about these technologies, and others, please contact us at&nbsp;<a href="https://www.privitar.com/contact"><span style="color:#0000FF">https://www.privitar.com/contact</span></a>.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Guy_Cohen_Privitar.jpg" style="float:left; height:350px; margin:5px; width:350px">For many,&nbsp;of all the changes the GDPR brings in,&nbsp;the new consent requirements are&nbsp;the most stressful. Not only&nbsp;is&nbsp;consent&nbsp;harder to obtain, but&nbsp;using it can strengthen data subjects&rsquo; rights, and is no longer an option for some purposes. For instance, the data subject&rsquo;s right to erasure is stronger if processing&nbsp;on the basis of consent.&nbsp;And employers may find they can&rsquo;t use consent to process&nbsp;their&nbsp;employee&rsquo;s&nbsp;data due to the inherent power imbalance.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As a result, many organisations are exploring whether any of the other five legal bases for processing can be used instead,&nbsp;in particular the&nbsp;legitimate interest basis.&nbsp;Part of the appeal is that, as&nbsp;the ICO state in their&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/lawful-basis-for-processing/legitimate-interests/"><span style="color:#0000FF">recent guidance</span></a>,&nbsp;&ldquo;Legitimate interests is the most flexible lawful basis&rdquo;.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>To&nbsp;use this basis, controllers must carry out a balancing test where they&nbsp;weigh their interests&nbsp;against any potential harms to the individual, and put in place safeguards to protect the individual:&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Where the processing&hellip;&nbsp;is not based on the data subject&rsquo;s consent...&nbsp;the controller shall...&nbsp;take into account...&nbsp;the existence of appropriate safeguards...&rdquo;&#8239;Article 6, GDPR&nbsp;</p> <p>Importantly, if an initial analysis&nbsp;finds that the potential harms outweigh the&nbsp;controller&rsquo;s interests, the controller can add additional safeguards, reducing the risk,&nbsp;to&nbsp;potentially sway the balance in their favour.&nbsp;As the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.huntonprivacyblog.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/28/2014/04/wp217_en.pdf"><span style="color:#0000FF">EU&nbsp;Article 29 Working Party guidance&nbsp;from 2014</span></a>&nbsp;states:&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;&hellip;it is important to highlight the special role that safeguards may play in reducing the undue impact on the data subjects, and thereby changing the balance of rights and interests to the extent that the data controller&rsquo;s legitimate interests will not be overridden.&rdquo;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>The ability to evaluate privacy risk and implement&nbsp;effective&nbsp;safeguards is therefore key to processing on the basis of a legitimate interest.&nbsp;But it is not just&nbsp;relevant for legal basis. Safeguards are also required for compliance with data protection by design, automated decision making,&nbsp;to&nbsp;mitigate&nbsp;high risk processing uncovered by a DPIA, and many other areas. Fundamentally,&nbsp;the GDPR&nbsp;makes data controllers responsible for any harms&nbsp;resulting&nbsp;from their processing&nbsp;and drives them to&nbsp;implement&nbsp;appropriate and&nbsp;proportionate&nbsp;safeguards.&nbsp;This means organisations need to&nbsp;think about safeguards when designing data protection into their systems,&nbsp;analyse specific risks&nbsp;(through DPIAs), and then add further&nbsp;safeguards&nbsp;as&nbsp;necessary.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>The GDPR doesn&rsquo;t define safeguards, so anything which&nbsp;reduces&nbsp;the risk of harm&nbsp;could be considered a safeguard.&nbsp;Generally, safeguards&nbsp;deliver&nbsp;on&nbsp;<a href="https://www.enisa.europa.eu/publications/privacy-and-data-protection-by-design"><span style="color:#0000FF">ENISA&rsquo;s&nbsp;eight privacy by design strategies</span></a>, which are;&nbsp;Minimise, Separate, Aggregate, Hide, Inform, Control, Demonstrate and Enforce.&nbsp;These strategies can be fulfilled though technological safeguards, legal safeguards, procedural safeguards, or other approaches.&nbsp;For instance,&nbsp;a&nbsp;data&nbsp;controller&nbsp;might be&nbsp;concerned about sharing data with&nbsp;a partner&nbsp;and&nbsp;want&nbsp;to minimise&nbsp;what the&nbsp;partner&nbsp;can use the data for.&nbsp;They could&nbsp;restrict use by contract, providing a legal safeguard.&nbsp;Alternatively, or additionally,&nbsp;they could&nbsp;share&nbsp;a copy of the data with direct identifiers removed, and&nbsp;other&nbsp;values blurred,&nbsp;so&nbsp;the partner sees no more detail than necessary.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As the need for effective safeguards increases, technological safeguards&nbsp;will become more important. Partially this is because they offer scalability and consistency, but also because&nbsp;of&nbsp;significant&nbsp;recent&nbsp;advances in&nbsp;privacy engineering.&nbsp;There is now&nbsp;a wider&nbsp;range of&nbsp;more powerful&nbsp;technological safeguards&nbsp;that are feasible to deploy in real scenarios.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>To take two examples, differential privacy&nbsp;(delivering&nbsp;&lsquo;Aggregate&rsquo;) and&nbsp;homomorphic encryption&nbsp;(delivering&nbsp;&lsquo;Hide&rsquo;)&nbsp;have both moved from research to commercial applications in&nbsp;recent&nbsp;years.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Differential privacy&nbsp;is a formal way of thinking about privacy which&nbsp;<a href="https://privacytools.seas.harvard.edu/files/privacytools/files/pedagogical-document-dp_new.pdf"><span style="color:#0000FF">&ldquo;essentially protects an individual&rsquo;s information as if her information were not used in the analysis&rdquo;</span></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;provides&nbsp;provable privacy&nbsp;guarantees.&nbsp;Differential privacy&nbsp;will be&nbsp;<a href="https://privacytools.seas.harvard.edu/why-census-bureau-adopted-differential-privacy-2020-census-population"><span style="color:#0000FF">used by the US Census</span></a>&nbsp;for the publication of their results in 2020, and&nbsp;<a href="https://www.privitar.com/privitar-lens"><span style="color:#0000FF">can be used</span></a>&nbsp;to allow privacy preserving insights to sensitive data sets.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Homomorphic encryption allows data to be usefully processed whilst encrypted.&nbsp;Fully homomorphic encryption is still very computationally expensive,&nbsp;but&nbsp;partially homomorphic encryption, where only some kinds of processing are supported,&nbsp;is viable and in use. For instance, partially homomorphic encryption&nbsp;<a href="https://www.privitar.com/securelink"><span style="color:#0000FF">can be used</span></a>&nbsp;to link datasets on encrypted identifiers.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>To find out more about these technologies, and others, please contact us at&nbsp;<a href="https://www.privitar.com/contact"><span style="color:#0000FF">https://www.privitar.com/contact</span></a>.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Data protection in translation services 2018-05-24T10:00:00+01:00 2018-05-24T10:00:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13196-data-protection-in-translation-services CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Joanne%20Taylor%20BW.jpg" style="float:right; height:267px; margin:5px; width:400px">English is everywhere now, so is translation still necessary or important?</p> <p>Well, not everyone speaks English, and surely everyone would rather be communicated with in their own native language.&nbsp;People always respond better to the language they grew up speaking, and to effectively sell to people, it&rsquo;s not enough to speak a language that they understand (especially if their understanding is limited); you must speak to them in the language their heart speaks.</p> <p>English may be the lingua-franca now, but that may not always be the case. Other languages are becoming more widely spoken as developing countries start to emerge, and as more people have access to the internet. Whilst most of the world&rsquo;s web content used to be in English, that&rsquo;s no longer the case. Languages such as Mandarin, Russian, Arabic and Spanish are climbing the ranks, and will soon collectively take over English as the world&rsquo;s most popular online languages.</p> <p>So if you&rsquo;re trying to spread your message online, you&rsquo;re going to need to consider translation services. But even your Language Service Provider (LSP) has GDPR rules to take into consideration&hellip;</p> <h4>5 things to ask your LSP</h4> <p>Think about the amount of data you share with your Language Service Provider. It&rsquo;s vital to ensure they are complying with all aspects of GDPR.</p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;1. Are you operating in a GDPR member state?</p> <p>Ensure your LSP operates in a member state that has signed up to the GDPR and complies with all the relevant regulations. This doesn&rsquo;t just apply to the LSP itself, but to all sub-contractors too, such as linguists, and also to the jurisdictions in which the company&rsquo;s servers are based.</p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;2. Do you work within a secure translation management system?</p> <p>It will no longer be possible &ndash; nor is it good practice &ndash; to allow your LSP to send your files for translation via an unsecured email address. A reputable LSP &ndash; and one which complies with the GDPR &ndash; will work within a secure translation management system where translators use a secure server-based environment to complete their work, and are unable to download any files to their personal devices.</p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;3. Do you work with NDAs?</p> <p>Non-Disclosure Agreements are common practice for a lot of organisations, but they&rsquo;re becoming more important than ever now. A Language Service Provider who refuses to sign an NDA, or does not already have their own in place, will not be complying with the GDPR. It is also important to ensure the linguists in question are also prepared to sign these agreements.</p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;4. What security standards do you have in place?</p> <p>Standards and accreditations are a sure-fire way of knowing that your LSP is reputable and compliant. You should be looking out for security accreditations such as ISO 27001 (information security). Your LSP should also be regularly training their staff in Data Protection, and should have up-to-date material with regards to this new standard.</p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;5. Are your tools and technology secure?</p> <p>Neither your organisation nor your LSP should be using free/open-source machine translation engines such as Google Translate, as you are giving the system a worldwide license to use, host, store and publish the content (definitely not GDPR compliant). Your LSP should be using a secure machine translation environment, which is only available to you and the LSP.</p> <p>Don&rsquo;t be afraid to ask your LSP about their data security infrastructure, workflows and policies. It&rsquo;s all well-and-good your own organisation being GDPR compliant, but if your suppliers are failing to conform, you will ultimately be the one who is responsible for a potential data breach.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Joanne%20Taylor%20BW.jpg" style="float:right; height:267px; margin:5px; width:400px">English is everywhere now, so is translation still necessary or important?</p> <p>Well, not everyone speaks English, and surely everyone would rather be communicated with in their own native language.&nbsp;People always respond better to the language they grew up speaking, and to effectively sell to people, it&rsquo;s not enough to speak a language that they understand (especially if their understanding is limited); you must speak to them in the language their heart speaks.</p> <p>English may be the lingua-franca now, but that may not always be the case. Other languages are becoming more widely spoken as developing countries start to emerge, and as more people have access to the internet. Whilst most of the world&rsquo;s web content used to be in English, that&rsquo;s no longer the case. Languages such as Mandarin, Russian, Arabic and Spanish are climbing the ranks, and will soon collectively take over English as the world&rsquo;s most popular online languages.</p> <p>So if you&rsquo;re trying to spread your message online, you&rsquo;re going to need to consider translation services. But even your Language Service Provider (LSP) has GDPR rules to take into consideration&hellip;</p> <h4>5 things to ask your LSP</h4> <p>Think about the amount of data you share with your Language Service Provider. It&rsquo;s vital to ensure they are complying with all aspects of GDPR.</p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;1. Are you operating in a GDPR member state?</p> <p>Ensure your LSP operates in a member state that has signed up to the GDPR and complies with all the relevant regulations. This doesn&rsquo;t just apply to the LSP itself, but to all sub-contractors too, such as linguists, and also to the jurisdictions in which the company&rsquo;s servers are based.</p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;2. Do you work within a secure translation management system?</p> <p>It will no longer be possible &ndash; nor is it good practice &ndash; to allow your LSP to send your files for translation via an unsecured email address. A reputable LSP &ndash; and one which complies with the GDPR &ndash; will work within a secure translation management system where translators use a secure server-based environment to complete their work, and are unable to download any files to their personal devices.</p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;3. Do you work with NDAs?</p> <p>Non-Disclosure Agreements are common practice for a lot of organisations, but they&rsquo;re becoming more important than ever now. A Language Service Provider who refuses to sign an NDA, or does not already have their own in place, will not be complying with the GDPR. It is also important to ensure the linguists in question are also prepared to sign these agreements.</p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;4. What security standards do you have in place?</p> <p>Standards and accreditations are a sure-fire way of knowing that your LSP is reputable and compliant. You should be looking out for security accreditations such as ISO 27001 (information security). Your LSP should also be regularly training their staff in Data Protection, and should have up-to-date material with regards to this new standard.</p> <p>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;5. Are your tools and technology secure?</p> <p>Neither your organisation nor your LSP should be using free/open-source machine translation engines such as Google Translate, as you are giving the system a worldwide license to use, host, store and publish the content (definitely not GDPR compliant). Your LSP should be using a secure machine translation environment, which is only available to you and the LSP.</p> <p>Don&rsquo;t be afraid to ask your LSP about their data security infrastructure, workflows and policies. It&rsquo;s all well-and-good your own organisation being GDPR compliant, but if your suppliers are failing to conform, you will ultimately be the one who is responsible for a potential data breach.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> GDPR and AI – help or hinderance? 2018-05-24T14:30:00+01:00 2018-05-24T14:30:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13195-gdpr-and-ai-help-or-hinderance CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>At techUK, we are discussing the steps that need to be taken to ensure the UK can realise the full economic and social power of AI. With AI estimated to be worth an additional &pound;232 billion to the UK economy, it is important that the right environment is created that supports the development, adoption and use of increasingly automated, intelligent, data driven AI systems and technologies. A key question I am often asked is whether the introduction of the GDPR will in fact help or hinder the growth of the UK&rsquo;s AI industry and adoption of AI technologies.</p> <p>As GDPR has not even come into effect yet it is still not clear what impact it will have on the future development of AI technologies. However, what is clear now is that GDPR provides the legal and regulatory framework and foundations on which innovative, intelligent, increasingly autonomous AI technologies will be developed, deployed and applied. In fact, the review of the current European data protection legislation was conducted to ensure that Europe&rsquo;s data protection legal framework remains up to date with the development of advanced, digital data driven technologies such as machine learning. The inclusion of Article 22 provides individuals with a right not to be subjected to automated decision making in particular circumstances. In this example, the GDPR has been developed with machine learning and AI technologies in mind. It is also an example of how the GDPR will support the development of AI by providing data subjects with the ability to make decisions about how their data is being used as AI technologies evolve. This is key to building greater trust and confidence in the use of AI across both the public and private sectors.</p> <p>Another way the GDPR will support the development of AI is through the introduction of a right to data portability. Data is vital to the ability of AI systems to function, learn and develop. The capability for individuals to gain access to and share data with organisations that can then apply AI to unlock hidden insights and value from the data&nbsp;will enable AI systems to learn and evolve more quickly due to a greater availability of datasets.</p> <p>Overall, GDPR will provide companies looking to develop and deploy AI systems with a clear legal framework to address data protection issues and concerns that may be raised by AI. However, as AI continues to develop many of the questions and concerns that could be raised will go beyond data protection and privacy. It is not yet clear whether the GDPR will be able to address the ethical questions and concerns being raised by the increased use of AI.</p> <p>The development and deployment of machine learning and Artificial Intelligence technologies is leading to a much broader ethical discussion about how data-driven decisions are being made by autonomous, intelligent machines and whether these decisions are fair, ethical and unbiased. Clearly, the starting point for these discussions must always be GDPR. However, moving forward we may need to consider whether there could be gaps in the legal framework that need to be addressed. A key question to be discussed is whether the GDPR provides a framework business need to embed ethical decision-making into normal business practices or whether something more is needed to help companies ask, discuss and consider the right ethical questions as well as think and act ethically every day. This is a key issue that techUK will be exploring at a panel of industry leaders at the upcoming <a href="https://cogx.co/"><span style="color:#0000FF">Cogx18 &ldquo;Festival of all things AI&rdquo; conference</span></a> on the 11th June.</p> <p>With the technology sector at the heart of driving the UK towards an increasingly AI-driven economy and society, it is industry that is being looked to for clarity and answers on ethical questions. techUK is working hard to bring together technology industry leaders and those involved in the data ethics debate to discuss the key questions being raised today and consider how the tech sector should be looking to respond. In December&nbsp;we will hold techUK&rsquo;s second annual Digital Ethics Summit which will consider the progress that has been made over the last twelve months on this important issue and consider the progress made to build the capacity and capabilities needed to recognise, identify and address ethical issues and concerns. It will also consider whether the practical action that has been taken is enough, including the implementation of the GDPR, and discuss what more may be needed to ensure the ethical questions raised by the development and use of AI technologies can be addressed moving forward.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}sue.daley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>At techUK, we are discussing the steps that need to be taken to ensure the UK can realise the full economic and social power of AI. With AI estimated to be worth an additional &pound;232 billion to the UK economy, it is important that the right environment is created that supports the development, adoption and use of increasingly automated, intelligent, data driven AI systems and technologies. A key question I am often asked is whether the introduction of the GDPR will in fact help or hinder the growth of the UK&rsquo;s AI industry and adoption of AI technologies.</p> <p>As GDPR has not even come into effect yet it is still not clear what impact it will have on the future development of AI technologies. However, what is clear now is that GDPR provides the legal and regulatory framework and foundations on which innovative, intelligent, increasingly autonomous AI technologies will be developed, deployed and applied. In fact, the review of the current European data protection legislation was conducted to ensure that Europe&rsquo;s data protection legal framework remains up to date with the development of advanced, digital data driven technologies such as machine learning. The inclusion of Article 22 provides individuals with a right not to be subjected to automated decision making in particular circumstances. In this example, the GDPR has been developed with machine learning and AI technologies in mind. It is also an example of how the GDPR will support the development of AI by providing data subjects with the ability to make decisions about how their data is being used as AI technologies evolve. This is key to building greater trust and confidence in the use of AI across both the public and private sectors.</p> <p>Another way the GDPR will support the development of AI is through the introduction of a right to data portability. Data is vital to the ability of AI systems to function, learn and develop. The capability for individuals to gain access to and share data with organisations that can then apply AI to unlock hidden insights and value from the data&nbsp;will enable AI systems to learn and evolve more quickly due to a greater availability of datasets.</p> <p>Overall, GDPR will provide companies looking to develop and deploy AI systems with a clear legal framework to address data protection issues and concerns that may be raised by AI. However, as AI continues to develop many of the questions and concerns that could be raised will go beyond data protection and privacy. It is not yet clear whether the GDPR will be able to address the ethical questions and concerns being raised by the increased use of AI.</p> <p>The development and deployment of machine learning and Artificial Intelligence technologies is leading to a much broader ethical discussion about how data-driven decisions are being made by autonomous, intelligent machines and whether these decisions are fair, ethical and unbiased. Clearly, the starting point for these discussions must always be GDPR. However, moving forward we may need to consider whether there could be gaps in the legal framework that need to be addressed. A key question to be discussed is whether the GDPR provides a framework business need to embed ethical decision-making into normal business practices or whether something more is needed to help companies ask, discuss and consider the right ethical questions as well as think and act ethically every day. This is a key issue that techUK will be exploring at a panel of industry leaders at the upcoming <a href="https://cogx.co/"><span style="color:#0000FF">Cogx18 &ldquo;Festival of all things AI&rdquo; conference</span></a> on the 11th June.</p> <p>With the technology sector at the heart of driving the UK towards an increasingly AI-driven economy and society, it is industry that is being looked to for clarity and answers on ethical questions. techUK is working hard to bring together technology industry leaders and those involved in the data ethics debate to discuss the key questions being raised today and consider how the tech sector should be looking to respond. In December&nbsp;we will hold techUK&rsquo;s second annual Digital Ethics Summit which will consider the progress that has been made over the last twelve months on this important issue and consider the progress made to build the capacity and capabilities needed to recognise, identify and address ethical issues and concerns. It will also consider whether the practical action that has been taken is enough, including the implementation of the GDPR, and discuss what more may be needed to ensure the ethical questions raised by the development and use of AI technologies can be addressed moving forward.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}sue.daley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Countdown to GDPR 2018-05-24T16:00:00+01:00 2018-05-24T16:00:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13194-countdown-to-gdpr CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img style="float: left; height: 267px; margin: 5px; width: 400px;" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/gdpr_ico.jpeg" alt=""><a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/blog-post/countdown-gdpr"><span style="color: #0000ff;"><em>This blog was originally posted on the NCSC website.</em></span></a></p> <p>Anybody who is involved in cyber security or data protection will be acutely aware that the General Data Protection Regulation - better known simply as GDPR - comes into force on Friday, 25&nbsp;May. We have worked very closely with the<a href="https://ico.org.uk/"><span style="color: #0000ff;">&nbsp;Information Commissioners Office&nbsp;(ICO) </span></a>to develop a set of a set of&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/gdpr-security-outcomes"><span style="color: #0000ff;">GDPR Security Outcomes</span></a>, which we published last week.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>GDPR and cyber</strong></p> <p>If you have tried to read and understand the relevant articles described in&nbsp;<a href="https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/law-topic/data-protection/data-protection-eu_en"><span style="color: #0000ff;">the Regulation</span></a>,&nbsp;well done. I personally have found it really hard work to break it apart, summarise what security measures it&nbsp;really&nbsp;seeks, and then overlay good cyber security practice to meet those requirements. Thankfully, the ICO really do understand the detail, and so we have worked together to describe what the regulation requires and provide an overview on what sorts of cyber security measures we expect those organisations processing personal data to have in place. We have published this work as a set of&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/gdpr-security-outcomes"><span style="color: #0000ff;">Security Outcomes required for GDPR</span></a>, together with some relevant overarching&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/GDPR"><span style="color: #0000ff;">GDPR information</span></a>. Whilst we have a shared interest with the ICO on cyber security, of course they are the lead for the GDPR and you should consult their&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/"><span style="color: #0000ff;">website</span></a>&nbsp;for any general GDPR questions or needs that you might have.</p> <p><strong>What GDPR says about cyber</strong></p> <p>Now I'm going to quote parts of the Regulation here&nbsp; - so bear with me - but I will give some context as well.</p> <p>There is an overarching requirement that basically says that you need to protect personal information. It states that personal information must be:</p> <p><em>"processed in a manner that ensures appropriate security of the personal data, including protection against unauthorised or unlawful processing and against accidental loss, destruction or damage, using appropriate technical or organisational measures"</em></p> <p>The key thing to note here is that personal information being correct and available is in scope - not just protecting its confidentiality.</p> <p>One thing that I personally like in the GDPR (OK so it's a little bit nerdy to have a favourite part of data protection legislation)&nbsp;is that it specifically requires&nbsp;organisations&nbsp;to think about security as you design services as well as at the point when processing happens. It means that services must be designed with security in mind&nbsp;<strong>from the outset</strong>,&nbsp;and that you have to keep them secure<strong> through the whole lifecycle</strong>. You can't just develop services and allow security debt (when security corners are cut to meet to meet business delivery) to accumulate.</p> <p>The Regulation refers in a number of places to:</p> <p><em>"appropriate technical and organisational measures"</em></p> <p>It emphasises that you need to take a risk managed approach to security that is influenced by the risk to the individuals whose data you are processing, the state of the art (of technology) and cost. 'Appropriate' really does depend; we understand that<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/blog-post/please-stop-saying-it-depends"><span style="color: #0000ff;">&nbsp;saying 'it depends' can be really frustrating</span></a>&nbsp;and people need a bit more certainty than that. Whilst the GDPR takes this 'it depends' approach, we have worked with the ICO to develop Security Outcomes that we would jointly expect any organisation to meet.</p> <p><strong>What are Security Outcomes?</strong></p> <p>As the name suggest these are outcomes that any organisation should seek to achieve with regards to cyber security. They do not themselves carry mandatory status, although they are our joint approximation of what&nbsp;<strong>appropriate</strong>&nbsp;means under the Regulation.&nbsp;You'll find that the outcomes do not say precisely what to do with regards to cyber security. That's deliberate as it's&nbsp;not&nbsp;for us (neither the NCSC nor the ICO) to tell you what technologies to use, nor to limit your choices in how you chose to protect them. Equally we need the outcomes to work for organisations of many sizes and complexity.&nbsp;Overall this was probably the hardest challenge and we'd like to hear your feedback if there are areas that don't quite work (and the reasons of course).</p> <p>As we wrote the outcomes, we attempted to define the&nbsp;minimal set of measures&nbsp;that represent decent practice with regards to security. We do not believe we have described anything that is unreasonable, or should be surprising to you. Again let us know if you feel this isn't the case. Defining what we believe to be good practice means that existing guidance remains appropriate and can help you design measures that meet the outcomes. There is a lot of existing material&nbsp; - including our own&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/smallbusiness"><span style="color: #0000ff;">Small Business Guide</span></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/security/"><span style="color: #0000ff;">ICO's guidance on GDPR</span></a>&nbsp;- which you may find helpful.</p> <p>We know that good security isn't just about putting technical mitigations in place. The outcomes are aligned to 4 top level aims which cover how you manage security, protecting personal data from cyber attack, detecting incidents and minimising the impact if an incident does happen.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Existing schemes and certifications</strong></p> <p>I'm asked a lot whether having&nbsp;Cyber Essentials&nbsp;means you are compliant with the GDPR cyber security requirements. Certainly having <a href="https://www.cyberessentials.ncsc.gov.uk/"><span style="color: #0000ff;">Cyber Essentials</span></a> certification is a&nbsp;good thing and it will show that you take protecting yourself from cyber attack seriously. I wholeheartedly recommend it but there are other areas, outside the scope of Cyber Essentials, where you need to protect personal information too. A good example might be protecting data at rest on a laptop. The same logic applies to other certifications you might have; they are part of the picture, but you must still ensure that you are comprehensively protecting personal data.</p> <p><strong>If something goes wrong</strong></p> <p>Occasionally even the most diligent organisation might experience a security incident. The whole approach of the GDPR is based on&nbsp;managing&nbsp;risk, not avoiding all risk. The fact that some of our Security Outcomes describe detecting events and minimising the impact should underline this. If you are (or think you are) subject to an incident that involves personal data then you are likely to be obliged to report this to the ICO. They have published&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/personal-data-breaches"><span style="color: #0000ff;">guidance</span></a>&nbsp;on&nbsp;their website to help you understand&nbsp;what you should report, and by when.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color: #0000ff;"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color: #0000ff;">&nbsp;</span></p></div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img style="float: left; height: 267px; margin: 5px; width: 400px;" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/gdpr_ico.jpeg" alt=""><a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/blog-post/countdown-gdpr"><span style="color: #0000ff;"><em>This blog was originally posted on the NCSC website.</em></span></a></p> <p>Anybody who is involved in cyber security or data protection will be acutely aware that the General Data Protection Regulation - better known simply as GDPR - comes into force on Friday, 25&nbsp;May. We have worked very closely with the<a href="https://ico.org.uk/"><span style="color: #0000ff;">&nbsp;Information Commissioners Office&nbsp;(ICO) </span></a>to develop a set of a set of&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/gdpr-security-outcomes"><span style="color: #0000ff;">GDPR Security Outcomes</span></a>, which we published last week.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>GDPR and cyber</strong></p> <p>If you have tried to read and understand the relevant articles described in&nbsp;<a href="https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/law-topic/data-protection/data-protection-eu_en"><span style="color: #0000ff;">the Regulation</span></a>,&nbsp;well done. I personally have found it really hard work to break it apart, summarise what security measures it&nbsp;really&nbsp;seeks, and then overlay good cyber security practice to meet those requirements. Thankfully, the ICO really do understand the detail, and so we have worked together to describe what the regulation requires and provide an overview on what sorts of cyber security measures we expect those organisations processing personal data to have in place. We have published this work as a set of&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/gdpr-security-outcomes"><span style="color: #0000ff;">Security Outcomes required for GDPR</span></a>, together with some relevant overarching&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/GDPR"><span style="color: #0000ff;">GDPR information</span></a>. Whilst we have a shared interest with the ICO on cyber security, of course they are the lead for the GDPR and you should consult their&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/"><span style="color: #0000ff;">website</span></a>&nbsp;for any general GDPR questions or needs that you might have.</p> <p><strong>What GDPR says about cyber</strong></p> <p>Now I'm going to quote parts of the Regulation here&nbsp; - so bear with me - but I will give some context as well.</p> <p>There is an overarching requirement that basically says that you need to protect personal information. It states that personal information must be:</p> <p><em>"processed in a manner that ensures appropriate security of the personal data, including protection against unauthorised or unlawful processing and against accidental loss, destruction or damage, using appropriate technical or organisational measures"</em></p> <p>The key thing to note here is that personal information being correct and available is in scope - not just protecting its confidentiality.</p> <p>One thing that I personally like in the GDPR (OK so it's a little bit nerdy to have a favourite part of data protection legislation)&nbsp;is that it specifically requires&nbsp;organisations&nbsp;to think about security as you design services as well as at the point when processing happens. It means that services must be designed with security in mind&nbsp;<strong>from the outset</strong>,&nbsp;and that you have to keep them secure<strong> through the whole lifecycle</strong>. You can't just develop services and allow security debt (when security corners are cut to meet to meet business delivery) to accumulate.</p> <p>The Regulation refers in a number of places to:</p> <p><em>"appropriate technical and organisational measures"</em></p> <p>It emphasises that you need to take a risk managed approach to security that is influenced by the risk to the individuals whose data you are processing, the state of the art (of technology) and cost. 'Appropriate' really does depend; we understand that<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/blog-post/please-stop-saying-it-depends"><span style="color: #0000ff;">&nbsp;saying 'it depends' can be really frustrating</span></a>&nbsp;and people need a bit more certainty than that. Whilst the GDPR takes this 'it depends' approach, we have worked with the ICO to develop Security Outcomes that we would jointly expect any organisation to meet.</p> <p><strong>What are Security Outcomes?</strong></p> <p>As the name suggest these are outcomes that any organisation should seek to achieve with regards to cyber security. They do not themselves carry mandatory status, although they are our joint approximation of what&nbsp;<strong>appropriate</strong>&nbsp;means under the Regulation.&nbsp;You'll find that the outcomes do not say precisely what to do with regards to cyber security. That's deliberate as it's&nbsp;not&nbsp;for us (neither the NCSC nor the ICO) to tell you what technologies to use, nor to limit your choices in how you chose to protect them. Equally we need the outcomes to work for organisations of many sizes and complexity.&nbsp;Overall this was probably the hardest challenge and we'd like to hear your feedback if there are areas that don't quite work (and the reasons of course).</p> <p>As we wrote the outcomes, we attempted to define the&nbsp;minimal set of measures&nbsp;that represent decent practice with regards to security. We do not believe we have described anything that is unreasonable, or should be surprising to you. Again let us know if you feel this isn't the case. Defining what we believe to be good practice means that existing guidance remains appropriate and can help you design measures that meet the outcomes. There is a lot of existing material&nbsp; - including our own&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/smallbusiness"><span style="color: #0000ff;">Small Business Guide</span></a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/security/"><span style="color: #0000ff;">ICO's guidance on GDPR</span></a>&nbsp;- which you may find helpful.</p> <p>We know that good security isn't just about putting technical mitigations in place. The outcomes are aligned to 4 top level aims which cover how you manage security, protecting personal data from cyber attack, detecting incidents and minimising the impact if an incident does happen.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Existing schemes and certifications</strong></p> <p>I'm asked a lot whether having&nbsp;Cyber Essentials&nbsp;means you are compliant with the GDPR cyber security requirements. Certainly having <a href="https://www.cyberessentials.ncsc.gov.uk/"><span style="color: #0000ff;">Cyber Essentials</span></a> certification is a&nbsp;good thing and it will show that you take protecting yourself from cyber attack seriously. I wholeheartedly recommend it but there are other areas, outside the scope of Cyber Essentials, where you need to protect personal information too. A good example might be protecting data at rest on a laptop. The same logic applies to other certifications you might have; they are part of the picture, but you must still ensure that you are comprehensively protecting personal data.</p> <p><strong>If something goes wrong</strong></p> <p>Occasionally even the most diligent organisation might experience a security incident. The whole approach of the GDPR is based on&nbsp;managing&nbsp;risk, not avoiding all risk. The fact that some of our Security Outcomes describe detecting events and minimising the impact should underline this. If you are (or think you are) subject to an incident that involves personal data then you are likely to be obliged to report this to the ICO. They have published&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/personal-data-breaches"><span style="color: #0000ff;">guidance</span></a>&nbsp;on&nbsp;their website to help you understand&nbsp;what you should report, and by when.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color: #0000ff;"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color: #0000ff;">&nbsp;</span></p></div> techUK & Cogx talk AI ethics 2018-05-23T13:31:32+01:00 2018-05-23T13:31:32+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/13179-techuk-cogx-talk-ai-ethics CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Cog_X_logo_Grey-01.png" style="float:left; height:156px; margin:5px; width:500px">On 11 &ndash; 12 June techUK is proud to be supporting the upcoming <u>Cogx Festival of All things AI</u> event happening taking place at the Tobacco Dock during London Tech Week. CogX 2018 brings together 4,000 attendees and 300 speakers across 5 main stages, more than doubling the size of the acclaimed inaugural 2017 event. On 11 June from 12.00 &ndash; 13.00,&nbsp;techUK&rsquo;s Deputy CEO Antony Walker will be chairing a techUK panel of leading experts discussing the issue of ethics beyond just the introduction of GDPR and how businesses can think and act beyond legal compliance.</p> <p>The current global digital ethics debate comes at a time when businesses are focused on complying&nbsp;with the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Compared to hard regulation, ethics can sound academic and ethereal, disconnected from the practical realities of running and growing a business.&nbsp;But this isn't the case. Ethics is about decision-making. Something that businesses do day-in day-out. Thinking about the ethical implications of innovation in new technology can sound difficult and&nbsp;daunting - a mire to get bogged down in. But when it comes to AI,&nbsp;sound ethical decisions are also likely to be sound business decisions. So how can businesses build ethics into the way they work and think? What kind of tools can help in guiding ethical decision making and what capabilities and capacities do companies need to build across their organisations&nbsp;to identify, consider and address ethical concerns?&nbsp;And does GDPR compliance help or hinder businesses that want to do the right thing?</p> <p>A panel of leading speakers will discuss how ethics can be mainstreamed into businesses focused on pioneering new technologies; the link between regulatory compliance and wider ethical considerations; the role of emerging ethical frameworks being developed by organisations around&nbsp;the world and the potential for simple tools and processes that can help keep businesses on the right track.&nbsp;The panel will also identify examples of best practice and lessons that can be learnt from companies that have already taken an ethical approach to decision making.</p> <p>Speakers will include:</p> <ul><li>Dame Colette Bowe, Chairman of the Nuffield Foundation Advisory Group on Data Ethics</li> <li>Hetan Shah, Executive Director, Royal Statistical Society</li> <li>Rachel Coldicutt, CEO, Doteveryone</li> <li>Francesca Rossi,&nbsp; AI Ethics Global Leader, Distinguished Research Staff Member, IBM</li> </ul><p>techUK has secured a 10% discount for techUK members wanting to attend the Cogx event. To book your tickets head to the <a href="https://goo.gl/Kay5r6"><span style="color:#0000FF">Cogx website </span></a>and use the following code, which expires on the 31st May:<br><br><strong>Code: CogX18TechUK</strong></p> <p>For further information on the techUK panel and the Cogx event itself please contact <a href="mailto:sue.daley@techuk.org"><span style="color:#0000FF">sue.daley@techuk.org</span></a>.</p>{bio}sue.daley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Cog_X_logo_Grey-01.png" style="float:left; height:156px; margin:5px; width:500px">On 11 &ndash; 12 June techUK is proud to be supporting the upcoming <u>Cogx Festival of All things AI</u> event happening taking place at the Tobacco Dock during London Tech Week. CogX 2018 brings together 4,000 attendees and 300 speakers across 5 main stages, more than doubling the size of the acclaimed inaugural 2017 event. On 11 June from 12.00 &ndash; 13.00,&nbsp;techUK&rsquo;s Deputy CEO Antony Walker will be chairing a techUK panel of leading experts discussing the issue of ethics beyond just the introduction of GDPR and how businesses can think and act beyond legal compliance.</p> <p>The current global digital ethics debate comes at a time when businesses are focused on complying&nbsp;with the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Compared to hard regulation, ethics can sound academic and ethereal, disconnected from the practical realities of running and growing a business.&nbsp;But this isn't the case. Ethics is about decision-making. Something that businesses do day-in day-out. Thinking about the ethical implications of innovation in new technology can sound difficult and&nbsp;daunting - a mire to get bogged down in. But when it comes to AI,&nbsp;sound ethical decisions are also likely to be sound business decisions. So how can businesses build ethics into the way they work and think? What kind of tools can help in guiding ethical decision making and what capabilities and capacities do companies need to build across their organisations&nbsp;to identify, consider and address ethical concerns?&nbsp;And does GDPR compliance help or hinder businesses that want to do the right thing?</p> <p>A panel of leading speakers will discuss how ethics can be mainstreamed into businesses focused on pioneering new technologies; the link between regulatory compliance and wider ethical considerations; the role of emerging ethical frameworks being developed by organisations around&nbsp;the world and the potential for simple tools and processes that can help keep businesses on the right track.&nbsp;The panel will also identify examples of best practice and lessons that can be learnt from companies that have already taken an ethical approach to decision making.</p> <p>Speakers will include:</p> <ul><li>Dame Colette Bowe, Chairman of the Nuffield Foundation Advisory Group on Data Ethics</li> <li>Hetan Shah, Executive Director, Royal Statistical Society</li> <li>Rachel Coldicutt, CEO, Doteveryone</li> <li>Francesca Rossi,&nbsp; AI Ethics Global Leader, Distinguished Research Staff Member, IBM</li> </ul><p>techUK has secured a 10% discount for techUK members wanting to attend the Cogx event. To book your tickets head to the <a href="https://goo.gl/Kay5r6"><span style="color:#0000FF">Cogx website </span></a>and use the following code, which expires on the 31st May:<br><br><strong>Code: CogX18TechUK</strong></p> <p>For further information on the techUK panel and the Cogx event itself please contact <a href="mailto:sue.daley@techuk.org"><span style="color:#0000FF">sue.daley@techuk.org</span></a>.</p>{bio}sue.daley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> GDPR goes into effect 2018-05-23T14:15:00+01:00 2018-05-23T14:15:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13177-gdpr-goes-into-effect CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Screen%20Shot%202018-05-23%20at%206.51.55%20AM.png" style="float:right; height:349px; margin:5px; width:300px">With May 25th nearly here, we are ushering in a new era in the world of data protection, with perhaps as much historic significance as the royal wedding. ITI&rsquo;s member companies &ndash; which encompass the entire tech ecosystem - are rolling out innovative new consent and control mechanisms for their users to reaffirm a relationship of trust and mutual benefit and poring over contractual terms to ensure they are transparent and reliable stewards of their customer&rsquo;s personal data.</p> <p>The Global Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) &nbsp;has opened the door for a conversation globally about the way in which we as society use personal data, and it aims to ensure that data protection will not only be a topic of serious conversation at the highest levels within public and private organizations around the world, but that there will be a synonymous shift in culture, with individuals becoming more informed about their rights and responsibilities when it comes to protecting the privacy and security of their own data. Indeed, both of these outcomes are necessary to ensure that this new era driven by data is one that will benefit us all.</p> <p>However, there is a very real risk that uneven or unclear implementation of the GDPR across the EU could have unforeseen consequences. A burdensome compliance process and a shift away from unencumbered flows of data across borders, could diminish efficiencies and make small or large companies doing business in Europe and around the world averse to using personal data in innovative new ways. For the GDPR to be a success story, May 25th needs to be the beginning and not the end, of an iterative conversation between public and private stakeholders globally, including small and large businesses, associations, civil society, data protection authorities, through the next several years. We have already witnessed the power of innovation to improve people&rsquo;s everyday lives.</p> <p>Never before in human history can so much information be accessed so readily and freely for the betterment of society. New innovations such as self-driving cars, artificial intelligence, and the promise of the Internet of Things (IoT) are propelling the world into a new age of breakthrough technology and advancement but are heavily reliant on companies&rsquo; and governments&rsquo; ability to foster trust in them. For society to continue to harness their potential, and for Europe to be a global leader in helping our companies advance these goals, we all need the GDPR to be a success story.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>About ITI</p> <p>ITI is the premier advocate and thought leader around the world for the global information and communications technology (ICT) industry. ITI&rsquo;s members comprise leading technology and innovation companies from all corners of the ICT sector, including hardware, software, digital services, semiconductor, network equipment, cybersecurity, and Internet companies. Privacy and data protection are critical to ITI members. Facilitating the protection of our customers, including governments, businesses, and consumers, and securing and protecting the privacy of individuals&rsquo; data are core drivers for our companies. Consequently, ITI has been a leading voice in advocating effective approaches to privacy around the globe.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Screen%20Shot%202018-05-23%20at%206.51.55%20AM.png" style="float:right; height:349px; margin:5px; width:300px">With May 25th nearly here, we are ushering in a new era in the world of data protection, with perhaps as much historic significance as the royal wedding. ITI&rsquo;s member companies &ndash; which encompass the entire tech ecosystem - are rolling out innovative new consent and control mechanisms for their users to reaffirm a relationship of trust and mutual benefit and poring over contractual terms to ensure they are transparent and reliable stewards of their customer&rsquo;s personal data.</p> <p>The Global Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) &nbsp;has opened the door for a conversation globally about the way in which we as society use personal data, and it aims to ensure that data protection will not only be a topic of serious conversation at the highest levels within public and private organizations around the world, but that there will be a synonymous shift in culture, with individuals becoming more informed about their rights and responsibilities when it comes to protecting the privacy and security of their own data. Indeed, both of these outcomes are necessary to ensure that this new era driven by data is one that will benefit us all.</p> <p>However, there is a very real risk that uneven or unclear implementation of the GDPR across the EU could have unforeseen consequences. A burdensome compliance process and a shift away from unencumbered flows of data across borders, could diminish efficiencies and make small or large companies doing business in Europe and around the world averse to using personal data in innovative new ways. For the GDPR to be a success story, May 25th needs to be the beginning and not the end, of an iterative conversation between public and private stakeholders globally, including small and large businesses, associations, civil society, data protection authorities, through the next several years. We have already witnessed the power of innovation to improve people&rsquo;s everyday lives.</p> <p>Never before in human history can so much information be accessed so readily and freely for the betterment of society. New innovations such as self-driving cars, artificial intelligence, and the promise of the Internet of Things (IoT) are propelling the world into a new age of breakthrough technology and advancement but are heavily reliant on companies&rsquo; and governments&rsquo; ability to foster trust in them. For society to continue to harness their potential, and for Europe to be a global leader in helping our companies advance these goals, we all need the GDPR to be a success story.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>About ITI</p> <p>ITI is the premier advocate and thought leader around the world for the global information and communications technology (ICT) industry. ITI&rsquo;s members comprise leading technology and innovation companies from all corners of the ICT sector, including hardware, software, digital services, semiconductor, network equipment, cybersecurity, and Internet companies. Privacy and data protection are critical to ITI members. Facilitating the protection of our customers, including governments, businesses, and consumers, and securing and protecting the privacy of individuals&rsquo; data are core drivers for our companies. Consequently, ITI has been a leading voice in advocating effective approaches to privacy around the globe.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Programme CORTISONE Procurement Announcement 2018-05-23T11:31:33+01:00 2018-05-23T11:31:33+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/reports/item/13175-programme-cortisone-procurement-announcement CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p style="text-align:center"><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://techuk.zoom.us/recording/play/XvJl1RMaNd2H4p7NxacqNnzNkg1YjfoHe7UeGXaNi0UxOFyU18Kbu4wYXEFOZu37" width="560"></iframe></p> <p>Above is the video recording of the Programme CORTISONE Procurement Announcement from the 17 May 2018.</p> <p>Message from ISS Programme CORTISONE team:</p> <p><strong><em>&ldquo;Dear Suppliers,</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Thanks for attending our Procurement Announcement Event. Attached is our High Level Design, on which we&rsquo;d like feedback by 5pm 5th June. Whilst we are interested in all feedback, we are particularly interested in answers to the following questions:</em></strong></p> <ol start="1"><li><strong><em>Is the target architecture achievable?</em></strong></li> <li><strong><em>Is the capability bundling realisable?</em></strong></li> <li><strong><em>Based on the information provided is there anything that would prevent you from bidding?</em></strong></li> </ol><p><strong><em>All responses should be sent to the ISS team <a href="http://mark.brownlee655@mod.gov.uk">here</a>.</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Also if you have any further comments on the procurement announcement event itself, a digital version of the feedback form on the day <a href="https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=7WB3vlNZS0iuldChbfoJ5ZxIDKmatxhFl04AD_IRL0lURVlZWks1SDlCQlBNNVhDMEZEQUMyVFpCRS4u"><u>can be found here</u></a>. Feedback will be used to inform the structure/content of future events.</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Yours Sincerely,</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Mark Brownlee</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>CORTISONE Commercial Lead&rdquo;</em></strong></p> <p>Slides from the day as well as the High Level Design are attached below.</p> <p>If you have any queries, please contact Dan Patefield or Charlie Wyatt.</p>{bio}Charlie.Wyatt@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}dan.patefield@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p style="text-align:center"><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://techuk.zoom.us/recording/play/XvJl1RMaNd2H4p7NxacqNnzNkg1YjfoHe7UeGXaNi0UxOFyU18Kbu4wYXEFOZu37" width="560"></iframe></p> <p>Above is the video recording of the Programme CORTISONE Procurement Announcement from the 17 May 2018.</p> <p>Message from ISS Programme CORTISONE team:</p> <p><strong><em>&ldquo;Dear Suppliers,</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Thanks for attending our Procurement Announcement Event. Attached is our High Level Design, on which we&rsquo;d like feedback by 5pm 5th June. Whilst we are interested in all feedback, we are particularly interested in answers to the following questions:</em></strong></p> <ol start="1"><li><strong><em>Is the target architecture achievable?</em></strong></li> <li><strong><em>Is the capability bundling realisable?</em></strong></li> <li><strong><em>Based on the information provided is there anything that would prevent you from bidding?</em></strong></li> </ol><p><strong><em>All responses should be sent to the ISS team <a href="http://mark.brownlee655@mod.gov.uk">here</a>.</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Also if you have any further comments on the procurement announcement event itself, a digital version of the feedback form on the day <a href="https://forms.office.com/Pages/ResponsePage.aspx?id=7WB3vlNZS0iuldChbfoJ5ZxIDKmatxhFl04AD_IRL0lURVlZWks1SDlCQlBNNVhDMEZEQUMyVFpCRS4u"><u>can be found here</u></a>. Feedback will be used to inform the structure/content of future events.</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Yours Sincerely,</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Mark Brownlee</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>CORTISONE Commercial Lead&rdquo;</em></strong></p> <p>Slides from the day as well as the High Level Design are attached below.</p> <p>If you have any queries, please contact Dan Patefield or Charlie Wyatt.</p>{bio}Charlie.Wyatt@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}dan.patefield@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Protecting data shouldn’t mean blocking trade 2018-05-23T10:57:04+01:00 2018-05-23T10:57:04+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13174-protecting-data-shouldn-t-mean-blocking-trade CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Cecilia%20Digital%20Europe.jpg" style="float:left; height:267px; margin:5px; width:400px">There is no trade without data: no matter what sector a company operates in, with the ability to move one&rsquo;s products or services across borders comes the necessity to move the related data. This is the&nbsp;basic&nbsp;form of digitisation all&nbsp;industries have&nbsp;already&nbsp;gone through,&nbsp;will be&nbsp;even more&nbsp;critical for&nbsp;the full&nbsp;digital transformation&nbsp;of our societies&nbsp;and&nbsp;is&nbsp;rightly&nbsp;prominent&nbsp;in discussions about relations between the EU and the UK&nbsp;after 1 January 2021.&nbsp;</p> <p>But of course, data is more than&nbsp;just&nbsp;trade.&nbsp;In Europe,&nbsp;we&nbsp;regard the protection of people&rsquo;s information as a fundamental right; this has created a complex legal system&nbsp;designed&nbsp;to protect personal data, including&nbsp;very strict rules about moving Europeans&rsquo; data outside the EU.&nbsp;</p> <p>At the same time,&nbsp;the EU has always sought to provide solutions to enable the free flow of data&nbsp;that&rsquo;s&nbsp;needed&nbsp;to power&nbsp;Europe&rsquo;s&nbsp;vast&nbsp;web of international trade relationships.&nbsp;Europe&rsquo;s key trade partners&nbsp;such as the US and Japan either have or are in the process of receiving&nbsp;forms of adequacy that allow the uninterrupted&nbsp;provision&nbsp;of goods&nbsp;and services between these countries&nbsp;and Europe. As DIGITALEUROPE, we are actively engaged to ensure the continued availability of these adequacy decisions, as well as other mechanisms such as model clauses, which enable commercial flows under appropriate safeguards.&nbsp;</p> <p>Similarly, businesses on both sides of the Channel will want to ensure the UK benefits from a strong data adequacy regime, building on the fact that UK law already incorporates&nbsp;the EU&rsquo;s data protection&nbsp;acquis.&nbsp;This is a priority&nbsp;for&nbsp;all&nbsp;DIGITALEUROPE members.&nbsp;</p> <p>Ensuring&nbsp;adequacy for the&nbsp;UK is part of&nbsp;a broader&nbsp;need&nbsp;to put in place&nbsp;balanced, workable and enforceable mechanisms&nbsp;for cross-border data flows, including both&nbsp;personal data and mixed data sets.&nbsp;Unjustifiable&nbsp;limitations&nbsp;to&nbsp;cross-border&nbsp;data flows and forced localisation measures&nbsp;present&nbsp;significant&nbsp;barriers&nbsp;not only for&nbsp;Europe&rsquo;s&nbsp;trade with third countries but also for European companies&nbsp;wanting&nbsp;to&nbsp;scale their EU operations,&nbsp;including in the&nbsp;growing area&nbsp;of digital manufacturing that is key to&nbsp;many&nbsp;EU Member State economies.&nbsp;</p> <p>Data localisation, both within Europe and&nbsp;around the world,&nbsp;is often disguised by reasons of public security, public policy objectives&nbsp;or activities&nbsp;performed by&nbsp;public authorities.&nbsp;The temptation to add more&nbsp;generic&nbsp;exceptions to the principle of free flow is always there.&nbsp;But&nbsp;localisation that results from a purported need to safeguard privacy or data protection&nbsp;is equally damaging, because this exception could&nbsp;easily&nbsp;be used in an arbitrary&nbsp;way and&nbsp;lead&nbsp;to&nbsp;an&nbsp;open-ended&nbsp;right&nbsp;to&nbsp;impose unwarranted&nbsp;data protectionism.&nbsp;</p> <p>When it comes to&nbsp;cross-border data flows, the&nbsp;preservation&nbsp;of&nbsp;Europe&rsquo;s data protection system needs to&nbsp;stay&nbsp;aligned&nbsp;with&nbsp;well-established&nbsp;trade law principles&nbsp;for&nbsp;legitimate trade&nbsp;restrictions such as&nbsp;proportionality,&nbsp;non-discrimination and&nbsp;necessity.&nbsp;</p> <p>Let&rsquo;s not restrict our countries&rsquo; ability to prosper from the innovation and growth that strong&nbsp;trade relations bring about. Let&rsquo;s not give up the opportunity to change our economies and societies for the better thanks to data &ndash; Europe&rsquo;s privacy framework is solid and it doesn&rsquo;t need to stop data flows to be enforceable.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Cecilia%20Digital%20Europe.jpg" style="float:left; height:267px; margin:5px; width:400px">There is no trade without data: no matter what sector a company operates in, with the ability to move one&rsquo;s products or services across borders comes the necessity to move the related data. This is the&nbsp;basic&nbsp;form of digitisation all&nbsp;industries have&nbsp;already&nbsp;gone through,&nbsp;will be&nbsp;even more&nbsp;critical for&nbsp;the full&nbsp;digital transformation&nbsp;of our societies&nbsp;and&nbsp;is&nbsp;rightly&nbsp;prominent&nbsp;in discussions about relations between the EU and the UK&nbsp;after 1 January 2021.&nbsp;</p> <p>But of course, data is more than&nbsp;just&nbsp;trade.&nbsp;In Europe,&nbsp;we&nbsp;regard the protection of people&rsquo;s information as a fundamental right; this has created a complex legal system&nbsp;designed&nbsp;to protect personal data, including&nbsp;very strict rules about moving Europeans&rsquo; data outside the EU.&nbsp;</p> <p>At the same time,&nbsp;the EU has always sought to provide solutions to enable the free flow of data&nbsp;that&rsquo;s&nbsp;needed&nbsp;to power&nbsp;Europe&rsquo;s&nbsp;vast&nbsp;web of international trade relationships.&nbsp;Europe&rsquo;s key trade partners&nbsp;such as the US and Japan either have or are in the process of receiving&nbsp;forms of adequacy that allow the uninterrupted&nbsp;provision&nbsp;of goods&nbsp;and services between these countries&nbsp;and Europe. As DIGITALEUROPE, we are actively engaged to ensure the continued availability of these adequacy decisions, as well as other mechanisms such as model clauses, which enable commercial flows under appropriate safeguards.&nbsp;</p> <p>Similarly, businesses on both sides of the Channel will want to ensure the UK benefits from a strong data adequacy regime, building on the fact that UK law already incorporates&nbsp;the EU&rsquo;s data protection&nbsp;acquis.&nbsp;This is a priority&nbsp;for&nbsp;all&nbsp;DIGITALEUROPE members.&nbsp;</p> <p>Ensuring&nbsp;adequacy for the&nbsp;UK is part of&nbsp;a broader&nbsp;need&nbsp;to put in place&nbsp;balanced, workable and enforceable mechanisms&nbsp;for cross-border data flows, including both&nbsp;personal data and mixed data sets.&nbsp;Unjustifiable&nbsp;limitations&nbsp;to&nbsp;cross-border&nbsp;data flows and forced localisation measures&nbsp;present&nbsp;significant&nbsp;barriers&nbsp;not only for&nbsp;Europe&rsquo;s&nbsp;trade with third countries but also for European companies&nbsp;wanting&nbsp;to&nbsp;scale their EU operations,&nbsp;including in the&nbsp;growing area&nbsp;of digital manufacturing that is key to&nbsp;many&nbsp;EU Member State economies.&nbsp;</p> <p>Data localisation, both within Europe and&nbsp;around the world,&nbsp;is often disguised by reasons of public security, public policy objectives&nbsp;or activities&nbsp;performed by&nbsp;public authorities.&nbsp;The temptation to add more&nbsp;generic&nbsp;exceptions to the principle of free flow is always there.&nbsp;But&nbsp;localisation that results from a purported need to safeguard privacy or data protection&nbsp;is equally damaging, because this exception could&nbsp;easily&nbsp;be used in an arbitrary&nbsp;way and&nbsp;lead&nbsp;to&nbsp;an&nbsp;open-ended&nbsp;right&nbsp;to&nbsp;impose unwarranted&nbsp;data protectionism.&nbsp;</p> <p>When it comes to&nbsp;cross-border data flows, the&nbsp;preservation&nbsp;of&nbsp;Europe&rsquo;s data protection system needs to&nbsp;stay&nbsp;aligned&nbsp;with&nbsp;well-established&nbsp;trade law principles&nbsp;for&nbsp;legitimate trade&nbsp;restrictions such as&nbsp;proportionality,&nbsp;non-discrimination and&nbsp;necessity.&nbsp;</p> <p>Let&rsquo;s not restrict our countries&rsquo; ability to prosper from the innovation and growth that strong&nbsp;trade relations bring about. Let&rsquo;s not give up the opportunity to change our economies and societies for the better thanks to data &ndash; Europe&rsquo;s privacy framework is solid and it doesn&rsquo;t need to stop data flows to be enforceable.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> techUK comment on Algorithms in Decision-Making report 2018-05-23T09:51:56+01:00 2018-05-23T09:51:56+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/13171-techuk-comment-on-algorithms-in-decision-making-report CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><strong>Commenting on the report released by the House of Commons Science and Technology Select Committee Report entitled Algorithms in&nbsp;Decision-Making, Sue Daley, Head of Cloud, Data and AI, techUK said:</strong></p> <p><em>"This report comes at a time when the UK has the opportunity to be a global leader not just in the development of AI but also in the governance and ethics of its use.</em></p> <p><em>&ldquo;The report highlights the huge social and economic benefits that can come from AI. But it also recognises the challenges around data bias, transparency and accountability that must be addressed. We agree that the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation has a vital role to play in deepening understanding and developing policy on these issues. Time is of the essence and we want to see the Centre up and running as soon as possible.&rdquo;</em></p> <p><em>&ldquo;The Committee's focus on the importance of data governance is clearly right. With GDPR about to enter into force, techUK has called for additional resources for the Information Commissioners Office (ICO). The UK is fortunate to have a highly respected data protection regulator &ndash; as data plays an ever more important role in our economy, it is vital that the ICO has the resources it needs to operate effectively and at speed and support the important work of the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation."</em></p>{bio}sue.daley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><strong>Commenting on the report released by the House of Commons Science and Technology Select Committee Report entitled Algorithms in&nbsp;Decision-Making, Sue Daley, Head of Cloud, Data and AI, techUK said:</strong></p> <p><em>"This report comes at a time when the UK has the opportunity to be a global leader not just in the development of AI but also in the governance and ethics of its use.</em></p> <p><em>&ldquo;The report highlights the huge social and economic benefits that can come from AI. But it also recognises the challenges around data bias, transparency and accountability that must be addressed. We agree that the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation has a vital role to play in deepening understanding and developing policy on these issues. Time is of the essence and we want to see the Centre up and running as soon as possible.&rdquo;</em></p> <p><em>&ldquo;The Committee's focus on the importance of data governance is clearly right. With GDPR about to enter into force, techUK has called for additional resources for the Information Commissioners Office (ICO). The UK is fortunate to have a highly respected data protection regulator &ndash; as data plays an ever more important role in our economy, it is vital that the ICO has the resources it needs to operate effectively and at speed and support the important work of the Centre for Data Ethics and Innovation."</em></p>{bio}sue.daley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Briefing Note on Heat Network Regulation for Data Centres 2018-05-23T08:00:00+01:00 2018-05-23T08:00:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/13170-briefing-note-on-heat-network-regulation-for-data-centres CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Please click below to download the document.</p>{bio}emma.fryer@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Please click below to download the document.</p>{bio}emma.fryer@techuk.org{/bio}</div> techUK International Trade Newsletter | UK India Tech Alliance 2018-05-23T09:43:00+01:00 2018-05-23T09:43:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/newsletters/item/13167-techuk-international-trade-newsletter-uk-india-tech-alliance CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>March and April have been very busy, with a number of key activities happening in the run up to the Commonwealth Heads of Government (CHOGM) meeting. Ahead of CHOGM, India&rsquo;s Prime Minister Narendra Modi met with Prime Minister May and launched the <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/DEDD607E/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">UK-India Tech Partnership</span></a>, placing tech at the heart of the burgeoning relationship between the two countries.<br><br> As part of the Partnership, techUK and the National Association of Software &amp; Services Companies (NASSCOM) launched the <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/B0734D67/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">UK-India Tech Alliance</span></a> and agreed on a Memorandum of Understanding to support the flourishing IT sectors in both India and the UK by developing stronger links, networks and joint platforms, to help enhance the skills of the technology workforce in both countries.&nbsp;<a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/DECAC8/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">You can read more about the Alliance here.</span></a><br><br> The Partnership also announced a UK-India Tech Hub to identify and pair businesses, venture capital, universities and others to access routes to markets for British and Indian tech companies.<br><br> In addition to the UK India Tech Alliance, techUK is proud to be the UK tech partner for the <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/CE06518F/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Access India Programme (AIP)</span></a>,&nbsp;launched in September 2017 by the High Commission of India in London. This flagship programme, assisting market entry into India, is the first of its kind for supporting UK businesses to access the Indian&nbsp;Government's Make in India initiative. The programme focuses on providing support to small and medium size UK enterprise.<br><br> Moving forward, our GoToMarket series continues to grow with an <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/2D0D61A0/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">AI/ML International Expansion Workshop</span></a> on 23 May offering free one-to-one two-hour mentoring workshop sessions with international expansion experts.<br><br> As part of <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/28C1759B/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">London Tech Week,</span></a> 11 &ndash; 17 June, we are running a number of events, including a seminar on&nbsp;<a href="https://portal.techuk.org/my-events/event/?id=d3e42efa-233f-e811-8122-5065f38a8ad1&amp;_cldee=c2ltb24uc3BpZXJAdGVjaHVrLm9yZw%3d%3d&amp;recipientid=contact-73b450111523e81181145065f38b4641-88090bd42b7b4e07a30a4f13b2c00bd6&amp;esid=b9fe38dd-6853-e811-811f-5065f38b4641&amp;urlid=10"><span style="color:#0000FF">Selling in to the UK Public Sector</span></a>. Please note to book this event you will need to register / login to techUK's new portal.<br><br> Finally, techUK is seeking member input on trade policy issues that affect your business, from tariffs and intellectual property rights, to investment protection and national treatment and anything in between. We are particularly keen to hear from businesses trading with non-EU countries. If you would like to discuss, get in touch with our Policy Manager for Brexit and Trade, <a href="mailto:thomas.goldsmith@techuk.org"><span style="color:#0000FF">Thomas Goldsmith</span></a>.<br><br> Information on all of these activities and more can be found below.<br><br> All the best<br> Simon<br> Simon Spier | Head of International Trade<br> E <a href="mailto:simon.spier@techuk.org"><span style="color:#0000FF">simon.spier@techuk.org</span></a> | T (0) 20 7331 2008</p> <hr><h3>Updates</h3> <p><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/FAD53040/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">UK-India tech partnership signals next steps in thriving relationship</span></a><br> UK and Indian Governments launched the UK-India Tech Partnership, which will include a UK-India Tech Hub.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/BAF1D518/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">techUK members awarded Queen&rsquo;s Awards for Enterprise</span></a><br> Several techUK members were honours in various fields, including International Trade, at the Queen&rsquo;s Awards for Enterprise in what is Her Majesty&rsquo;s 90th birthday year.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/E49FF831/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">techUK at London Tech Week</span></a><br> techUK is proud to be an official strategic partner of London Tech Week 2018, with over 300 events showcasing the best of tech and driving change across London.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/83D285B6/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Tech at CHOGM</span></a><br> London hosted the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting, which contained plenty of announcements and initiatives relating to tech.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/FE617016/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Tech opens new era of opportunity for India and the UK</span></a><br> Simon Spier, techUK Head of International Trade, looks at techUK&rsquo;s engagement with the Commonwealth&rsquo;s most populous country, India.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/BF7868D7/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Brexit and Customs, Sanctions and Export Controls: Event Report</span></a><br> techUK held an event with Dechert and ADS on the impact of Brexit on export controls, sanctions and customs &ndash; here we outline the main points.</p> <hr><h3>Opportunities and Events</h3> <p><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/F99B3AD2/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">techUK Introductory Evening</span></a><br> Come along to hear more about&nbsp;techUK, how we work and how you can access our many member benefits and services.<br> 14 May, techUK, London<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/DC689674/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">AI / ML International Expansion Workshop</span></a><br> Are you a business selling products and services that utilise Artificial Intelligence /Machine Learning and looking to expand internationally in 2018? Register for a free one-to-one two-hour mentoring workshop session with international expansion experts.<br> 23 May, Silicon Valley Bank, London<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/59C915C9/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">The World Forum for Foreign Direct Investment&nbsp;</span></a><br> The 2018 World Forum for FDI brings together expanding companies, investment promotion agencies and service providers to explore the latest in solutions, innovation, and best practices. For 15 years the World Forum for FDI has been providing inspiration straight from the most successful leaders and visionaries in the industry, giving attendees the opportunity to receive practical training from FDI experts, and bringing together expanding companies, IPA&rsquo;s and service providers from across the globe to network and forge long&ndash;lasting relationships. Business leaders, chief executives and decision-makers come to hear and discuss the latest news and trends on corporate investment strategy and expansion opportunities.<br> 11 - 13 June, Liverpool&#8203;&#8203;&#8203;&#8203;&#8203;&#8203;&#8203;<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/E182BF3/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">London Tech Week - Selling into the Public Sector</span></a><br> Join us for a seminar to learn how to navigate the UK Government&rsquo;s technology procurement processes. This event is part of London Tech Week and will provide the opportunity to understand how UK Government procurement works, what are the opportunities, how to overcome the challenges, and tips on how to secure business. To book this event you will need to register / login to techUK's new portal - <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/E4807F/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">learn more and download the guide here.</span></a><br> 12 June, techUK, London<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/A2F88C48/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">ConnecTechAsia</span></a><br> The stellar event recognised by industry professionals continues to strengthen and stay relevant to the ever changing info-communications technology industry. &pound;2,500 of TAP funding is available. For further information, contact&nbsp;<a href="mailto:techuk@tradefair.co.uk"><span style="color:#0000FF">techuk@tradefair.co.uk</span></a> or 01622 754200.<br> 26 &ndash; 29 June, Singapore<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/B5F1635C/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Tech in Government &ndash; DIT delegation to Australia</span></a><br> Combining a high-level conference with a large-scale exhibition, Technology in Government brings together senior Public Sector Technologists and Communications Experts to learn, network and source ICT solutions for the ongoing transformation within Government.<br> 7 &ndash; 8 August, Canberra, Australia<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/CCE1C207/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">DIT Ministerial Visits</span></a><br> The Department for International Trade (DIT) is taking an innovative new approach by publishing a list of the countries the International Trade Secretary and his Ministers will be visiting in the coming weeks, to give businesses the opportunity to have their say on &lsquo;in market&rsquo; issues.<br> May and June<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/7C1DF310/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">techUK&nbsp;2018 Annual Dinner</span></a><br> This evening brings together senior representatives across the UK tech industry, government and civil service to network and to hear positive, thought-provoking speeches. <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/11577F85/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Be sure to get your tickets here!</span></a><br> 11 July, Royal Lancaster, London<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/BF06FECD/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Apply for a Queens's Award for Enterprise 2019</span></a><br> The Queen&rsquo;s Awards for Enterprise are for outstanding achievement by UK businesses in the categories of:</p> <ul><li>innovation</li> <li>international trade</li> <li>sustainable development</li> <li>promoting opportunity through social mobility</li> </ul><p>Apply at the link above.<br> Deadline: 12 September 2018<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/EA91C86F/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Ongoing TAP support to exhibit at international shows</span></a><br> techUK together with the Department for International Trade and Tradefair are pleased to support the Tradeshow Access Programme (TAP). TAP allows companies exhibiting at certain international exhibitions grants of up to &pound;2500 towards the costs of a show.<br> Ongoing in 2018<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/24875C6/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Access India Programme</span></a><br> techUK is proud to be the UK tech partner for the Access India Programme. The Access India Programme, launched by the High Commission of India in London, is a flagship programme assisting market entry into India. The programme is the first of its kind for supporting UK businesses access the Make in India initiative of the Government of India. The programme solely focuses on providing support to small and medium size UK enterprise.<br> Ongoing in 2018<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/313A5DC6/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Full programme of International Trade events and opportunities</span></a><br> Learn about the full programme of techUK's events and opportunities, including chances to participate in DIT supported pavilions at international exhibitions.<br> Ongoing in 2018</p>{bio}Simon.Spier@techUK.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>March and April have been very busy, with a number of key activities happening in the run up to the Commonwealth Heads of Government (CHOGM) meeting. Ahead of CHOGM, India&rsquo;s Prime Minister Narendra Modi met with Prime Minister May and launched the <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/DEDD607E/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">UK-India Tech Partnership</span></a>, placing tech at the heart of the burgeoning relationship between the two countries.<br><br> As part of the Partnership, techUK and the National Association of Software &amp; Services Companies (NASSCOM) launched the <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/B0734D67/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">UK-India Tech Alliance</span></a> and agreed on a Memorandum of Understanding to support the flourishing IT sectors in both India and the UK by developing stronger links, networks and joint platforms, to help enhance the skills of the technology workforce in both countries.&nbsp;<a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/DECAC8/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">You can read more about the Alliance here.</span></a><br><br> The Partnership also announced a UK-India Tech Hub to identify and pair businesses, venture capital, universities and others to access routes to markets for British and Indian tech companies.<br><br> In addition to the UK India Tech Alliance, techUK is proud to be the UK tech partner for the <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/CE06518F/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Access India Programme (AIP)</span></a>,&nbsp;launched in September 2017 by the High Commission of India in London. This flagship programme, assisting market entry into India, is the first of its kind for supporting UK businesses to access the Indian&nbsp;Government's Make in India initiative. The programme focuses on providing support to small and medium size UK enterprise.<br><br> Moving forward, our GoToMarket series continues to grow with an <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/2D0D61A0/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">AI/ML International Expansion Workshop</span></a> on 23 May offering free one-to-one two-hour mentoring workshop sessions with international expansion experts.<br><br> As part of <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/28C1759B/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">London Tech Week,</span></a> 11 &ndash; 17 June, we are running a number of events, including a seminar on&nbsp;<a href="https://portal.techuk.org/my-events/event/?id=d3e42efa-233f-e811-8122-5065f38a8ad1&amp;_cldee=c2ltb24uc3BpZXJAdGVjaHVrLm9yZw%3d%3d&amp;recipientid=contact-73b450111523e81181145065f38b4641-88090bd42b7b4e07a30a4f13b2c00bd6&amp;esid=b9fe38dd-6853-e811-811f-5065f38b4641&amp;urlid=10"><span style="color:#0000FF">Selling in to the UK Public Sector</span></a>. Please note to book this event you will need to register / login to techUK's new portal.<br><br> Finally, techUK is seeking member input on trade policy issues that affect your business, from tariffs and intellectual property rights, to investment protection and national treatment and anything in between. We are particularly keen to hear from businesses trading with non-EU countries. If you would like to discuss, get in touch with our Policy Manager for Brexit and Trade, <a href="mailto:thomas.goldsmith@techuk.org"><span style="color:#0000FF">Thomas Goldsmith</span></a>.<br><br> Information on all of these activities and more can be found below.<br><br> All the best<br> Simon<br> Simon Spier | Head of International Trade<br> E <a href="mailto:simon.spier@techuk.org"><span style="color:#0000FF">simon.spier@techuk.org</span></a> | T (0) 20 7331 2008</p> <hr><h3>Updates</h3> <p><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/FAD53040/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">UK-India tech partnership signals next steps in thriving relationship</span></a><br> UK and Indian Governments launched the UK-India Tech Partnership, which will include a UK-India Tech Hub.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/BAF1D518/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">techUK members awarded Queen&rsquo;s Awards for Enterprise</span></a><br> Several techUK members were honours in various fields, including International Trade, at the Queen&rsquo;s Awards for Enterprise in what is Her Majesty&rsquo;s 90th birthday year.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/E49FF831/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">techUK at London Tech Week</span></a><br> techUK is proud to be an official strategic partner of London Tech Week 2018, with over 300 events showcasing the best of tech and driving change across London.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/83D285B6/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Tech at CHOGM</span></a><br> London hosted the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting, which contained plenty of announcements and initiatives relating to tech.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/FE617016/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Tech opens new era of opportunity for India and the UK</span></a><br> Simon Spier, techUK Head of International Trade, looks at techUK&rsquo;s engagement with the Commonwealth&rsquo;s most populous country, India.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/BF7868D7/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Brexit and Customs, Sanctions and Export Controls: Event Report</span></a><br> techUK held an event with Dechert and ADS on the impact of Brexit on export controls, sanctions and customs &ndash; here we outline the main points.</p> <hr><h3>Opportunities and Events</h3> <p><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/F99B3AD2/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">techUK Introductory Evening</span></a><br> Come along to hear more about&nbsp;techUK, how we work and how you can access our many member benefits and services.<br> 14 May, techUK, London<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/DC689674/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">AI / ML International Expansion Workshop</span></a><br> Are you a business selling products and services that utilise Artificial Intelligence /Machine Learning and looking to expand internationally in 2018? Register for a free one-to-one two-hour mentoring workshop session with international expansion experts.<br> 23 May, Silicon Valley Bank, London<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/59C915C9/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">The World Forum for Foreign Direct Investment&nbsp;</span></a><br> The 2018 World Forum for FDI brings together expanding companies, investment promotion agencies and service providers to explore the latest in solutions, innovation, and best practices. For 15 years the World Forum for FDI has been providing inspiration straight from the most successful leaders and visionaries in the industry, giving attendees the opportunity to receive practical training from FDI experts, and bringing together expanding companies, IPA&rsquo;s and service providers from across the globe to network and forge long&ndash;lasting relationships. Business leaders, chief executives and decision-makers come to hear and discuss the latest news and trends on corporate investment strategy and expansion opportunities.<br> 11 - 13 June, Liverpool&#8203;&#8203;&#8203;&#8203;&#8203;&#8203;&#8203;<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/E182BF3/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">London Tech Week - Selling into the Public Sector</span></a><br> Join us for a seminar to learn how to navigate the UK Government&rsquo;s technology procurement processes. This event is part of London Tech Week and will provide the opportunity to understand how UK Government procurement works, what are the opportunities, how to overcome the challenges, and tips on how to secure business. To book this event you will need to register / login to techUK's new portal - <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/E4807F/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">learn more and download the guide here.</span></a><br> 12 June, techUK, London<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/A2F88C48/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">ConnecTechAsia</span></a><br> The stellar event recognised by industry professionals continues to strengthen and stay relevant to the ever changing info-communications technology industry. &pound;2,500 of TAP funding is available. For further information, contact&nbsp;<a href="mailto:techuk@tradefair.co.uk"><span style="color:#0000FF">techuk@tradefair.co.uk</span></a> or 01622 754200.<br> 26 &ndash; 29 June, Singapore<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/B5F1635C/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Tech in Government &ndash; DIT delegation to Australia</span></a><br> Combining a high-level conference with a large-scale exhibition, Technology in Government brings together senior Public Sector Technologists and Communications Experts to learn, network and source ICT solutions for the ongoing transformation within Government.<br> 7 &ndash; 8 August, Canberra, Australia<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/CCE1C207/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">DIT Ministerial Visits</span></a><br> The Department for International Trade (DIT) is taking an innovative new approach by publishing a list of the countries the International Trade Secretary and his Ministers will be visiting in the coming weeks, to give businesses the opportunity to have their say on &lsquo;in market&rsquo; issues.<br> May and June<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/7C1DF310/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">techUK&nbsp;2018 Annual Dinner</span></a><br> This evening brings together senior representatives across the UK tech industry, government and civil service to network and to hear positive, thought-provoking speeches. <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/11577F85/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Be sure to get your tickets here!</span></a><br> 11 July, Royal Lancaster, London<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/BF06FECD/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Apply for a Queens's Award for Enterprise 2019</span></a><br> The Queen&rsquo;s Awards for Enterprise are for outstanding achievement by UK businesses in the categories of:</p> <ul><li>innovation</li> <li>international trade</li> <li>sustainable development</li> <li>promoting opportunity through social mobility</li> </ul><p>Apply at the link above.<br> Deadline: 12 September 2018<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/EA91C86F/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Ongoing TAP support to exhibit at international shows</span></a><br> techUK together with the Department for International Trade and Tradefair are pleased to support the Tradeshow Access Programme (TAP). TAP allows companies exhibiting at certain international exhibitions grants of up to &pound;2500 towards the costs of a show.<br> Ongoing in 2018<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/24875C6/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Access India Programme</span></a><br> techUK is proud to be the UK tech partner for the Access India Programme. The Access India Programme, launched by the High Commission of India in London, is a flagship programme assisting market entry into India. The programme is the first of its kind for supporting UK businesses access the Make in India initiative of the Government of India. The programme solely focuses on providing support to small and medium size UK enterprise.<br> Ongoing in 2018<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/cc6d546153ca4fcd8e425c033d480866/F9353811/313A5DC6/052018n"><span style="color:#0000FF">Full programme of International Trade events and opportunities</span></a><br> Learn about the full programme of techUK's events and opportunities, including chances to participate in DIT supported pavilions at international exhibitions.<br> Ongoing in 2018</p>{bio}Simon.Spier@techUK.org{/bio}</div> techUK draft response to BEIS Smart Appliance Consultation 2018-05-22T14:49:31+01:00 2018-05-22T14:49:31+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/reports/item/13166-techuk-draft-response-to-beis-smart-appliance-consultation CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>techUK are submitting a response to the <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/proposals-regarding-setting-standards-for-smart-appliances">BEIS 'Proposals regarding smart appliance' consultation</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>BEIS are&nbsp;<a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/proposals-regarding-setting-standards-for-smart-appliances" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">currently consulting on proposals to set standards for smart appliances</a>&nbsp;to support the transition towards a smarter energy system through facilitating the adoption of consumer demand side response. The objective for setting standards (defined as principles, and associated functionalities which could be based technical standards) is to:</p> <ol><li>Provide certainty in the burgeoning smart appliance sector to support investment to develop smart appliances for the market, enabling electricity system benefits and consumer rewards;</li> <li>Ensure minimum standards of function of smart appliances to protect consumers and the system; and</li> <li>Enable the UK to be at the forefront of an emerging sector.</li> </ol><p>BEIS proposes to take primary powers, subject to Parliamentary time and approval, to mandate these standards for certain smart appliances:</p> <ul><li>Those which are communications enabled and able to modulate their electricity consumption in response to signals; and</li> <li>Those which offer the greatest opportunity for DSR (as outlined above: cold and wet appliances, heating, ventilation, air conditioning and battery storage).</li> </ul><p>The consultations outlines the key principles as interoperability, grid stability &amp; cyber security, and data privacy.</p> <p>Our response is broadly supportive of the 'Option D' preference for developing voluntary standards now whilst reserving the right to mandate standards later.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>We welcome members input into both the high-level proposals and specific actions outlined in the consultation</strong>, with tracked comments particularly appreciated. In order to allow us to collate, address comments and address any differences <strong>we ask for input no later than midday on 4 June.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Please send responses directly to <a href="mailto:matthew.evans@techuk.org?subject=techUK%20BEIS%20Smart%20Appliance%20Consultation">Matthew Evans</a>.</p>{bio}Matthew.Evans@techUK.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>techUK are submitting a response to the <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/proposals-regarding-setting-standards-for-smart-appliances">BEIS 'Proposals regarding smart appliance' consultation</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>BEIS are&nbsp;<a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/proposals-regarding-setting-standards-for-smart-appliances" rel="noopener noreferrer" target="_blank">currently consulting on proposals to set standards for smart appliances</a>&nbsp;to support the transition towards a smarter energy system through facilitating the adoption of consumer demand side response. The objective for setting standards (defined as principles, and associated functionalities which could be based technical standards) is to:</p> <ol><li>Provide certainty in the burgeoning smart appliance sector to support investment to develop smart appliances for the market, enabling electricity system benefits and consumer rewards;</li> <li>Ensure minimum standards of function of smart appliances to protect consumers and the system; and</li> <li>Enable the UK to be at the forefront of an emerging sector.</li> </ol><p>BEIS proposes to take primary powers, subject to Parliamentary time and approval, to mandate these standards for certain smart appliances:</p> <ul><li>Those which are communications enabled and able to modulate their electricity consumption in response to signals; and</li> <li>Those which offer the greatest opportunity for DSR (as outlined above: cold and wet appliances, heating, ventilation, air conditioning and battery storage).</li> </ul><p>The consultations outlines the key principles as interoperability, grid stability &amp; cyber security, and data privacy.</p> <p>Our response is broadly supportive of the 'Option D' preference for developing voluntary standards now whilst reserving the right to mandate standards later.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>We welcome members input into both the high-level proposals and specific actions outlined in the consultation</strong>, with tracked comments particularly appreciated. In order to allow us to collate, address comments and address any differences <strong>we ask for input no later than midday on 4 June.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Please send responses directly to <a href="mailto:matthew.evans@techuk.org?subject=techUK%20BEIS%20Smart%20Appliance%20Consultation">Matthew Evans</a>.</p>{bio}Matthew.Evans@techUK.org{/bio}</div> Be prepared: the scramble to meet the GDPR deadline 2018-05-22T14:43:58+01:00 2018-05-22T14:43:58+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13164-be-prepared-the-scramble-to-meet-the-gdpr-deadline CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Sean%20Dempsey%20(3).jpg" style="float:right; height:324px; margin:5px; width:250px">The new GDPR law aims to protect the privacy of personal data as a fundamental right. The GDPR provides greater protection for data subjects and greater responsibility for all companies. Tech companies will be greatly affected given the large amount of data under their control and how it is used. Some tech clients are worried that the algorithms used for their products, be it an app, a website or a software program, are built by a layering process and trying to remove one algorithm which holds the data requiring deletion, is like removing a piece from a delicate tower of jenga.</p> <p>The scope of the GDPR is linked to location of businesses and of data subjects.&nbsp; It applies to any business established in the EU &ndash; even if the processing is carried out in the US or elsewhere.&nbsp; It also applies to businesses outside the EU where data subjects are in the EU and processing relates to offering of goods or services.&nbsp; So a website in the US targeting EU based data subjects would need to comply.</p> <p>Some proponents of new economic models, have argued that individuals should take ownership of their personal data on a financial basis and that companies who make a profit on the collection and use of personal data, should pay a portion of that, to the owner of that data.</p> <h4>What to be concerned about</h4> <p>Both the definition of what is personal data needs to be considered, and further, what is a legitimate interest for keeping such personal data. Depending upon circumstances, companies must obtain consent for use of personal data, explain why they want it, how it will be used and for how long it will be kept.</p> <p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Alex%20Milner-Smith%20(USE).jpg" style="float:left; height:324px; margin:5px; width:250px">But, it is not sufficient to simply obtain consent. The business must assess how long to retain data, whether they have a legitimate interest in the data and whether it is securely kept. Companies should obtain as little data as legitimately justifiable and retain as little as necessary, then disseminate it only on a need to know basis. There are often competing interests to be considered here; for example, immigration rules requiring the retention of personal data for right to work and sponsorship reasons.</p> <p>Alex Milner-Smith, Partner at Lewis Silkin&rsquo;s London office and a specialist in GDPR, suggests that in the not too distant future, the EU may begin issuing certificates of GDPR compliance for use by the conscientious consumer. On the other hand, the penalties for infringement on the provisions of GDPR are hefty with fines for serious breaches going up to 20 million Euro or 4% of worldwide annual revenue, whichever is higher.</p> <h4>Time to be prepared</h4> <p>I can&rsquo;t count the number of emails I have received in the last three weeks from companies seeking to ensure their compliance in the race to the deadline. I&rsquo;d guess I&rsquo;ve had at least 30, maybe 50. But then, I do sign up to a few newsletters and I am guilty of a substantial online shopping habit. Even these re-permissioning emails may be a breach of GDPR though. Last year, significant companies including Flybe were fined by the Information Commissioner&rsquo;s Office for such marketing emails sent in order to comply with GDPR, which inadvertently breached GDPR instead.</p> <p>Given the deadline is almost upon us, companies should assess risks and prioritise. At Lewis Silkin, our GDPR experts have been working around the clock over the past months in the build up to this. It is likely they will continue to do so, well past the deadline as many companies are arriving very late to this particular party.</p> <p>Given the algorithmic jenga mentioned above, the purely technical aspects of trying to unravel systems in order to delete personal data, could take much longer than the GDPR legislative enforcement.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p></div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Sean%20Dempsey%20(3).jpg" style="float:right; height:324px; margin:5px; width:250px">The new GDPR law aims to protect the privacy of personal data as a fundamental right. The GDPR provides greater protection for data subjects and greater responsibility for all companies. Tech companies will be greatly affected given the large amount of data under their control and how it is used. Some tech clients are worried that the algorithms used for their products, be it an app, a website or a software program, are built by a layering process and trying to remove one algorithm which holds the data requiring deletion, is like removing a piece from a delicate tower of jenga.</p> <p>The scope of the GDPR is linked to location of businesses and of data subjects.&nbsp; It applies to any business established in the EU &ndash; even if the processing is carried out in the US or elsewhere.&nbsp; It also applies to businesses outside the EU where data subjects are in the EU and processing relates to offering of goods or services.&nbsp; So a website in the US targeting EU based data subjects would need to comply.</p> <p>Some proponents of new economic models, have argued that individuals should take ownership of their personal data on a financial basis and that companies who make a profit on the collection and use of personal data, should pay a portion of that, to the owner of that data.</p> <h4>What to be concerned about</h4> <p>Both the definition of what is personal data needs to be considered, and further, what is a legitimate interest for keeping such personal data. Depending upon circumstances, companies must obtain consent for use of personal data, explain why they want it, how it will be used and for how long it will be kept.</p> <p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Alex%20Milner-Smith%20(USE).jpg" style="float:left; height:324px; margin:5px; width:250px">But, it is not sufficient to simply obtain consent. The business must assess how long to retain data, whether they have a legitimate interest in the data and whether it is securely kept. Companies should obtain as little data as legitimately justifiable and retain as little as necessary, then disseminate it only on a need to know basis. There are often competing interests to be considered here; for example, immigration rules requiring the retention of personal data for right to work and sponsorship reasons.</p> <p>Alex Milner-Smith, Partner at Lewis Silkin&rsquo;s London office and a specialist in GDPR, suggests that in the not too distant future, the EU may begin issuing certificates of GDPR compliance for use by the conscientious consumer. On the other hand, the penalties for infringement on the provisions of GDPR are hefty with fines for serious breaches going up to 20 million Euro or 4% of worldwide annual revenue, whichever is higher.</p> <h4>Time to be prepared</h4> <p>I can&rsquo;t count the number of emails I have received in the last three weeks from companies seeking to ensure their compliance in the race to the deadline. I&rsquo;d guess I&rsquo;ve had at least 30, maybe 50. But then, I do sign up to a few newsletters and I am guilty of a substantial online shopping habit. Even these re-permissioning emails may be a breach of GDPR though. Last year, significant companies including Flybe were fined by the Information Commissioner&rsquo;s Office for such marketing emails sent in order to comply with GDPR, which inadvertently breached GDPR instead.</p> <p>Given the deadline is almost upon us, companies should assess risks and prioritise. At Lewis Silkin, our GDPR experts have been working around the clock over the past months in the build up to this. It is likely they will continue to do so, well past the deadline as many companies are arriving very late to this particular party.</p> <p>Given the algorithmic jenga mentioned above, the purely technical aspects of trying to unravel systems in order to delete personal data, could take much longer than the GDPR legislative enforcement.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p></div> GDPR’s far-reaching consequences for financial services 2018-05-22T13:46:21+01:00 2018-05-22T13:46:21+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13161-gdpr-s-far-reaching-consequences-for-financial-services CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The European Union is introducing the new General Data Protection Act (GDPR) to safeguard its citizens by standardising data privacy laws and mechanisms across all industries. It also empowers EU citizens by making them aware of the kind of personal data held by institutions and their rights for data protection and privacy.</p> <p>A consent-based system, GDPR carries the potentiality for huge breaches for non-compliance and violation. Individuals can request access to, or the removal of, their own personal data from companies and organisations. This is known as Data Portability. Financial institutions may keep some data to ensure compliance with other financial services regulations, but in all other circumstances where there is no valid justification, the individual&rsquo;s right to be forgotten &ndash; if desired &ndash; applies. This is, of course, what has prompted the recent flurry of consent permission email requests we&rsquo;ve all been getting in our inboxes lately!</p> <p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/financial-district.jpg" style="float:right; height:275px; margin:5px; width:400px">So, GDPR has been firmly centre stage on board agendas across financial services institutions over the last year with the sector busy preparing &ndash; and now in a good place - for its implementation on Friday 25 May. Of course, the financial services sector is long accustomed to data management compliance for both prudential and conduct regulation (e.g. Senior Management Arrangements,&nbsp;Systems&nbsp;and Controls (SYSC), Know Your Customer (KYC) and Anti Money Laundering (AML)) both in the UK and EU.</p> <p>Financial institutions handle and collate numerous types of customer data for client or customer onboarding, payments and trade transaction and ongoing relationship management and accounting. But, GDPR still represents a step change for financial services &ndash; particularly since there are multiple and complex touch points here &ndash; with its additional strengthened and enhanced data management protocols.</p> <p>Historically, financial services companies and organisations have kept data for significant periods of time. Now data protocols have been streamlined to minimise and restrict the movement of data and improve accuracy. A letter containing customer specific information, e.g. a statement, going to the wrong address, could be considered a breach under GDPR. After the Talk Talk breach, banks received queries from their customers, because the compromised data included bank details.</p> <p><em>Open Banking:</em> the financial services sector is also facing a double whammy &ndash; as GDPR comes hot on the heels of January&rsquo;s implementation of the Open Banking reforms and the revised Payments Services Directives (PSD2). This has created an expanded data interface and ecosystem, and new business relationships between customers and financial institutions in the shape of Third-Party Providers (TPPs). Now, authorised TPPS have access to customers data via financial institutions&rsquo; enabled open source APIs &ndash; all operating in a strengthened data security, authentication and consent framework under both PSD2 and GDPR.</p> <p><em>Third parties:</em> the increased trend towards outsourcing and third party contractual arrangement, particularly with Open Banking, means an expanded data exposure universe. As GDPR imposes end-to-end accountability to ensure client protection, this imposes obligations on both financial institutions and third party external vendors/outsourcing contracted parties. Financial institutions need to carefully manage their contracts with third parties as this represents a key risk to them.</p> <p><em>GDPR Breach:</em> Previously, firms were able to adopt their own protocols in the event of a data breach. Now, GDPR mandates that the Data Protection Office (DPO), an assigned individual who has overall responsibility to ensure compliance with all relevant data protection regulations, to notify any data breach (with details of the nature types and number of individuals impacted) to relevant supervisory authorities within 72 hours. The customer must be notified too, with remediation provided &lsquo;without undue delays&rsquo;.</p> <p>This is sobering stuff! Liability in the event of any breach is significant. For serious violations, such as failing to gain consent to process data or a breach of privacy by design, companies may be fined up to &euro;20 million, or 4 per cent of their global turnover (whichever is greater), while lesser violations, such as records not being in order or failure to notify the supervisory authorities, can still incur fines of 2 per cent of global turnover. Of course, there is also the additional, more intangible, knock-on cost from reputational damage and loss of future business.</p> <p><em>Subject Access Requests (SARs):</em> companies and organisations will also need to deal with SARs - from both customers and employees - quickly to avoid complaints going to the commissioner within 30 days (previously it was 40 days in the UK).</p> <p><em>Data ethics:</em> the introduction of GDPR follows closely on from several high-profile data breaches and incidents, including, most notably, social media site Facebook and Cambridge Analytica, plus Talk Talk. As well as unethical usage and negligence, GDPR comes against a backdrop and sharp rise in identity theft and wider cybercrime. So, consumers will migrate to trusted companies and organisations.</p> <p>But, good data management also offers the potential for companies and organisation to achieve competitive differentiation, plus confers greater benefits and growth opportunities in the wider digital economy. Therefore, a careful balance needs to be struck in exploiting commercial advantage and ensuring compliance with the new GDPR and wider regulatory frameworks.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}Melanie.Worthy@techUK.org{/bio}{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The European Union is introducing the new General Data Protection Act (GDPR) to safeguard its citizens by standardising data privacy laws and mechanisms across all industries. It also empowers EU citizens by making them aware of the kind of personal data held by institutions and their rights for data protection and privacy.</p> <p>A consent-based system, GDPR carries the potentiality for huge breaches for non-compliance and violation. Individuals can request access to, or the removal of, their own personal data from companies and organisations. This is known as Data Portability. Financial institutions may keep some data to ensure compliance with other financial services regulations, but in all other circumstances where there is no valid justification, the individual&rsquo;s right to be forgotten &ndash; if desired &ndash; applies. This is, of course, what has prompted the recent flurry of consent permission email requests we&rsquo;ve all been getting in our inboxes lately!</p> <p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/financial-district.jpg" style="float:right; height:275px; margin:5px; width:400px">So, GDPR has been firmly centre stage on board agendas across financial services institutions over the last year with the sector busy preparing &ndash; and now in a good place - for its implementation on Friday 25 May. Of course, the financial services sector is long accustomed to data management compliance for both prudential and conduct regulation (e.g. Senior Management Arrangements,&nbsp;Systems&nbsp;and Controls (SYSC), Know Your Customer (KYC) and Anti Money Laundering (AML)) both in the UK and EU.</p> <p>Financial institutions handle and collate numerous types of customer data for client or customer onboarding, payments and trade transaction and ongoing relationship management and accounting. But, GDPR still represents a step change for financial services &ndash; particularly since there are multiple and complex touch points here &ndash; with its additional strengthened and enhanced data management protocols.</p> <p>Historically, financial services companies and organisations have kept data for significant periods of time. Now data protocols have been streamlined to minimise and restrict the movement of data and improve accuracy. A letter containing customer specific information, e.g. a statement, going to the wrong address, could be considered a breach under GDPR. After the Talk Talk breach, banks received queries from their customers, because the compromised data included bank details.</p> <p><em>Open Banking:</em> the financial services sector is also facing a double whammy &ndash; as GDPR comes hot on the heels of January&rsquo;s implementation of the Open Banking reforms and the revised Payments Services Directives (PSD2). This has created an expanded data interface and ecosystem, and new business relationships between customers and financial institutions in the shape of Third-Party Providers (TPPs). Now, authorised TPPS have access to customers data via financial institutions&rsquo; enabled open source APIs &ndash; all operating in a strengthened data security, authentication and consent framework under both PSD2 and GDPR.</p> <p><em>Third parties:</em> the increased trend towards outsourcing and third party contractual arrangement, particularly with Open Banking, means an expanded data exposure universe. As GDPR imposes end-to-end accountability to ensure client protection, this imposes obligations on both financial institutions and third party external vendors/outsourcing contracted parties. Financial institutions need to carefully manage their contracts with third parties as this represents a key risk to them.</p> <p><em>GDPR Breach:</em> Previously, firms were able to adopt their own protocols in the event of a data breach. Now, GDPR mandates that the Data Protection Office (DPO), an assigned individual who has overall responsibility to ensure compliance with all relevant data protection regulations, to notify any data breach (with details of the nature types and number of individuals impacted) to relevant supervisory authorities within 72 hours. The customer must be notified too, with remediation provided &lsquo;without undue delays&rsquo;.</p> <p>This is sobering stuff! Liability in the event of any breach is significant. For serious violations, such as failing to gain consent to process data or a breach of privacy by design, companies may be fined up to &euro;20 million, or 4 per cent of their global turnover (whichever is greater), while lesser violations, such as records not being in order or failure to notify the supervisory authorities, can still incur fines of 2 per cent of global turnover. Of course, there is also the additional, more intangible, knock-on cost from reputational damage and loss of future business.</p> <p><em>Subject Access Requests (SARs):</em> companies and organisations will also need to deal with SARs - from both customers and employees - quickly to avoid complaints going to the commissioner within 30 days (previously it was 40 days in the UK).</p> <p><em>Data ethics:</em> the introduction of GDPR follows closely on from several high-profile data breaches and incidents, including, most notably, social media site Facebook and Cambridge Analytica, plus Talk Talk. As well as unethical usage and negligence, GDPR comes against a backdrop and sharp rise in identity theft and wider cybercrime. So, consumers will migrate to trusted companies and organisations.</p> <p>But, good data management also offers the potential for companies and organisation to achieve competitive differentiation, plus confers greater benefits and growth opportunities in the wider digital economy. Therefore, a careful balance needs to be struck in exploiting commercial advantage and ensuring compliance with the new GDPR and wider regulatory frameworks.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}Melanie.Worthy@techUK.org{/bio}{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Defence Secretary Announces Flagship Artificial Intelligence Lab 2018-05-22T12:19:55+01:00 2018-05-22T12:19:55+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/13160-defence-secretary-announces-flagship-artificial-intelligence-lab CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>As part of the MOD&rsquo;s commitment to pursue and deliver future capabilities, the Defence Secretary announced the launch of AI Lab &ndash; a single flagship for Artificial Intelligence, machine learning and data science at Dstl in Porton Down. AI Lab will enhance and accelerate the UK&rsquo;s world-class capability in the application of AI-related technologies to Defence and Security challenges. Dstl currently delivers more than &pound;20 million of research related to AI and this is forecast to grow significantly.</p> <p>AI Lab will engage in high-level research on areas from autonomous vehicles to intelligent systems; from countering fake news to using information to deter and de-escalate conflicts; and from enhanced computer network defences to improved decision aids for commanders. AI Lab provides tremendous opportunities to help keep the British public safe from a range of defence and security threats. This new creation will help Dstl contribute more fully to this vital challenge.</p> <p>The joint the US-UK Defence Innovation Board meeting enabled experts from across Defence and industry in the UK and US, to meet and discuss their experiences and innovation priorities.</p> <p>Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said:</p> <p><strong>&ldquo;The relationship we have with our American partners is indispensable to both our nations. In the face of evolving global threats, we must harness new technologies and approaches to stay ahead of our adversaries and keep us safe.</strong></p> <p><strong>Today&rsquo;s meeting of military and scientific minds from both sides of the Atlantic encourages our best and brightest to develop new capabilities in everything from Artificial Intelligence and autonomous weapons to advanced cyber and robotics&rdquo;.</strong></p> <p>Building upon this hugely important area of research, the Defence Secretary also announced a reciprocal UK Defence Innovation Board visit to the US later this year which will develop joint recommendations based on the needs of the MOD and its American partners.</p> <p>In addition, the UK&rsquo;s Defence External Advisory Panel has published findings from their independent report which examines how the MOD can become &lsquo;innovative by instinct&rsquo;. The report highlighted a requirement to expand capabilities in cyber defence and information technology systems but also the need to streamline procurement processes and the implementation of ground-breaking abilities.</p> <p>For the official government announcement, <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/flagship-ai-lab-announced-as-defence-secretary-hosts-first-meet-between-british-and-american-defence-innovators"><u>please click here</u></a>.</p>{bio}dan.patefield@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}fred.sugden@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>As part of the MOD&rsquo;s commitment to pursue and deliver future capabilities, the Defence Secretary announced the launch of AI Lab &ndash; a single flagship for Artificial Intelligence, machine learning and data science at Dstl in Porton Down. AI Lab will enhance and accelerate the UK&rsquo;s world-class capability in the application of AI-related technologies to Defence and Security challenges. Dstl currently delivers more than &pound;20 million of research related to AI and this is forecast to grow significantly.</p> <p>AI Lab will engage in high-level research on areas from autonomous vehicles to intelligent systems; from countering fake news to using information to deter and de-escalate conflicts; and from enhanced computer network defences to improved decision aids for commanders. AI Lab provides tremendous opportunities to help keep the British public safe from a range of defence and security threats. This new creation will help Dstl contribute more fully to this vital challenge.</p> <p>The joint the US-UK Defence Innovation Board meeting enabled experts from across Defence and industry in the UK and US, to meet and discuss their experiences and innovation priorities.</p> <p>Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said:</p> <p><strong>&ldquo;The relationship we have with our American partners is indispensable to both our nations. In the face of evolving global threats, we must harness new technologies and approaches to stay ahead of our adversaries and keep us safe.</strong></p> <p><strong>Today&rsquo;s meeting of military and scientific minds from both sides of the Atlantic encourages our best and brightest to develop new capabilities in everything from Artificial Intelligence and autonomous weapons to advanced cyber and robotics&rdquo;.</strong></p> <p>Building upon this hugely important area of research, the Defence Secretary also announced a reciprocal UK Defence Innovation Board visit to the US later this year which will develop joint recommendations based on the needs of the MOD and its American partners.</p> <p>In addition, the UK&rsquo;s Defence External Advisory Panel has published findings from their independent report which examines how the MOD can become &lsquo;innovative by instinct&rsquo;. The report highlighted a requirement to expand capabilities in cyber defence and information technology systems but also the need to streamline procurement processes and the implementation of ground-breaking abilities.</p> <p>For the official government announcement, <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/flagship-ai-lab-announced-as-defence-secretary-hosts-first-meet-between-british-and-american-defence-innovators"><u>please click here</u></a>.</p>{bio}dan.patefield@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}fred.sugden@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Importance of continued UK-EU data flows 2018-05-22T12:17:26+01:00 2018-05-22T12:17:26+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/events/opportunity/item/13158-importance-of-continued-uk-eu-data-flows CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Join Syed Kamall MEP, leader of the ECR group, and techUK in the <strong>European Parliament, ASP 1H1, on</strong> <strong>Tuesday 5 June 15.00 &ndash; 17.00</strong> to discuss one of the most important issues impacting the European tech sector: the continued free flow of data between the UK and EU.</p> <p>The withdrawal of the UK from the European Union has caused uncertainty across a number of important areas. Arguably the most important area for the growing digital economy is the ability for data to continue to flow between the UK and the EU. This is crucial for businesses across Europe in all economic sectors. The European data economy is expected to be worth &euro;739 billion by 2020 and a key element to realising this potential is ensuring that data can continue to flow.</p> <p>Along with Syed Kamall MEP and techUK representatives, we will be joined by EU officials and businesses. More details to be confirmed.</p> <p>The event follows a report published by techUK entitled <a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/11824-rapid-action-needed-to-safeguard-uk-eu-businesses-consumers-following-brexit">&lsquo;No Interruptions: options for the future UK-EU data sharing arrangement&rsquo;</a> and will look at the importance of continued data flows between the UK and the EU post-Brexit and how to achieve it.</p> <p>The United Kingdom has been involved in the development of EU data protection policy for a long time, and the UK Government has committed to maintain the new EU General Data Protection Regulation post-Brexit, demonstrating its commitment to Europe&rsquo;s approach to data protection. The UK also operates in a unique position in the global system of data flows. While accounting for roughly 3 per cent of global GDP, the UK accounts for 11.5 per cent of global data flows, 75 per cent of which are between the UK and the EU. Data flows underpin almost every sector of the European economy, and are critical to facilitating trade and doing business across borders. Data flows also facilitate important medical research, detecting financial crime and have an important role to play in wider security cooperation. Whatever the future relationship between the UK and the EU, data flows will need to be at the heart.</p> <p>This event in the European Parliament will provide an opportunity to demonstrate the importance of UK-EU data flows to the entire European economy, and will offer the chance for interested policy makers, businesses and stakeholders to discuss how best to achieve a solution to data flows that benefits the entire European economy. Register now to book your place.</p></div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Join Syed Kamall MEP, leader of the ECR group, and techUK in the <strong>European Parliament, ASP 1H1, on</strong> <strong>Tuesday 5 June 15.00 &ndash; 17.00</strong> to discuss one of the most important issues impacting the European tech sector: the continued free flow of data between the UK and EU.</p> <p>The withdrawal of the UK from the European Union has caused uncertainty across a number of important areas. Arguably the most important area for the growing digital economy is the ability for data to continue to flow between the UK and the EU. This is crucial for businesses across Europe in all economic sectors. The European data economy is expected to be worth &euro;739 billion by 2020 and a key element to realising this potential is ensuring that data can continue to flow.</p> <p>Along with Syed Kamall MEP and techUK representatives, we will be joined by EU officials and businesses. More details to be confirmed.</p> <p>The event follows a report published by techUK entitled <a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/11824-rapid-action-needed-to-safeguard-uk-eu-businesses-consumers-following-brexit">&lsquo;No Interruptions: options for the future UK-EU data sharing arrangement&rsquo;</a> and will look at the importance of continued data flows between the UK and the EU post-Brexit and how to achieve it.</p> <p>The United Kingdom has been involved in the development of EU data protection policy for a long time, and the UK Government has committed to maintain the new EU General Data Protection Regulation post-Brexit, demonstrating its commitment to Europe&rsquo;s approach to data protection. The UK also operates in a unique position in the global system of data flows. While accounting for roughly 3 per cent of global GDP, the UK accounts for 11.5 per cent of global data flows, 75 per cent of which are between the UK and the EU. Data flows underpin almost every sector of the European economy, and are critical to facilitating trade and doing business across borders. Data flows also facilitate important medical research, detecting financial crime and have an important role to play in wider security cooperation. Whatever the future relationship between the UK and the EU, data flows will need to be at the heart.</p> <p>This event in the European Parliament will provide an opportunity to demonstrate the importance of UK-EU data flows to the entire European economy, and will offer the chance for interested policy makers, businesses and stakeholders to discuss how best to achieve a solution to data flows that benefits the entire European economy. Register now to book your place.</p></div> SPF C2&3: Release Mechanisms & Flexible Spectrum Access - Meeting Note 2018-05-22T10:53:21+01:00 2018-05-22T10:53:21+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/meeting-notes/item/13155-spf-c2-3-release-mechanisms-flexible-spectrum-access-meeting-note CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Presentations from the UK Spectrum Policy Forum 2 &amp; 3: Release Mechanisms &amp; Flexible Spectrum Access workshop on 21 May 2018.<br><strong>Chairs:</strong>&nbsp;Peter Curnow-Ford, CEO,&nbsp;Viatec Associates Ltd &amp; Tony Lavender, CEO,&nbsp;Plum Consulting London LLP</p> <p><em>These presentations are embedded for ease of access, they are available in PDF format at the end of the page.&nbsp;</em></p> <p><u>Agenda</u></p> <p><strong>Introduction<br> Louise Lancaster</strong>, Regulatory and Policy Lead, 5G Team, DCMS</p> <p><strong>1.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong><strong>Flexible Spectrum Access</strong></p> <p><strong><em>Update on Report</em></strong><br> Tony Lavender, Chair of Cluster 3, UK Spectrum Policy Forum</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe frameborder="0" height="485" scrolling="no" src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/JVckFCH4WF338C" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" width="595"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp; </p><p><strong><em>Flexible Spectrum Access and 6GHz WiFi</em></strong><br> Cliff Mason, Spectrum Policy Manager, Ofcom</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe frameborder="0" height="485" scrolling="no" src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/5Hg60oV3dT98i" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" width="595"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp; </p><p><strong>Nigel King,</strong>&nbsp;Director of Regulatory Affairs, UKWISPA</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe frameborder="0" height="485" scrolling="no" src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/LSTEBRRpn5v4Kk" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" width="595"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp; </p><p><em>Panel discussion</em><br> &nbsp;</p> <p><strong>2.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong><strong>Release Mechanisms &amp; Licensing</strong></p> <p><strong><em>Intro and Scene setting</em></strong><br> Peter Curnow Ford, Chair of Cluster 2, UK Spectrum Policy Forum</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe frameborder="0" height="485" scrolling="no" src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/cQWcfuzhojBTvU" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" width="595"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp; </p><p><strong>Abhaya Sumanasena</strong>, Managing Consultant, Real Wireless</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe frameborder="0" height="485" scrolling="no" src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/syB4EibBYPMVnQ" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" width="595"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp; </p><p><strong><em>Making a success of 5G for the 9 million people who live in Rural Britain with the aid of dynamic spectrum access</em></strong><br> Professor Stephen Temple, 5G IC, University of Surrey</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe frameborder="0" height="485" scrolling="no" src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/qBAlOqZ1Lr2ebH" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" width="595"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp; </p><p><em>Panel discussion</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>More information about the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.techuk.org/about/uk-spectrum-policy-forum" target="_blank">UK Spectrum Policy Forum</a>&nbsp;is available here.&nbsp;SPF workshop discussions&nbsp;are&nbsp;held under Chatham House Rule to enable cross-industry collaborative discussion.</p>{bio}skye.macleod@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}sophie.weston@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Presentations from the UK Spectrum Policy Forum 2 &amp; 3: Release Mechanisms &amp; Flexible Spectrum Access workshop on 21 May 2018.<br><strong>Chairs:</strong>&nbsp;Peter Curnow-Ford, CEO,&nbsp;Viatec Associates Ltd &amp; Tony Lavender, CEO,&nbsp;Plum Consulting London LLP</p> <p><em>These presentations are embedded for ease of access, they are available in PDF format at the end of the page.&nbsp;</em></p> <p><u>Agenda</u></p> <p><strong>Introduction<br> Louise Lancaster</strong>, Regulatory and Policy Lead, 5G Team, DCMS</p> <p><strong>1.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong><strong>Flexible Spectrum Access</strong></p> <p><strong><em>Update on Report</em></strong><br> Tony Lavender, Chair of Cluster 3, UK Spectrum Policy Forum</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe frameborder="0" height="485" scrolling="no" src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/JVckFCH4WF338C" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" width="595"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp; </p><p><strong><em>Flexible Spectrum Access and 6GHz WiFi</em></strong><br> Cliff Mason, Spectrum Policy Manager, Ofcom</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe frameborder="0" height="485" scrolling="no" src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/5Hg60oV3dT98i" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" width="595"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp; </p><p><strong>Nigel King,</strong>&nbsp;Director of Regulatory Affairs, UKWISPA</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe frameborder="0" height="485" scrolling="no" src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/LSTEBRRpn5v4Kk" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" width="595"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp; </p><p><em>Panel discussion</em><br> &nbsp;</p> <p><strong>2.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong><strong>Release Mechanisms &amp; Licensing</strong></p> <p><strong><em>Intro and Scene setting</em></strong><br> Peter Curnow Ford, Chair of Cluster 2, UK Spectrum Policy Forum</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe frameborder="0" height="485" scrolling="no" src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/cQWcfuzhojBTvU" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" width="595"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp; </p><p><strong>Abhaya Sumanasena</strong>, Managing Consultant, Real Wireless</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe frameborder="0" height="485" scrolling="no" src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/syB4EibBYPMVnQ" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" width="595"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp; </p><p><strong><em>Making a success of 5G for the 9 million people who live in Rural Britain with the aid of dynamic spectrum access</em></strong><br> Professor Stephen Temple, 5G IC, University of Surrey</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe frameborder="0" height="485" scrolling="no" src="//www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/qBAlOqZ1Lr2ebH" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" width="595"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp; </p><p><em>Panel discussion</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>More information about the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.techuk.org/about/uk-spectrum-policy-forum" target="_blank">UK Spectrum Policy Forum</a>&nbsp;is available here.&nbsp;SPF workshop discussions&nbsp;are&nbsp;held under Chatham House Rule to enable cross-industry collaborative discussion.</p>{bio}skye.macleod@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}sophie.weston@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Here’s what we can expect as NIS and GDPR arrive 2018-05-22T12:00:00+01:00 2018-05-22T12:00:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13153-here-s-what-we-can-expect-as-nis-and-gdpr-arrive CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><a href="https://researchcenter.paloaltonetworks.com/2018/05/cso-heres-can-expect-nis-gdpr-arrive/"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>A longer version of this article was originally posted on the Palo Alto website.</em></span></a></p> <p>I<img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Greg%20Day%20Palo%20Alto%20photo-min%20(1).jpg" style="float:right; height:450px; margin:5px; width:300px">t&rsquo;s May, which means GDPR will take effect in days now.&nbsp;In the same month, we&nbsp;have&nbsp;new&nbsp;legislation around the protection of digital-enabled critical infrastructure in the Network and Information Security (NIS) Directive.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>And there&rsquo;s more to come in the EU, with the draft <a href="https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/better-regulation/initiative/111956/attachment/090166e5b507c22c_en"><span style="color:#0000FF">Cybersecurity Act</span></a>&nbsp;and its proposed EU cybersecurity certification framework, currently going through the European Parliament, plus the Electronic Communications Code, which will update regulations for Europe&rsquo;s telecom industry and includes security requirements for these companies, <a href="http://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/policies/electronic-communications-code/"><span style="color:#0000FF">nearing final stages of negotiations in Brussels</span></a>.</p> <p>We use technology every day, and the digital world touches every part of our lives. GDPR, NIS and other changes in regulation are set up to ensure every&nbsp;organisation&nbsp;takes cybersecurity seriously. This is good, right?&nbsp;</p> <p>Every day, I hear from some organizations how they are preparing well for GDPR, and yet&nbsp;others&nbsp;are&nbsp;still asking questions which would indicate they are ill-prepared.&nbsp;&nbsp; Some organizations still talk of waiting for the first fines to hit others before they will take it seriously.&nbsp;</p> <p>So, what can we expect?&nbsp;</p> <h3>Examples will be made of noncompliant organizations&hellip;&nbsp;</h3> <p>I&rsquo;m no lawyer and can&rsquo;t argue the finer points of enforceability. But&nbsp;new regulations tend to come with significant penalties to ensure executives take them seriously. Whilst heavy&nbsp;fines&nbsp;should&nbsp;be a final resort, companies that have flaunted the requirements should be prepared for the worst.&nbsp;</p> <h3>&hellip;but the impact of GDPR enforcement is likely months away&nbsp;</h3> <p>I suspect we won&rsquo;t see those examples made right away. It takes time to investigate and define just how bad violations were. If we assume the worst &ndash; poor documentation, poor metrics and little legacy evidence &ndash; it&rsquo;s likely that assessments could take months; and this is before lawyers start to negotiate the end outcome, testing and setting the legal precedents and culpabilities of those involved. As such it may be much later in 2018 before we see the real impact of GDPR.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Management teams will seek a much deeper understanding of local laws&nbsp;</h3> <p>The NIS Directive came into effect on May 10th&nbsp;and&nbsp;is a little harder to get your head around. Not to be confused with a regulation, the NIS Directive is an instruction to EU member state governments to implement their own laws in support of the directive&rsquo;s goals. Some countries have existing laws that they need to update slightly; others require further adaptation, and for some, this may be a whole new requirement.&nbsp;So,&nbsp;depending on whether and where you provide the essential or digital services covered under NIS, you will need to look at each local implementation of the directive, if you are covered, and what you need to do.&nbsp;</p> <p>Your team will need to be able to explain the following:&nbsp;</p> <ol><li>What will be the local (domestic) law <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2018/506/regulation/1/made"><span style="color:#0000FF">implementing the NIS Directive and when is it due to come into effect?</span></a></li> <li>Which national authority or entity will be responsible for applying and potentially enforcing the local law? In the&nbsp;UK,&nbsp;the&nbsp;NCSC is the central coordination point, but the <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nis-regulations-guidance-for-competent-authorities"><span style="color:#0000FF">existing, competent authorities in each specific, covered critical national infrastructure (CNI) sector</span></a> will continue to be the lead engagement points for that industry space.</li> <li>What will be the framework they use to define and measure the required controls? Noting that NIS does include the requirement for prevention, early views would suggest many may adopt ISO, NIST or other tried and tested methodologies.&nbsp;</li> </ol><p>If you are well on your GDPR journey, I applaud you. For those hanging back, I encourage you to get started. This is real, and there are the implications that go with it. And, don&rsquo;t downplay the NIS Directive just because it&rsquo;s not generating the same volume of headlines as GDPR. The realities of NIS implementation are no less significant, and the cybersecurity bar it sets, considering the essential services it focuses on, are even higher than GDPR&rsquo;s.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a>&nbsp;</p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><a href="https://researchcenter.paloaltonetworks.com/2018/05/cso-heres-can-expect-nis-gdpr-arrive/"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>A longer version of this article was originally posted on the Palo Alto website.</em></span></a></p> <p>I<img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Greg%20Day%20Palo%20Alto%20photo-min%20(1).jpg" style="float:right; height:450px; margin:5px; width:300px">t&rsquo;s May, which means GDPR will take effect in days now.&nbsp;In the same month, we&nbsp;have&nbsp;new&nbsp;legislation around the protection of digital-enabled critical infrastructure in the Network and Information Security (NIS) Directive.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>And there&rsquo;s more to come in the EU, with the draft <a href="https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/better-regulation/initiative/111956/attachment/090166e5b507c22c_en"><span style="color:#0000FF">Cybersecurity Act</span></a>&nbsp;and its proposed EU cybersecurity certification framework, currently going through the European Parliament, plus the Electronic Communications Code, which will update regulations for Europe&rsquo;s telecom industry and includes security requirements for these companies, <a href="http://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/policies/electronic-communications-code/"><span style="color:#0000FF">nearing final stages of negotiations in Brussels</span></a>.</p> <p>We use technology every day, and the digital world touches every part of our lives. GDPR, NIS and other changes in regulation are set up to ensure every&nbsp;organisation&nbsp;takes cybersecurity seriously. This is good, right?&nbsp;</p> <p>Every day, I hear from some organizations how they are preparing well for GDPR, and yet&nbsp;others&nbsp;are&nbsp;still asking questions which would indicate they are ill-prepared.&nbsp;&nbsp; Some organizations still talk of waiting for the first fines to hit others before they will take it seriously.&nbsp;</p> <p>So, what can we expect?&nbsp;</p> <h3>Examples will be made of noncompliant organizations&hellip;&nbsp;</h3> <p>I&rsquo;m no lawyer and can&rsquo;t argue the finer points of enforceability. But&nbsp;new regulations tend to come with significant penalties to ensure executives take them seriously. Whilst heavy&nbsp;fines&nbsp;should&nbsp;be a final resort, companies that have flaunted the requirements should be prepared for the worst.&nbsp;</p> <h3>&hellip;but the impact of GDPR enforcement is likely months away&nbsp;</h3> <p>I suspect we won&rsquo;t see those examples made right away. It takes time to investigate and define just how bad violations were. If we assume the worst &ndash; poor documentation, poor metrics and little legacy evidence &ndash; it&rsquo;s likely that assessments could take months; and this is before lawyers start to negotiate the end outcome, testing and setting the legal precedents and culpabilities of those involved. As such it may be much later in 2018 before we see the real impact of GDPR.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Management teams will seek a much deeper understanding of local laws&nbsp;</h3> <p>The NIS Directive came into effect on May 10th&nbsp;and&nbsp;is a little harder to get your head around. Not to be confused with a regulation, the NIS Directive is an instruction to EU member state governments to implement their own laws in support of the directive&rsquo;s goals. Some countries have existing laws that they need to update slightly; others require further adaptation, and for some, this may be a whole new requirement.&nbsp;So,&nbsp;depending on whether and where you provide the essential or digital services covered under NIS, you will need to look at each local implementation of the directive, if you are covered, and what you need to do.&nbsp;</p> <p>Your team will need to be able to explain the following:&nbsp;</p> <ol><li>What will be the local (domestic) law <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2018/506/regulation/1/made"><span style="color:#0000FF">implementing the NIS Directive and when is it due to come into effect?</span></a></li> <li>Which national authority or entity will be responsible for applying and potentially enforcing the local law? In the&nbsp;UK,&nbsp;the&nbsp;NCSC is the central coordination point, but the <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nis-regulations-guidance-for-competent-authorities"><span style="color:#0000FF">existing, competent authorities in each specific, covered critical national infrastructure (CNI) sector</span></a> will continue to be the lead engagement points for that industry space.</li> <li>What will be the framework they use to define and measure the required controls? Noting that NIS does include the requirement for prevention, early views would suggest many may adopt ISO, NIST or other tried and tested methodologies.&nbsp;</li> </ol><p>If you are well on your GDPR journey, I applaud you. For those hanging back, I encourage you to get started. This is real, and there are the implications that go with it. And, don&rsquo;t downplay the NIS Directive just because it&rsquo;s not generating the same volume of headlines as GDPR. The realities of NIS implementation are no less significant, and the cybersecurity bar it sets, considering the essential services it focuses on, are even higher than GDPR&rsquo;s.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a>&nbsp;</p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Do you really need a DPO? 2018-05-22T09:00:00+01:00 2018-05-22T09:00:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13152-do-you-really-need-a-dpo CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Christopher%20Beveridge%20(NS)%20High%20res.%20colour.jpg" style="float:left; height:266px; margin:5px; width:400px">With&nbsp;the constant discussion currently around the impending General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the role of a data protection officer (DPO) or data compliance officer (DCO) has never been so much in the public eye. With just over six months until implementation of GDPR, organisations need to start assessing their possible requirement for a DPO. In fact, it is predicted that 28,000 additional DPOs will be required by organisations to achieve GDPR compliance by 25 May 2018.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> A DPO is a significant position within an organisation, responsible for overseeing data protection strategy and implementation to ensure compliance with the new GDPR requirements by 25 May 2018.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> A DPO will be a requirement for organisations under GDPR if they process or store large amounts of personal data, whether for employees, individuals external to the organisation, or both. DPOs must be appointed where the core activities of the controller or processor involve regular and systematic monitoring of data subjects on a large scale, or where the entity conducts large scale processing of special categories of personal data.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> Some of the responsibilities of a DPO include educating the organisation and its employees on important compliance requirements, training staff involved in data processing, and conducting regular security audits. DPOs also serve as the point of contact between the organisation and any supervisory authorities that oversee activities related to data.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> If your organisation falls outside of the scope to have a mandatory DPO, there is still a requirement under the new regulation for you to have a data compliance officer. A DCO is best defined as an individual designated with the role of ensuring compliance with any regulatory requirements and is known to be the point of contact across the organisation who will be expected to handle any events that materialise in respect of data protection.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> Although a less significant role within an organisation, a DCO is still expected to fulfil&nbsp;the majority of&nbsp;the responsibilities of a DPO. One of the requirements of a data compliance officer is to keep an internal record log of data protection issues and conversations that have been held within the organisation within the period being recorded.&nbsp;</p> <h3>How we can help&nbsp;&#8239;&nbsp;</h3> <p><a href="http://www.moorestephens.co.uk"><span style="color:#0000FF">Moore Stephens</span></a>&nbsp;offers an outsourced service to ensure your organisation meets the DPO or DCO requirements under GDPR. Some of the services we provide include a privacy risk assessment, a full compliance monitoring plan as well as acting as a helpdesk internally for your organisation.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> For more details, please contact&nbsp;<a href="mailto:christopher.beveridge@moorestephens.com?subject=Do%20you%20need%20a%20DPO?"><span style="color:#0000FF">Chris Beveridge</span></a>, Global Head of Privacy at Moore Stephens.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p> <ul></ul>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Christopher%20Beveridge%20(NS)%20High%20res.%20colour.jpg" style="float:left; height:266px; margin:5px; width:400px">With&nbsp;the constant discussion currently around the impending General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the role of a data protection officer (DPO) or data compliance officer (DCO) has never been so much in the public eye. With just over six months until implementation of GDPR, organisations need to start assessing their possible requirement for a DPO. In fact, it is predicted that 28,000 additional DPOs will be required by organisations to achieve GDPR compliance by 25 May 2018.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> A DPO is a significant position within an organisation, responsible for overseeing data protection strategy and implementation to ensure compliance with the new GDPR requirements by 25 May 2018.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> A DPO will be a requirement for organisations under GDPR if they process or store large amounts of personal data, whether for employees, individuals external to the organisation, or both. DPOs must be appointed where the core activities of the controller or processor involve regular and systematic monitoring of data subjects on a large scale, or where the entity conducts large scale processing of special categories of personal data.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> Some of the responsibilities of a DPO include educating the organisation and its employees on important compliance requirements, training staff involved in data processing, and conducting regular security audits. DPOs also serve as the point of contact between the organisation and any supervisory authorities that oversee activities related to data.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> If your organisation falls outside of the scope to have a mandatory DPO, there is still a requirement under the new regulation for you to have a data compliance officer. A DCO is best defined as an individual designated with the role of ensuring compliance with any regulatory requirements and is known to be the point of contact across the organisation who will be expected to handle any events that materialise in respect of data protection.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> Although a less significant role within an organisation, a DCO is still expected to fulfil&nbsp;the majority of&nbsp;the responsibilities of a DPO. One of the requirements of a data compliance officer is to keep an internal record log of data protection issues and conversations that have been held within the organisation within the period being recorded.&nbsp;</p> <h3>How we can help&nbsp;&#8239;&nbsp;</h3> <p><a href="http://www.moorestephens.co.uk"><span style="color:#0000FF">Moore Stephens</span></a>&nbsp;offers an outsourced service to ensure your organisation meets the DPO or DCO requirements under GDPR. Some of the services we provide include a privacy risk assessment, a full compliance monitoring plan as well as acting as a helpdesk internally for your organisation.&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;<br> For more details, please contact&nbsp;<a href="mailto:christopher.beveridge@moorestephens.com?subject=Do%20you%20need%20a%20DPO?"><span style="color:#0000FF">Chris Beveridge</span></a>, Global Head of Privacy at Moore Stephens.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p> <ul></ul>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Using Digital to Solve Problems and Improve Local Public Service Outcomes 2018-05-21T16:20:59+01:00 2018-05-21T16:20:59+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/events/briefing/item/13151-using-digital-to-solve-problems-and-improve-local-public-service-outcomes CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Councils are faced with a range of challenges: from demographic change, environmental crime, housing and adult social care, to improvement of employment opportunities. Managing demand and rising expectations at a continued time of financial constraints is no easy feat and, as such, councils are embracing digital technology as an enabler to do things differently and to deliver more efficient, improved services.</p> <p>The recent GovTech Catalyst challenge also recognises the important role technology can play to tackle the major social challenges we face and to improve public services. On 10 May Minister for Implementation, Oliver Dowden, <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-calls-on-technology-firms-to-help-tackle-the-uks-biggest-challenges">announced the first round of competition</a> and a number of the challenges submitted come from local authorities.</p> <p>At this briefing we are delighted to welcome <strong>Matthew Hooper, Director of Commissioning (Enforcement &amp; Safety), Newham Council</strong> to hear how the council has applied digital to tackle environmental crime.</p> <p>A key component in creating the environment to enable successful transformation is leadership and culture. Having the leadership in place that recognises how council services can be transformed by new technologies is pivotal. Without the buy-in from the top, the digital ambition can fall by the wayside. We are also delighted to welcome <strong>Councillor Stephen Canning from Essex Council</strong> to tell us more about the councils digital journey but also bringing colleagues on the digital journeys, from officers to elected officials.</p> <p>This event will be an opportunity to bring together tech industry and local government to showcase the good work happening locally; how councils are applying digital to solve local problems and manage demand; and the key asks from the local government market to suppliers in a changing landscape.</p> <p>Key topics to be discussed include:</p> <ul><li>Managing demand and understanding what the core problem areas are for your local area;</li> <li>Reframing the conversation: How can suppliers help councils articulate the problem and take a more challenge led approach to procurement</li> <li>What will be the impact if councils don&rsquo;t do things differently using digital;</li> <li>Culture and leadership: Bringing senior leadership team on the digital journey to understand what the &lsquo;art of the possible&rsquo; is</li> <li>Best practice in developing a digital strategy and what the key digital priorities are based on user need and demand</li> <li>The technologies revolutionising local public service outcomes</li> </ul><p>*Further speakers to be confirmed.*</p> <p>This event is open to local government and wider public sector. If you would like to attend please email Georgina Maratheftis.</p>{bio}georgina.maratheftis@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Councils are faced with a range of challenges: from demographic change, environmental crime, housing and adult social care, to improvement of employment opportunities. Managing demand and rising expectations at a continued time of financial constraints is no easy feat and, as such, councils are embracing digital technology as an enabler to do things differently and to deliver more efficient, improved services.</p> <p>The recent GovTech Catalyst challenge also recognises the important role technology can play to tackle the major social challenges we face and to improve public services. On 10 May Minister for Implementation, Oliver Dowden, <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-calls-on-technology-firms-to-help-tackle-the-uks-biggest-challenges">announced the first round of competition</a> and a number of the challenges submitted come from local authorities.</p> <p>At this briefing we are delighted to welcome <strong>Matthew Hooper, Director of Commissioning (Enforcement &amp; Safety), Newham Council</strong> to hear how the council has applied digital to tackle environmental crime.</p> <p>A key component in creating the environment to enable successful transformation is leadership and culture. Having the leadership in place that recognises how council services can be transformed by new technologies is pivotal. Without the buy-in from the top, the digital ambition can fall by the wayside. We are also delighted to welcome <strong>Councillor Stephen Canning from Essex Council</strong> to tell us more about the councils digital journey but also bringing colleagues on the digital journeys, from officers to elected officials.</p> <p>This event will be an opportunity to bring together tech industry and local government to showcase the good work happening locally; how councils are applying digital to solve local problems and manage demand; and the key asks from the local government market to suppliers in a changing landscape.</p> <p>Key topics to be discussed include:</p> <ul><li>Managing demand and understanding what the core problem areas are for your local area;</li> <li>Reframing the conversation: How can suppliers help councils articulate the problem and take a more challenge led approach to procurement</li> <li>What will be the impact if councils don&rsquo;t do things differently using digital;</li> <li>Culture and leadership: Bringing senior leadership team on the digital journey to understand what the &lsquo;art of the possible&rsquo; is</li> <li>Best practice in developing a digital strategy and what the key digital priorities are based on user need and demand</li> <li>The technologies revolutionising local public service outcomes</li> </ul><p>*Further speakers to be confirmed.*</p> <p>This event is open to local government and wider public sector. If you would like to attend please email Georgina Maratheftis.</p>{bio}georgina.maratheftis@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Round-up of techUK-HACT Innovation Showcase 2018-05-21T14:33:52+01:00 2018-05-21T14:33:52+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/meeting-notes/item/13150-round-up-of-techuk-hact-innovation-showcase CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Earlier this month techUK partnered with <a href="https://www.hact.org.uk/">HACT</a>&nbsp;to host a <a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/workshop/item/12777-technology-in-social-housing-2018-innovation-launchpad-showcase">Innovation Launchpad Showcase</a> to demonstrate the potential for technologies to assist Housing Associations in a range of problem and challenge areas. We heard from 9 technology providers and got hands on with some of their technology too which ranged from integrated platforms to smart key and lock solutions to smart thermostats and energy control.&nbsp;</p> <p>The day saw mini-pitches from a range of companies on some technology which is either pre-market or currently in a different market with the afternoon focused on commons barriers to entry into the market with case studies from where innovation is in action. With several housing associations in attendance there was an informed conversation about the need for digital leadership and a more uniform approach from housing associations whilst there are still clearly lessons to be learned in industry about how to approach housing associations with innovative and tailored solutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>The slides from the day are below and contain contact details for the companies who demonstrated.&nbsp;</p> <p>techUK will continue to work with HACT and housing associations on how to ensure that the two sectors can better understand each other and explore the opportunity that exists for techUK members.&nbsp;</p> <p>You can read more about techUK's relationship with HACT and the <a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/12928-housing-sector-call-for-proposals-on-assisted-living-technology">social care challenge that is made to the tech sector here</a>.&nbsp;</p>{bio}Matthew.Evans@techUK.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Earlier this month techUK partnered with <a href="https://www.hact.org.uk/">HACT</a>&nbsp;to host a <a href="https://www.techuk.org/events/workshop/item/12777-technology-in-social-housing-2018-innovation-launchpad-showcase">Innovation Launchpad Showcase</a> to demonstrate the potential for technologies to assist Housing Associations in a range of problem and challenge areas. We heard from 9 technology providers and got hands on with some of their technology too which ranged from integrated platforms to smart key and lock solutions to smart thermostats and energy control.&nbsp;</p> <p>The day saw mini-pitches from a range of companies on some technology which is either pre-market or currently in a different market with the afternoon focused on commons barriers to entry into the market with case studies from where innovation is in action. With several housing associations in attendance there was an informed conversation about the need for digital leadership and a more uniform approach from housing associations whilst there are still clearly lessons to be learned in industry about how to approach housing associations with innovative and tailored solutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>The slides from the day are below and contain contact details for the companies who demonstrated.&nbsp;</p> <p>techUK will continue to work with HACT and housing associations on how to ensure that the two sectors can better understand each other and explore the opportunity that exists for techUK members.&nbsp;</p> <p>You can read more about techUK's relationship with HACT and the <a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/12928-housing-sector-call-for-proposals-on-assisted-living-technology">social care challenge that is made to the tech sector here</a>.&nbsp;</p>{bio}Matthew.Evans@techUK.org{/bio}</div> Defence Secretary launches UK's first Defence Space Strategy 2018-05-21T13:05:35+01:00 2018-05-21T13:05:35+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/13149-defence-secretary-launches-uk-s-first-defence-space-strategy CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>With an increasing amount of the UK&rsquo;s military systems now dependent on space technology, the MOD has today announced that RAF Air Command has assumed responsibility for command and control of UK military space operations to defend the UK&rsquo;s interests in space. The Defence Secretary has also confirmed his intention to boost the 500 personnel currently working in the UK defence space sector by a fifth over the next five years, taking the total to over 600. The new Defence Space Strategy, expected in the summer, will set out plans to protect UK operations against emerging space-based threats such as jamming of civilian satellites used for broadcasters and satellite navigation to support military capabilities.</p> <p>Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said:</p> <p>"We must make sure we are primed and ready to deter and counter the intensifying threats to our everyday life that are emerging in space. That&rsquo;s why today I&rsquo;m announcing the RAF is taking the lead in this area and why we plan to increase the number of personnel covering space.</p> <p>Satellite technology is not just a crucial tool for our Armed Forces but vital to our way of life, whether that be access to our mobile phones, the internet or television. It is essential we protect our interests and assets from potential adversaries who seek to cause major disruption and do us harm.</p> <p>Britain is a world leader in the space industry and our defence scientists and military personnel have played a central role in the development of the EU&rsquo;s Galileo satellite programme alongside British companies, so it is important we also review our contribution and how we plan for alternative systems in this crucial area."</p> <p>As part of the EU&rsquo;s Galileo programme, UK companies have led the way in developing innovative satellite technology. The UK has contributed &euro;1.4bn (&pound;1.2bn) in funding to the programme and provided vital ground infrastructure in the Falklands and the Ascension Islands. Participation in Galileo with the appropriate level of access and involvement remains the MOD's preferred option, however the department is working on alternative options, and as part of this will work with the UK Space Agency to explore opportunities for UK companies.</p> <p>techUK will seek to engage with the MOD on the the development of the new strategy once it is published in the summer, so that its content reflects the views and suggestions of our members.</p> <p>For more information on the official announcement of the UK Defence Space Strategy, as well as comments from the Minister for Defence Procurement and the Chief of the Air Staff on the launch, <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-poised-for-take-off-on-ambitious-defence-space-strategy-with-personnel-boost">please click here</a>.</p>{bio}julian.mcgougan@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}fred.sugden@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>With an increasing amount of the UK&rsquo;s military systems now dependent on space technology, the MOD has today announced that RAF Air Command has assumed responsibility for command and control of UK military space operations to defend the UK&rsquo;s interests in space. The Defence Secretary has also confirmed his intention to boost the 500 personnel currently working in the UK defence space sector by a fifth over the next five years, taking the total to over 600. The new Defence Space Strategy, expected in the summer, will set out plans to protect UK operations against emerging space-based threats such as jamming of civilian satellites used for broadcasters and satellite navigation to support military capabilities.</p> <p>Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson said:</p> <p>"We must make sure we are primed and ready to deter and counter the intensifying threats to our everyday life that are emerging in space. That&rsquo;s why today I&rsquo;m announcing the RAF is taking the lead in this area and why we plan to increase the number of personnel covering space.</p> <p>Satellite technology is not just a crucial tool for our Armed Forces but vital to our way of life, whether that be access to our mobile phones, the internet or television. It is essential we protect our interests and assets from potential adversaries who seek to cause major disruption and do us harm.</p> <p>Britain is a world leader in the space industry and our defence scientists and military personnel have played a central role in the development of the EU&rsquo;s Galileo satellite programme alongside British companies, so it is important we also review our contribution and how we plan for alternative systems in this crucial area."</p> <p>As part of the EU&rsquo;s Galileo programme, UK companies have led the way in developing innovative satellite technology. The UK has contributed &euro;1.4bn (&pound;1.2bn) in funding to the programme and provided vital ground infrastructure in the Falklands and the Ascension Islands. Participation in Galileo with the appropriate level of access and involvement remains the MOD's preferred option, however the department is working on alternative options, and as part of this will work with the UK Space Agency to explore opportunities for UK companies.</p> <p>techUK will seek to engage with the MOD on the the development of the new strategy once it is published in the summer, so that its content reflects the views and suggestions of our members.</p> <p>For more information on the official announcement of the UK Defence Space Strategy, as well as comments from the Minister for Defence Procurement and the Chief of the Air Staff on the launch, <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-poised-for-take-off-on-ambitious-defence-space-strategy-with-personnel-boost">please click here</a>.</p>{bio}julian.mcgougan@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}fred.sugden@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Balancing GDPR and the need for connected healthcare 2018-05-21T16:00:00+01:00 2018-05-21T16:00:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13147-balancing-gdpr-and-the-need-for-connected-healthcare CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Cerner%20AI%20Week%20image.jpg" style="float:left; height:300px; margin:5px; width:400px">General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is upon us &ndash; the change in the law that applies to all companies processing data of EU citizens, across all sectors and industries.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As a citizen, I&rsquo;ve welcomed the law with enthusiastic applause as it means I get more control over my own data and more transparency in the way it is processed. This regulation gives me, as an individual, &lsquo;digital rights&rsquo; - very timely given recent data sharing concerns and scandals.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Whilst that is my personal view, as&nbsp;a professional&nbsp;working for a global health and care technology company like Cerner, my thoughts are more nuanced. Staying abreast of data protection regulations with evolving policy is a constant balance between our mission to improve health and care through interoperable and intelligent systems, and a commitment to protect patient data and a person&rsquo;s right to privacy. The journey to data protection compliance has been challenging in many ways, often with a lack of clarity about how to interpret and apply the regulation&rsquo;s direction.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <h4>Sharing information to drive change&nbsp;</h4> <p>Patients&nbsp;that&nbsp;want a connected care experience&nbsp;expect&nbsp;their full care team to have access to the right information at the right time.&nbsp;It is certain that effective sharing of data enables better care delivery, enhanced decision making, improved outcomes and a positive patient experience &ndash; all&nbsp;benefits that the majority of citizens would appreciate. We know that&nbsp;a&nbsp;single source of truth is essential to all of these things, and intelligently engaging the population can truly manage citizens&rsquo; health.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Organisations are now appreciating the shared need to deliver more proactive and preventative care using innovative technology and intelligence. However, no innovation is without its challenges, and data is a key component of this one. Patient, medical, health and care data&nbsp;must&nbsp;be shared and used&nbsp;safely, properly, and confidentially. With new and evolving&nbsp;technology, ever more&nbsp;sophisticated cyber threats, and widely variable public perception, GDPR, data sharing and consent&nbsp;are&nbsp;arguably the greatest&nbsp;challenges&nbsp;for organisations wishing to innovate, integrate health and care, and truly manage the wellbeing of their population in this digital age.&nbsp;</p> <p>Further challenges arise when the data sharing plays a wider role than just direct patient care. With intelligence, it can improve service planning, predict outcomes and reduce risk, inform finances and support research. When applicable, there must be consideration given to de-identifying and anonymising data to protect the citizens&rsquo; right to privacy &ndash; and this needs clarity over what activities constitute &lsquo;direct care&rsquo; and what doesn&rsquo;t, and when explicit consent is required.&nbsp;</p> <h4>All about communication&nbsp;</h4> <p>An inherent fear remains over privacy, data protection and potentially misuse, a fear that risks stifling innovation, and hindering intelligent population health management.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Through GDPR, data controllers have an opportunity to re-engage with the public,&nbsp;and be open and transparent about their processes and purpose. We have found that transparency is key. Informing the public of the purpose, intentions and benefits can make the difference, while opting&nbsp;out when the data use purpose changes for secondary&nbsp;reasons other than direct care&nbsp;needs rapid clarification for both professionals&nbsp;and the public.&nbsp;</p> <h4>Using data, the right way&nbsp;</h4> <p>GDPR has far-reaching implications, and no one has all of the answers yet. However, all organisations must work in partnership with each other and their communities&nbsp;to enable data to be&nbsp;stored and transferred securely across the health and care system regardless of its location. Data should be visible to all approved persons aligned with an&nbsp;intended use. Data should be interpreted by the right professionals in the right moment and ultimately, patient data belongs to the citizen.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>These are the principles that Cerner commits to while working with our clients on population health management. We work in partnerships driven by mutual trust, transparency and commitment to citizens&rsquo; best interest &ndash; and helping the&nbsp;health and&nbsp;social&nbsp;care system be the best it can be.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Cerner%20AI%20Week%20image.jpg" style="float:left; height:300px; margin:5px; width:400px">General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is upon us &ndash; the change in the law that applies to all companies processing data of EU citizens, across all sectors and industries.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As a citizen, I&rsquo;ve welcomed the law with enthusiastic applause as it means I get more control over my own data and more transparency in the way it is processed. This regulation gives me, as an individual, &lsquo;digital rights&rsquo; - very timely given recent data sharing concerns and scandals.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Whilst that is my personal view, as&nbsp;a professional&nbsp;working for a global health and care technology company like Cerner, my thoughts are more nuanced. Staying abreast of data protection regulations with evolving policy is a constant balance between our mission to improve health and care through interoperable and intelligent systems, and a commitment to protect patient data and a person&rsquo;s right to privacy. The journey to data protection compliance has been challenging in many ways, often with a lack of clarity about how to interpret and apply the regulation&rsquo;s direction.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <h4>Sharing information to drive change&nbsp;</h4> <p>Patients&nbsp;that&nbsp;want a connected care experience&nbsp;expect&nbsp;their full care team to have access to the right information at the right time.&nbsp;It is certain that effective sharing of data enables better care delivery, enhanced decision making, improved outcomes and a positive patient experience &ndash; all&nbsp;benefits that the majority of citizens would appreciate. We know that&nbsp;a&nbsp;single source of truth is essential to all of these things, and intelligently engaging the population can truly manage citizens&rsquo; health.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Organisations are now appreciating the shared need to deliver more proactive and preventative care using innovative technology and intelligence. However, no innovation is without its challenges, and data is a key component of this one. Patient, medical, health and care data&nbsp;must&nbsp;be shared and used&nbsp;safely, properly, and confidentially. With new and evolving&nbsp;technology, ever more&nbsp;sophisticated cyber threats, and widely variable public perception, GDPR, data sharing and consent&nbsp;are&nbsp;arguably the greatest&nbsp;challenges&nbsp;for organisations wishing to innovate, integrate health and care, and truly manage the wellbeing of their population in this digital age.&nbsp;</p> <p>Further challenges arise when the data sharing plays a wider role than just direct patient care. With intelligence, it can improve service planning, predict outcomes and reduce risk, inform finances and support research. When applicable, there must be consideration given to de-identifying and anonymising data to protect the citizens&rsquo; right to privacy &ndash; and this needs clarity over what activities constitute &lsquo;direct care&rsquo; and what doesn&rsquo;t, and when explicit consent is required.&nbsp;</p> <h4>All about communication&nbsp;</h4> <p>An inherent fear remains over privacy, data protection and potentially misuse, a fear that risks stifling innovation, and hindering intelligent population health management.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Through GDPR, data controllers have an opportunity to re-engage with the public,&nbsp;and be open and transparent about their processes and purpose. We have found that transparency is key. Informing the public of the purpose, intentions and benefits can make the difference, while opting&nbsp;out when the data use purpose changes for secondary&nbsp;reasons other than direct care&nbsp;needs rapid clarification for both professionals&nbsp;and the public.&nbsp;</p> <h4>Using data, the right way&nbsp;</h4> <p>GDPR has far-reaching implications, and no one has all of the answers yet. However, all organisations must work in partnership with each other and their communities&nbsp;to enable data to be&nbsp;stored and transferred securely across the health and care system regardless of its location. Data should be visible to all approved persons aligned with an&nbsp;intended use. Data should be interpreted by the right professionals in the right moment and ultimately, patient data belongs to the citizen.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>These are the principles that Cerner commits to while working with our clients on population health management. We work in partnerships driven by mutual trust, transparency and commitment to citizens&rsquo; best interest &ndash; and helping the&nbsp;health and&nbsp;social&nbsp;care system be the best it can be.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a><span style="color:#0000FF">&nbsp;</span></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> techUK Calls on Gov for a Definitive Plan for Digital Radio Switchover 2018-05-21T12:24:46+01:00 2018-05-21T12:24:46+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/13146-techuk-calls-on-gov-for-a-definitive-plan-for-digital-radio-switchover CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><strong>techUK calls on Government for a definitive plan for digital radio switchover and to finish the job it started</strong></p> <ul><li>Majority of UK Radio listening (50.9%) is now via a digital platform (Source: RAJAR, May 2018)</li> <li>62.8% of the UK population now listen to radio via a digital platform (Source: RAJAR)</li> <li>Industry has met the Government criteria on digItal coverage and listening, triggering a switchover review</li> <li>Over 35 million DAB digital receivers have been sold in the UK to date (GFK, SMMT/CAP).</li> <li>techUK calls on Government and Broadcasters to agree a clear plan and timeline for a fully digital radio future</li> <li>Radio listeners are urged to buy digitally-enabled devices to ensure they can receive the full breadth of stations and continue to receive their favourite stations after switchover</li> </ul><p>Digital Radio has come a long way since its UK launch in 1995. The industry has collectively invested heavily in developing content, devices and terrestrial (DAB) and IP distribution networks that now reach over 97% of UK homes for national BBC stations, over 90% of homes for local DAB coverage and over 75% of the UK road network (Ofcom). In the UK, more than 35 million digital radios have been sold and more than 90% of new cars now come with DAB.</p> <p>Digital Radio offers listeners more choice. DAB Digital radio offers double the number of stations compared to FM/AM, with more than 250 broadcasting across the UK. Listeners can also benefit from better sound quality and on-screen/ display information.</p> <p>Digital Radio has always been positioned as the future of radio, a replacement to the aging analogue network. The additional costs (in part borne by the BBC licence fee payer) of dual analogue/ digital transmissions were planned to be removed once a full transiition to digital only distribution could be achieved.</p> <p>In a letter to ministers Paul Hide, Director of Market Engagment and Membership, emphasised that &ldquo;Now is the time to put plans in place to finish the job we have started. A clear decision, date and timetable needs to be put in place to allow the listener and industry to prepare for an eventual switchover. A failure to follow through and finish the job started will damage the credibility and attractiveness of radio and risks damaging the UK radio industry. Industry needs certainty to plan for a digital future and listerners need clarity to encourage them to purchase devices that will continue to work in a digital only world.&rdquo;</p>{bio}paul.hide@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><strong>techUK calls on Government for a definitive plan for digital radio switchover and to finish the job it started</strong></p> <ul><li>Majority of UK Radio listening (50.9%) is now via a digital platform (Source: RAJAR, May 2018)</li> <li>62.8% of the UK population now listen to radio via a digital platform (Source: RAJAR)</li> <li>Industry has met the Government criteria on digItal coverage and listening, triggering a switchover review</li> <li>Over 35 million DAB digital receivers have been sold in the UK to date (GFK, SMMT/CAP).</li> <li>techUK calls on Government and Broadcasters to agree a clear plan and timeline for a fully digital radio future</li> <li>Radio listeners are urged to buy digitally-enabled devices to ensure they can receive the full breadth of stations and continue to receive their favourite stations after switchover</li> </ul><p>Digital Radio has come a long way since its UK launch in 1995. The industry has collectively invested heavily in developing content, devices and terrestrial (DAB) and IP distribution networks that now reach over 97% of UK homes for national BBC stations, over 90% of homes for local DAB coverage and over 75% of the UK road network (Ofcom). In the UK, more than 35 million digital radios have been sold and more than 90% of new cars now come with DAB.</p> <p>Digital Radio offers listeners more choice. DAB Digital radio offers double the number of stations compared to FM/AM, with more than 250 broadcasting across the UK. Listeners can also benefit from better sound quality and on-screen/ display information.</p> <p>Digital Radio has always been positioned as the future of radio, a replacement to the aging analogue network. The additional costs (in part borne by the BBC licence fee payer) of dual analogue/ digital transmissions were planned to be removed once a full transiition to digital only distribution could be achieved.</p> <p>In a letter to ministers Paul Hide, Director of Market Engagment and Membership, emphasised that &ldquo;Now is the time to put plans in place to finish the job we have started. A clear decision, date and timetable needs to be put in place to allow the listener and industry to prepare for an eventual switchover. A failure to follow through and finish the job started will damage the credibility and attractiveness of radio and risks damaging the UK radio industry. Industry needs certainty to plan for a digital future and listerners need clarity to encourage them to purchase devices that will continue to work in a digital only world.&rdquo;</p>{bio}paul.hide@techuk.org{/bio}</div> techUK comment on progress on the Internet Safety Strategy 2018-05-21T11:24:37+01:00 2018-05-21T11:24:37+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13145-techuk-comment-on-progress-on-the-internet-safety-strategy CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>&ldquo;We welcome the Government&rsquo;s recognition that the leading social media companies are already taking steps to improve their platforms &ndash; making them safer and more pleasant places to be. This is a clear acknowledgement that the sector fully shares the commitment to make the UK the safest place to be online.</p> <p>Where we can move quickly with confidence on the effectiveness of the outcome we should do. But we must avoid &ldquo;quick fixes&rdquo; that are unworkable and could end up being counter-productive. We need to get to a position where government and tech firms are 100% aligned on what needs to be done so that we can get on and implement solutions that we can all have confidence will work.</p> <p>There is still a lot of work to be done between now and publication of a White Paper and as a sector we want to keep building on the serious and constructive engagement that has happened to date.&rdquo;</p>{bio}antony.walker@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>&ldquo;We welcome the Government&rsquo;s recognition that the leading social media companies are already taking steps to improve their platforms &ndash; making them safer and more pleasant places to be. This is a clear acknowledgement that the sector fully shares the commitment to make the UK the safest place to be online.</p> <p>Where we can move quickly with confidence on the effectiveness of the outcome we should do. But we must avoid &ldquo;quick fixes&rdquo; that are unworkable and could end up being counter-productive. We need to get to a position where government and tech firms are 100% aligned on what needs to be done so that we can get on and implement solutions that we can all have confidence will work.</p> <p>There is still a lot of work to be done between now and publication of a White Paper and as a sector we want to keep building on the serious and constructive engagement that has happened to date.&rdquo;</p>{bio}antony.walker@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Policing, Justice & the Data Protection Bill: The third Brontë sister… 2018-05-21T14:30:00+01:00 2018-05-21T14:30:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13144-policing-justice-the-data-protection-bill-the-third-bronte-sister CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Balance,%20Justice,%20Libra,%20Scales.jpg" style="float:right; height:307px; margin:5px; width:391px">May 2018 is a big month for data protection. As&nbsp;we all know, on the 25th&nbsp;the&nbsp;General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into effect in the UK and across Europe, the most significant change in data protection law for a generation. And earlier this month the&nbsp;NIS Directive&nbsp;to boost the security of networks and information systems was brought in with much fanfare.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>By now GDPR and the NIS Directive are as familiar to us all as Jane Eyre&nbsp;and&nbsp;Wuthering Heights. But there is a third strand to data protection being introduced this month, which, like&nbsp;the works of&nbsp;Anne&nbsp;Bront&euml;, is much less talked about but still significant:&nbsp;The&nbsp;Law Enforcement Directive.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Law Enforcement Directive is the sister legislation to GDPR&nbsp;and governs the processing and handling of personal data for law enforcement purposes. EU member states had until 6th&nbsp;May 2018 to implement the Directive, but because the UK is bringing it in together with GDPR via the Data Protection Bill, we missed that deadline.&nbsp;Since we will be implementing it not long after the deadline the Government will probably earn only a mild reprimand from Brussels.&nbsp;</p> <p>Due to the nature of their work, UK police forces&nbsp;must&nbsp;handle a lot of sensitive data. And&nbsp;so,&nbsp;data protection is critical issue for police and law enforcement agencies. Last month&nbsp;Humberside Police&nbsp;were&nbsp;fined &pound;130,000 for losing three disks&nbsp;and some paperwork containing highly sensitive information about a rape victim (including an interview with, name and date of birth of the victim). The data was&nbsp;unencrypted, and due to be posted to a neighbouring force, but never arrived. This incident bears remarkable similarity to&nbsp;a case last year&nbsp;where the ICO fined&nbsp;Greater Manchester Police&nbsp;&pound;150,000 for losing&nbsp;three DVDs containing footage of interviews with victims of violent or sexual crimes.&nbsp;</p> <p>And in 2016&nbsp;one in 20 data protection complaints&nbsp;to the ICO from the public&nbsp;concerned policing and criminal records. So clearly there is room for improvement in how some forces&nbsp;handle data.&nbsp;And while the LE Directive&nbsp;governs operational data used for policing purposes, for all other data (payroll, HR, finance etc) the police will need to comply with GDPR.&nbsp;</p> <p>Data sharing and analysis is&nbsp;critical for the police to do their jobs effectively. Done well, it can allow officers to spend more time out in their communities, identify interventions early to keep people safe, and inform how to deploy resources to maximise effect. This is to be encouraged.&nbsp;So,&nbsp;the task for policing is to comply with the new regulations&nbsp;without losing any enthusiasm for data sharing and collaboration.&nbsp;</p> <p>Tech companies have been working&nbsp;hard&nbsp;with police forces to&nbsp;make sure they have&nbsp;the tools they need to do the job while protecting them from non-compliance&nbsp;with the incoming regulations.&nbsp;But&nbsp;compliance is not just a matter of technology,&nbsp;it is also&nbsp;one of people and processes.&nbsp;</p> <p>There is a real opportunity here for these regulations to be seen not simply as a compliance issue, but as a chance to share and manage data more effectively across the entire justice system.&nbsp;And the key to this is trust. Maintaining&nbsp;public&nbsp;trust is vitally important. If police forces can get on top of new data protection regulations, they will be able to&nbsp;preserve and increase public trust, all the while harnessing data to improve operational outcomes &ndash; surely a prize worth working hard to achieve.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a></p>{bio}henry.rex@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Balance,%20Justice,%20Libra,%20Scales.jpg" style="float:right; height:307px; margin:5px; width:391px">May 2018 is a big month for data protection. As&nbsp;we all know, on the 25th&nbsp;the&nbsp;General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into effect in the UK and across Europe, the most significant change in data protection law for a generation. And earlier this month the&nbsp;NIS Directive&nbsp;to boost the security of networks and information systems was brought in with much fanfare.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>By now GDPR and the NIS Directive are as familiar to us all as Jane Eyre&nbsp;and&nbsp;Wuthering Heights. But there is a third strand to data protection being introduced this month, which, like&nbsp;the works of&nbsp;Anne&nbsp;Bront&euml;, is much less talked about but still significant:&nbsp;The&nbsp;Law Enforcement Directive.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Law Enforcement Directive is the sister legislation to GDPR&nbsp;and governs the processing and handling of personal data for law enforcement purposes. EU member states had until 6th&nbsp;May 2018 to implement the Directive, but because the UK is bringing it in together with GDPR via the Data Protection Bill, we missed that deadline.&nbsp;Since we will be implementing it not long after the deadline the Government will probably earn only a mild reprimand from Brussels.&nbsp;</p> <p>Due to the nature of their work, UK police forces&nbsp;must&nbsp;handle a lot of sensitive data. And&nbsp;so,&nbsp;data protection is critical issue for police and law enforcement agencies. Last month&nbsp;Humberside Police&nbsp;were&nbsp;fined &pound;130,000 for losing three disks&nbsp;and some paperwork containing highly sensitive information about a rape victim (including an interview with, name and date of birth of the victim). The data was&nbsp;unencrypted, and due to be posted to a neighbouring force, but never arrived. This incident bears remarkable similarity to&nbsp;a case last year&nbsp;where the ICO fined&nbsp;Greater Manchester Police&nbsp;&pound;150,000 for losing&nbsp;three DVDs containing footage of interviews with victims of violent or sexual crimes.&nbsp;</p> <p>And in 2016&nbsp;one in 20 data protection complaints&nbsp;to the ICO from the public&nbsp;concerned policing and criminal records. So clearly there is room for improvement in how some forces&nbsp;handle data.&nbsp;And while the LE Directive&nbsp;governs operational data used for policing purposes, for all other data (payroll, HR, finance etc) the police will need to comply with GDPR.&nbsp;</p> <p>Data sharing and analysis is&nbsp;critical for the police to do their jobs effectively. Done well, it can allow officers to spend more time out in their communities, identify interventions early to keep people safe, and inform how to deploy resources to maximise effect. This is to be encouraged.&nbsp;So,&nbsp;the task for policing is to comply with the new regulations&nbsp;without losing any enthusiasm for data sharing and collaboration.&nbsp;</p> <p>Tech companies have been working&nbsp;hard&nbsp;with police forces to&nbsp;make sure they have&nbsp;the tools they need to do the job while protecting them from non-compliance&nbsp;with the incoming regulations.&nbsp;But&nbsp;compliance is not just a matter of technology,&nbsp;it is also&nbsp;one of people and processes.&nbsp;</p> <p>There is a real opportunity here for these regulations to be seen not simply as a compliance issue, but as a chance to share and manage data more effectively across the entire justice system.&nbsp;And the key to this is trust. Maintaining&nbsp;public&nbsp;trust is vitally important. If police forces can get on top of new data protection regulations, they will be able to&nbsp;preserve and increase public trust, all the while harnessing data to improve operational outcomes &ndash; surely a prize worth working hard to achieve.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a></p>{bio}henry.rex@techuk.org{/bio}{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> LOGNET 18-1: Modernising Defence Logistics 2018-05-21T11:19:44+01:00 2018-05-21T11:19:44+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/events/briefing/item/13143-lognet-18-1-modernising-defence-logistics CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Building on previous LOGNET events and following the National Security Capability Review (NSCR) the next LOGNET event seeks to compliment the activity ongoing within the Modernising Defence Programme (MDP). Defence Logistics sees the opportunity to use LOGNET to develop thinking and activity influencing outcomes and future work as the department develops its next iteration of strategic direction.</p> <h2 id="aim-of-lognet-18-1">Aim of LOGNET 18-1</h2> <p>The aim of LOGNET 18-1 is to update the network on the topics which are being investigated for development and to discuss in more detail some of the topics. It is then to enable the opportunity for industrial partners to consider the challenges faced, giving the opportunity for proposals to be brought back to Defence Logistics personnel within the linked 18-2 event.</p> <h2 id="lognet-18-1-content">LOGNET 18-1 content</h2> <p>The agenda for LOGNET 18-1: &lsquo;Evolving Defence Logistics&rsquo; on 7 and 8 June 2018 will provide an update on Defence logistics challenges and opportunities. It will also progress from previous LOGNET work which has brought Defence Logistic focus to these areas:</p> <ul><li>Rapid information infrastructure deployment</li> <li>Human/Computer Interface</li> <li>Reducing dependency demand, operational cost and logistics footprint on deployments</li> <li>Condition Based Maintenance/Predictive Maintenance &amp; Monitoring Systems</li> <li>Space (Saving) Food Concept focussing on less transport mass, full nourishment</li> <li>Smarter Power Distribution</li> <li>Real-time monitoring, reporting and management of the condition of precious stock</li> <li>Battlefield Water Generation</li> <li>Battlefield Manufacturing (Additive Manufacturing)</li> <li>Automation, Robots, Drones and Remote Controlled (Hardware)</li> <li>Artificial Intelligence for logistics</li> <li>Quicker/Smart Contract Writing (Software)</li> <li>Mobile/Agile Warehousing</li> <li>Augmented Reality for training and surrogate expert repairs</li> <li>Codification and item data</li> </ul><p>Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Parking at the hotel is free.</p> <p>If your organisation is connected to the logistics and engineering support sector and you would like to engage with the Defence Logistics community, please feel welcome to sign up&nbsp;<a href="http://www.lognet18-1.eventbrite.com/" rel="external">here</a></p> <p>Please sign up&nbsp;<a href="http://www.lognet18-1.eventbrite.com/" rel="external">here</a>.</p> <p>An industry response event (LOGNET 18-2) is planned for 9 - 10 October 2018 where the industry will have the opportunity to showcase its solutions.</p></div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Building on previous LOGNET events and following the National Security Capability Review (NSCR) the next LOGNET event seeks to compliment the activity ongoing within the Modernising Defence Programme (MDP). Defence Logistics sees the opportunity to use LOGNET to develop thinking and activity influencing outcomes and future work as the department develops its next iteration of strategic direction.</p> <h2 id="aim-of-lognet-18-1">Aim of LOGNET 18-1</h2> <p>The aim of LOGNET 18-1 is to update the network on the topics which are being investigated for development and to discuss in more detail some of the topics. It is then to enable the opportunity for industrial partners to consider the challenges faced, giving the opportunity for proposals to be brought back to Defence Logistics personnel within the linked 18-2 event.</p> <h2 id="lognet-18-1-content">LOGNET 18-1 content</h2> <p>The agenda for LOGNET 18-1: &lsquo;Evolving Defence Logistics&rsquo; on 7 and 8 June 2018 will provide an update on Defence logistics challenges and opportunities. It will also progress from previous LOGNET work which has brought Defence Logistic focus to these areas:</p> <ul><li>Rapid information infrastructure deployment</li> <li>Human/Computer Interface</li> <li>Reducing dependency demand, operational cost and logistics footprint on deployments</li> <li>Condition Based Maintenance/Predictive Maintenance &amp; Monitoring Systems</li> <li>Space (Saving) Food Concept focussing on less transport mass, full nourishment</li> <li>Smarter Power Distribution</li> <li>Real-time monitoring, reporting and management of the condition of precious stock</li> <li>Battlefield Water Generation</li> <li>Battlefield Manufacturing (Additive Manufacturing)</li> <li>Automation, Robots, Drones and Remote Controlled (Hardware)</li> <li>Artificial Intelligence for logistics</li> <li>Quicker/Smart Contract Writing (Software)</li> <li>Mobile/Agile Warehousing</li> <li>Augmented Reality for training and surrogate expert repairs</li> <li>Codification and item data</li> </ul><p>Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Parking at the hotel is free.</p> <p>If your organisation is connected to the logistics and engineering support sector and you would like to engage with the Defence Logistics community, please feel welcome to sign up&nbsp;<a href="http://www.lognet18-1.eventbrite.com/" rel="external">here</a></p> <p>Please sign up&nbsp;<a href="http://www.lognet18-1.eventbrite.com/" rel="external">here</a>.</p> <p>An industry response event (LOGNET 18-2) is planned for 9 - 10 October 2018 where the industry will have the opportunity to showcase its solutions.</p></div> GDPR: Do people care? 2018-05-21T13:00:00+01:00 2018-05-21T13:00:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13141-gdpr-do-people-care CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/RN%202.2%20copy.jpg" style="float:left; height:284px; margin:5px; width:400px">Thanks to a number of surveys in recent months, we are gaining a deeper understanding of people&rsquo;s attitudes to data: its protection and&nbsp;people&rsquo;s&nbsp;rights to privacy and control, their levels of trust in organisations that hold their data, and what they want those companies to do to improve their understanding and trust. For example,&nbsp;<a href="http://attitudes.doteveryone.org.uk/%22%20%5Ct%20%22_blank"><span style="color:#0000FF">Doteveryone</span>&nbsp;</a>found that&nbsp;95% of people say it&rsquo;s important to know their data is secure&nbsp;and&nbsp;94% say it&rsquo;s important to know how their data is used.&nbsp;</p> <p>But, on the subject of what the new GDPR rights mean for individuals, there has been little testing of attitudes and a notable gap in public engagement by the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ico.org.uk"><span style="color:#0000FF">Information Commissioner&rsquo;s Office (ICO)</span></a>.&nbsp;This is starting to change, with&nbsp;the&nbsp;imminent launch of the&nbsp;&ldquo;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/resources-and-support/your-data-matters/"><span style="color:#0000FF">Your Data Matters</span></a>&rdquo;&nbsp;campaign.&nbsp;Yet this period of radio silence has been at a time when&nbsp;public awareness of data protection, privacy and ownership has been heightened by recent events involving Facebook and Cambridge Analytica.&#8239;&nbsp;</p> <p>So that&rsquo;s where&nbsp;the&nbsp;Corsham Institute (Ci)&nbsp;<a href="https://www.corshaminstitute.org/ydyr/"><span style="color:#0000FF">Your Data, Your Rights&nbsp;project</span></a> comes in. You can read more about our project and the findings from our&nbsp;survey&nbsp;<a href="https://www.corshaminstitute.org/corsham-institute-1/2018/5/10/personal-data-how-much-do-people-know-or-care"><span style="color:#0000FF">here</span></a>, and, as&nbsp;the clock ticks down to GDPR,&nbsp;it&rsquo;s worth&nbsp;reflecting on a couple of&nbsp;the key insights.&nbsp;We&nbsp;carried out our&nbsp;survey shortly after the news about Cambridge Analytica and Facebook broke and asked our respondents a few questions about its impact on their attitudes: 80% said that&nbsp;these&nbsp;events had made them think more about their data and what they share online;&nbsp;and 40% said it had changed the way they feel about organisations having access to their data &lsquo;a lot&rsquo;.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Yet,&nbsp;when asked questions about what counts as personal data and how it is used, there was a striking lack of certainty: less than half of our respondents picked the accepted&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/key-definitions/"><span style="color:#0000FF">ICO definition of personal data</span></a>, and only 18% said they knew a lot about the collection of their data. But, crucially, the collection of this data is important to Corsham residents: 60% of respondents said they care a lot about what organisations might use their data for (rising to&nbsp;a staggering 87% among over-65s), while only 3% said they didn&rsquo;t care at all and 4% said they hadn&rsquo;t thought about it before.&#8239;&nbsp;</p> <p>GDPR gives people a means by which to act on these concerns: to find out what data is held on them, to rectify changes if it is wrong and to move it elsewhere if they wish. And it is also a huge opportunity for businesses to demonstrate that they understand the importance of this to individuals and to build a&nbsp;trusted, transparent&nbsp;relationship with their customers.&#8239;&nbsp;</p> <p>So, in the next stage of our project, we will be working directly with groups in the Corsham community to delve more deeply into the survey findings and to co-produce the information they need to help them better understand what their data is used for, their new rights, and how and when they can use them. Ci will also use the insight and evidence gathered via our&nbsp;work with the Corsham community&nbsp;to feed into our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.corshaminstitute.org/digital-trust/"><span style="color:#0000FF">Digital Trust</span></a>&nbsp;project, where we are working with partners to influence a regional and national debate, involving policymakers, businesses and other influencers. Get in touch via&nbsp;<a href="mailto:info@corshaminstitute.org"><span style="color:#0000FF">info@corshaminstitute.org</span></a>&nbsp;to find out more.&nbsp;</p> <p><em>A <a href="http://www.connectedobservatory.net"><span style="color:#0000FF">longer version of this article</span></a> appeared on&nbsp;the Corsham Institute and RAND Europe&nbsp;Observatory for a Connected Society, the first mobile and web platform bringing together all the latest research, insight and comment on digital policy and tech developments.&nbsp;</em></p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/RN%202.2%20copy.jpg" style="float:left; height:284px; margin:5px; width:400px">Thanks to a number of surveys in recent months, we are gaining a deeper understanding of people&rsquo;s attitudes to data: its protection and&nbsp;people&rsquo;s&nbsp;rights to privacy and control, their levels of trust in organisations that hold their data, and what they want those companies to do to improve their understanding and trust. For example,&nbsp;<a href="http://attitudes.doteveryone.org.uk/%22%20%5Ct%20%22_blank"><span style="color:#0000FF">Doteveryone</span>&nbsp;</a>found that&nbsp;95% of people say it&rsquo;s important to know their data is secure&nbsp;and&nbsp;94% say it&rsquo;s important to know how their data is used.&nbsp;</p> <p>But, on the subject of what the new GDPR rights mean for individuals, there has been little testing of attitudes and a notable gap in public engagement by the&nbsp;<a href="http://www.ico.org.uk"><span style="color:#0000FF">Information Commissioner&rsquo;s Office (ICO)</span></a>.&nbsp;This is starting to change, with&nbsp;the&nbsp;imminent launch of the&nbsp;&ldquo;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/resources-and-support/your-data-matters/"><span style="color:#0000FF">Your Data Matters</span></a>&rdquo;&nbsp;campaign.&nbsp;Yet this period of radio silence has been at a time when&nbsp;public awareness of data protection, privacy and ownership has been heightened by recent events involving Facebook and Cambridge Analytica.&#8239;&nbsp;</p> <p>So that&rsquo;s where&nbsp;the&nbsp;Corsham Institute (Ci)&nbsp;<a href="https://www.corshaminstitute.org/ydyr/"><span style="color:#0000FF">Your Data, Your Rights&nbsp;project</span></a> comes in. You can read more about our project and the findings from our&nbsp;survey&nbsp;<a href="https://www.corshaminstitute.org/corsham-institute-1/2018/5/10/personal-data-how-much-do-people-know-or-care"><span style="color:#0000FF">here</span></a>, and, as&nbsp;the clock ticks down to GDPR,&nbsp;it&rsquo;s worth&nbsp;reflecting on a couple of&nbsp;the key insights.&nbsp;We&nbsp;carried out our&nbsp;survey shortly after the news about Cambridge Analytica and Facebook broke and asked our respondents a few questions about its impact on their attitudes: 80% said that&nbsp;these&nbsp;events had made them think more about their data and what they share online;&nbsp;and 40% said it had changed the way they feel about organisations having access to their data &lsquo;a lot&rsquo;.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Yet,&nbsp;when asked questions about what counts as personal data and how it is used, there was a striking lack of certainty: less than half of our respondents picked the accepted&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/key-definitions/"><span style="color:#0000FF">ICO definition of personal data</span></a>, and only 18% said they knew a lot about the collection of their data. But, crucially, the collection of this data is important to Corsham residents: 60% of respondents said they care a lot about what organisations might use their data for (rising to&nbsp;a staggering 87% among over-65s), while only 3% said they didn&rsquo;t care at all and 4% said they hadn&rsquo;t thought about it before.&#8239;&nbsp;</p> <p>GDPR gives people a means by which to act on these concerns: to find out what data is held on them, to rectify changes if it is wrong and to move it elsewhere if they wish. And it is also a huge opportunity for businesses to demonstrate that they understand the importance of this to individuals and to build a&nbsp;trusted, transparent&nbsp;relationship with their customers.&#8239;&nbsp;</p> <p>So, in the next stage of our project, we will be working directly with groups in the Corsham community to delve more deeply into the survey findings and to co-produce the information they need to help them better understand what their data is used for, their new rights, and how and when they can use them. Ci will also use the insight and evidence gathered via our&nbsp;work with the Corsham community&nbsp;to feed into our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.corshaminstitute.org/digital-trust/"><span style="color:#0000FF">Digital Trust</span></a>&nbsp;project, where we are working with partners to influence a regional and national debate, involving policymakers, businesses and other influencers. Get in touch via&nbsp;<a href="mailto:info@corshaminstitute.org"><span style="color:#0000FF">info@corshaminstitute.org</span></a>&nbsp;to find out more.&nbsp;</p> <p><em>A <a href="http://www.connectedobservatory.net"><span style="color:#0000FF">longer version of this article</span></a> appeared on&nbsp;the Corsham Institute and RAND Europe&nbsp;Observatory for a Connected Society, the first mobile and web platform bringing together all the latest research, insight and comment on digital policy and tech developments.&nbsp;</em></p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> NCSC and ICO publish cyber security guidance on GDPR 2018-05-18T15:45:21+01:00 2018-05-18T15:45:21+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/13138-ncsc-and-ico-publish-cyber-security-guidance-on-gdpr CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><strong>What does the GDPR mean for cyber security?</strong></p> <p>The GDPR requires that personal data must be processed securely using appropriate technical and organisational measures.&nbsp;The Regulation does not mandate a specific set of cyber security measures but rather expects you to take &lsquo;appropriate&rsquo; action. In other words you need to&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/risk-management-collection" rel="nofollow">manage risk</a>. What is appropriate for you will depend upon your circumstances as well as the data you are processing and therefore the risks posed, however there is an expectation&nbsp;you have minimal, established security measures in place. The security measures must be designed into your systems at the outset (referred to as Privacy by Design) and maintained effective throughout the life of your system.</p> <p>The NCSC have worked with the ICO to develop a set of&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/gdpr-security-outcomes" rel="nofollow">GDPR Security Outcomes</a>. This guidance provides an overview of what the GDPR says about security and describes a set of security related outcomes that all organisations processing personal data should seek to achieve. The approach is based on four top level aims:</p> <ul><li>manage security risk</li> <li>protect personal data against cyber attack</li> <li>detect security events, and</li> <li>minimise the impact</li> </ul><p>A good starting point for advice on implementing security measures for the GDPR is existing good cyber security guidance. Some good sources of information include our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/10-steps-cyber-security" rel="nofollow">10 Steps to Cyber Security</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/smallbusiness" rel="nofollow">Small Business Guide</a>&nbsp;or the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.cyberessentials.ncsc.gov.uk/" rel="nofollow">Cyber Essentials</a>&nbsp;scheme. You can also share information, advice and intelligence about cyber risks online by joining our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/cisp" rel="nofollow">CISP community</a>.</p> <h4><strong>Reporting incidents involving personal data</strong></h4> <p>If you are affected by an incident which involves (or is likely to involve) a breach of personal data, then you are likely to have an obligation under the GDPR to notify the ICO. The ICO provide more detailed&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/personal-data-breaches" rel="nofollow">guidance</a>&nbsp;on their website about what constitutes a notifiable breach, preparing and responding to breaches.</p> <p>You may also wish to&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/reporting-cyber-security-incident" rel="nofollow">report significant cyber incidents</a>&nbsp;to the NCSC. If the incident is likely to have a national impact then we will seek to provide support, subject to resource constraints. National impact includes harm to national security, the economy, public confidence, or public health and safety. We would also welcome notification of incidents &lsquo;for information&rsquo; which you feel may be of interest, for example incidents which may contribute to our understanding of adversary activity, inform the guidance we provide, or help other organisations.</p> <p>Incidents below national threshold should be reported to&nbsp;<a href="https://www.actionfraud.police.uk/" rel="nofollow">Action Fraud</a>&nbsp;&ndash; the UK&rsquo;s national fraud and cyber crime reporting centre or, if you're in Scotland, then reports should be made to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.scotland.police.uk/contact-us/report-cybercrime" rel="nofollow">Police Scotland</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>The&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/" rel="nofollow">Information Commissioner&rsquo;s Office</a>&nbsp;(ICO) is the UK's supervisory authority for the GDPR and is responsible for promoting and enforcing the legislation, as well as providing advice and guidance to organisations and individuals. The ICO&nbsp;has published a lot of helpful guidance on&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/" rel="nofollow">its website</a>. This should be your first port of call for any overarching GDPR queries you might have.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/gdpr-security-outcomes" target="_blank">The GDPR Security Outcomes can be read here in full</a></p></div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><strong>What does the GDPR mean for cyber security?</strong></p> <p>The GDPR requires that personal data must be processed securely using appropriate technical and organisational measures.&nbsp;The Regulation does not mandate a specific set of cyber security measures but rather expects you to take &lsquo;appropriate&rsquo; action. In other words you need to&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/risk-management-collection" rel="nofollow">manage risk</a>. What is appropriate for you will depend upon your circumstances as well as the data you are processing and therefore the risks posed, however there is an expectation&nbsp;you have minimal, established security measures in place. The security measures must be designed into your systems at the outset (referred to as Privacy by Design) and maintained effective throughout the life of your system.</p> <p>The NCSC have worked with the ICO to develop a set of&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/gdpr-security-outcomes" rel="nofollow">GDPR Security Outcomes</a>. This guidance provides an overview of what the GDPR says about security and describes a set of security related outcomes that all organisations processing personal data should seek to achieve. The approach is based on four top level aims:</p> <ul><li>manage security risk</li> <li>protect personal data against cyber attack</li> <li>detect security events, and</li> <li>minimise the impact</li> </ul><p>A good starting point for advice on implementing security measures for the GDPR is existing good cyber security guidance. Some good sources of information include our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/10-steps-cyber-security" rel="nofollow">10 Steps to Cyber Security</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/smallbusiness" rel="nofollow">Small Business Guide</a>&nbsp;or the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.cyberessentials.ncsc.gov.uk/" rel="nofollow">Cyber Essentials</a>&nbsp;scheme. You can also share information, advice and intelligence about cyber risks online by joining our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/cisp" rel="nofollow">CISP community</a>.</p> <h4><strong>Reporting incidents involving personal data</strong></h4> <p>If you are affected by an incident which involves (or is likely to involve) a breach of personal data, then you are likely to have an obligation under the GDPR to notify the ICO. The ICO provide more detailed&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/personal-data-breaches" rel="nofollow">guidance</a>&nbsp;on their website about what constitutes a notifiable breach, preparing and responding to breaches.</p> <p>You may also wish to&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/reporting-cyber-security-incident" rel="nofollow">report significant cyber incidents</a>&nbsp;to the NCSC. If the incident is likely to have a national impact then we will seek to provide support, subject to resource constraints. National impact includes harm to national security, the economy, public confidence, or public health and safety. We would also welcome notification of incidents &lsquo;for information&rsquo; which you feel may be of interest, for example incidents which may contribute to our understanding of adversary activity, inform the guidance we provide, or help other organisations.</p> <p>Incidents below national threshold should be reported to&nbsp;<a href="https://www.actionfraud.police.uk/" rel="nofollow">Action Fraud</a>&nbsp;&ndash; the UK&rsquo;s national fraud and cyber crime reporting centre or, if you're in Scotland, then reports should be made to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.scotland.police.uk/contact-us/report-cybercrime" rel="nofollow">Police Scotland</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>The&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/" rel="nofollow">Information Commissioner&rsquo;s Office</a>&nbsp;(ICO) is the UK's supervisory authority for the GDPR and is responsible for promoting and enforcing the legislation, as well as providing advice and guidance to organisations and individuals. The ICO&nbsp;has published a lot of helpful guidance on&nbsp;<a href="https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/" rel="nofollow">its website</a>. This should be your first port of call for any overarching GDPR queries you might have.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/guidance/gdpr-security-outcomes" target="_blank">The GDPR Security Outcomes can be read here in full</a></p></div> The long-term impact of GDPR will be more than better data protection 2018-05-21T11:30:00+01:00 2018-05-21T11:30:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13137-the-long-term-impact-of-gdpr-will-be-more-than-better-data-protection CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Peter%20Wells%20ODI.jpg" style="float:left; height:400px; margin:5px; width:400px">GDPR is just around the corner, putting unprecedented focus on the protection of personal data. But its full long-term impact will be much wider. By giving people more control over data, GDPR will see the emergence of new classes of services and the need for stronger and more open data infrastructure.</p> <p>I don't need to explain what GDPR means. Many articles, blogposts and (re)marketing emails are doing that every day. But the current focus many have around GDPR is on things that have been going wrong, such as the failure to adequately protect personal data.</p> <p><strong>Focus on the intended outcome of legislation</strong></p> <p>There should be more emphasis on the intended outcome of the legislation: to put citizens first and give people more control over data about them. While all organisations are - quite rightly - responding to the legislation by improving their data compliance and governance procedures, the more forward-looking are already focusing on the new services that will emerge from it.</p> <p>At the Open Data Institute, we have been very interested in the potential created by the new right to data portability. If it is well-implemented, data portability opens up a new class of services that will help citizens and consumers make better decisions about things like their choice of mobile operator. Imagine a world where you could pick a new mobile operator, not just on price or whether they have the latest handset, but also on whether it provided a good signal strength on your journey to work or had a privacy policy that matched your needs.</p> <p>Services like this are enabled by a combination of data portability &ndash; to get access to the location data held by your current operator &ndash; and strong open data infrastructure about signal coverage and product information.</p> <p>Our investigations alongside IF &ndash; a specialist digital rights consultancy &ndash; have shown the potential of data portability. But they have also highlighted some challenges, such as how to handle the portability of data about multiple people.</p> <p><strong>Most users are groups of people, not individuals</strong></p> <p>Most services assume that their users are individuals, when often they are groups of people. This shouldn't be a surprise.</p> <p>Our societies are built on networks of relationships between humans. We live, work and use social media together. The new wave of services built around data portability will need to learn how to design for and handle data about multiple people. Consider the growth in shared households and the need for services that make it easy for each person to control the data they have rights to. They will make it easier for people to build up credit ratings or move to a new local authority area.</p> <p>We can see the early signs of these new services in the Open Banking movement. Open Banking gives consumers more control over data about their bank account but it also relies on strong and open data infrastructure about bank products, to promote switching, and about which services can use the Open Banking APIs, to protect consumers from bad actors. The services will support things like easier switching, better rates on financial products, or making it easier to manage multiple accounts.</p> <p>As we build these services we need to try and avoid the mistakes of the past that led to the need for regulators to intervene and whose effects we can see in the Facebook and Cambridge Analytica scandal.</p> <p><strong>Building ethical practices and better services</strong></p> <p>At ODI, we are helping organisations build ethical practices into their day-to-day activities, to engage with people and civil society about potential uses of data, and to spread the benefits that arise from using data equitably and fairly. Regulators also need to learn how to promote interoperability, monitor the market to spot harmful impacts as they start to emerge, and intervene more proactively to mitigate them.</p> <p>While the immediate focus of GDPR is necessarily on creating adequate data protection and compliance, we would encourage organisations both in the public and private sectors to look further to the future. By giving citizens and consumers more control over data and by building stronger and more open data infrastructure, we can create a new class of services that improve people's lives.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p><img alt="" src="//portal.techuk.org/uploaded-images/Peter%20Wells%20ODI.jpg" style="float:left; height:400px; margin:5px; width:400px">GDPR is just around the corner, putting unprecedented focus on the protection of personal data. But its full long-term impact will be much wider. By giving people more control over data, GDPR will see the emergence of new classes of services and the need for stronger and more open data infrastructure.</p> <p>I don't need to explain what GDPR means. Many articles, blogposts and (re)marketing emails are doing that every day. But the current focus many have around GDPR is on things that have been going wrong, such as the failure to adequately protect personal data.</p> <p><strong>Focus on the intended outcome of legislation</strong></p> <p>There should be more emphasis on the intended outcome of the legislation: to put citizens first and give people more control over data about them. While all organisations are - quite rightly - responding to the legislation by improving their data compliance and governance procedures, the more forward-looking are already focusing on the new services that will emerge from it.</p> <p>At the Open Data Institute, we have been very interested in the potential created by the new right to data portability. If it is well-implemented, data portability opens up a new class of services that will help citizens and consumers make better decisions about things like their choice of mobile operator. Imagine a world where you could pick a new mobile operator, not just on price or whether they have the latest handset, but also on whether it provided a good signal strength on your journey to work or had a privacy policy that matched your needs.</p> <p>Services like this are enabled by a combination of data portability &ndash; to get access to the location data held by your current operator &ndash; and strong open data infrastructure about signal coverage and product information.</p> <p>Our investigations alongside IF &ndash; a specialist digital rights consultancy &ndash; have shown the potential of data portability. But they have also highlighted some challenges, such as how to handle the portability of data about multiple people.</p> <p><strong>Most users are groups of people, not individuals</strong></p> <p>Most services assume that their users are individuals, when often they are groups of people. This shouldn't be a surprise.</p> <p>Our societies are built on networks of relationships between humans. We live, work and use social media together. The new wave of services built around data portability will need to learn how to design for and handle data about multiple people. Consider the growth in shared households and the need for services that make it easy for each person to control the data they have rights to. They will make it easier for people to build up credit ratings or move to a new local authority area.</p> <p>We can see the early signs of these new services in the Open Banking movement. Open Banking gives consumers more control over data about their bank account but it also relies on strong and open data infrastructure about bank products, to promote switching, and about which services can use the Open Banking APIs, to protect consumers from bad actors. The services will support things like easier switching, better rates on financial products, or making it easier to manage multiple accounts.</p> <p>As we build these services we need to try and avoid the mistakes of the past that led to the need for regulators to intervene and whose effects we can see in the Facebook and Cambridge Analytica scandal.</p> <p><strong>Building ethical practices and better services</strong></p> <p>At ODI, we are helping organisations build ethical practices into their day-to-day activities, to engage with people and civil society about potential uses of data, and to spread the benefits that arise from using data equitably and fairly. Regulators also need to learn how to promote interoperability, monitor the market to spot harmful impacts as they start to emerge, and intervene more proactively to mitigate them.</p> <p>While the immediate focus of GDPR is necessarily on creating adequate data protection and compliance, we would encourage organisations both in the public and private sectors to look further to the future. By giving citizens and consumers more control over data and by building stronger and more open data infrastructure, we can create a new class of services that improve people's lives.</p> <p><a href="https://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13125-welcome-to-techuk-s-data-protection-campaign-week"><span style="color:#0000FF"><em>For more from techUK Data Protection Week, visit our landing page.</em></span></a></p>{bio}jeremy.lilley@techuk.org{/bio}</div> ‘Open’ season for cyber-crime in financial services 2018-05-18T14:31:39+01:00 2018-05-18T14:31:39+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/opinions/item/13136-open-season-for-cyber-crime-in-financial-services CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Lloyds estimates that Cyber costs over $3.5bnn globally and the touch points and potentiality for cyber-crime continue to rise. Cyber has been an increasing area of focus for our financial services and payments programme at techUK.&nbsp; Odds of data breach are 1 on 4 according to the Poneneon Institute&rsquo;s 2017 <em>global cost of data breach</em> study. In the UK, ONS statistics show that fraud and cyber-crime make up nearly 50% of all crime. 66% of UK SMEs have now suffered a cyber breach. The total cost data of breaches in the UK rose by 14.5% from $3.45m in 2014 to $3.95m in 2016. Whilst, cyber insurance is increasing 13.7% in 2016, cf 2.1% in 2014 it is still materially inadequate.</p> <p><em>Open Banking </em></p> <p>The implementation of the Open Banking reforms and revised Payments Services Directive (PSD2), which harmonises payments regulation across Europe opens up the financial marketplace and ecosystem to new types of participants, Third Party Providers (TPPs), both Payment Initiation Services Providers (PISPs) and Account Information Services Providers (AISPs). These TPPs now have the right to access banks open source APIs to access customer transaction data for the first time and offer new services to consumers.</p> <p>Although, regulation has strengthened security and customer authentication requirements to support the PSD2/Open Banking reforms &ndash; the expansion of the ecosystem, currently being exploited by new fintech and other challenger offerings, also creates an expanded interface of touch base and increases the potential for cybercrime.</p> <p><em>Cyber risk management </em></p> <p>Financial services is particularly poor at managing cyber risks -cloud management, data assets privacy/information/storage transfer methods, disaster and business recovery, network intrusion, malware/traffic attacks, security policy, privacy policy, encryption, antivirus and firewall security etc. There is also poor exposure and claims history data available resulting in poor cyber-risk pricing models capital management. Hence, cyberinsurance is poorly developed whilst &lsquo;silent&rsquo; or &lsquo;non-affirmative&rsquo; incidental cyber risk claims rise. This means insurers are exposed to significant and increasing cumulative risk from cyber incidents and the insured now paying larger premium amounts as well.</p> <p>The introduction of GDPR from Friday 25 May and the increasing spotlight on data ethics - compounded by the Cambridge Analytica scandal - makes data privacy/assets controls and management vital too.</p> <p>FS must get a handle on combating cybercrime and ensuring adequate risk cover, soon!</p>{bio}Melanie.Worthy@techUK.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>Lloyds estimates that Cyber costs over $3.5bnn globally and the touch points and potentiality for cyber-crime continue to rise. Cyber has been an increasing area of focus for our financial services and payments programme at techUK.&nbsp; Odds of data breach are 1 on 4 according to the Poneneon Institute&rsquo;s 2017 <em>global cost of data breach</em> study. In the UK, ONS statistics show that fraud and cyber-crime make up nearly 50% of all crime. 66% of UK SMEs have now suffered a cyber breach. The total cost data of breaches in the UK rose by 14.5% from $3.45m in 2014 to $3.95m in 2016. Whilst, cyber insurance is increasing 13.7% in 2016, cf 2.1% in 2014 it is still materially inadequate.</p> <p><em>Open Banking </em></p> <p>The implementation of the Open Banking reforms and revised Payments Services Directive (PSD2), which harmonises payments regulation across Europe opens up the financial marketplace and ecosystem to new types of participants, Third Party Providers (TPPs), both Payment Initiation Services Providers (PISPs) and Account Information Services Providers (AISPs). These TPPs now have the right to access banks open source APIs to access customer transaction data for the first time and offer new services to consumers.</p> <p>Although, regulation has strengthened security and customer authentication requirements to support the PSD2/Open Banking reforms &ndash; the expansion of the ecosystem, currently being exploited by new fintech and other challenger offerings, also creates an expanded interface of touch base and increases the potential for cybercrime.</p> <p><em>Cyber risk management </em></p> <p>Financial services is particularly poor at managing cyber risks -cloud management, data assets privacy/information/storage transfer methods, disaster and business recovery, network intrusion, malware/traffic attacks, security policy, privacy policy, encryption, antivirus and firewall security etc. There is also poor exposure and claims history data available resulting in poor cyber-risk pricing models capital management. Hence, cyberinsurance is poorly developed whilst &lsquo;silent&rsquo; or &lsquo;non-affirmative&rsquo; incidental cyber risk claims rise. This means insurers are exposed to significant and increasing cumulative risk from cyber incidents and the insured now paying larger premium amounts as well.</p> <p>The introduction of GDPR from Friday 25 May and the increasing spotlight on data ethics - compounded by the Cambridge Analytica scandal - makes data privacy/assets controls and management vital too.</p> <p>FS must get a handle on combating cybercrime and ensuring adequate risk cover, soon!</p>{bio}Melanie.Worthy@techUK.org{/bio}</div> Digital Policing Review: Technology Futures Operations 2018-05-18T13:52:23+01:00 2018-05-18T13:52:23+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/news/item/13135-digital-policing-review-technology-futures-operations CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>As part of the Digital Policing Review, Vigilant Research has published a report on <strong>Technology Futures&nbsp;Operations</strong>. This research was proposed by the National Police Technology Council, and it examines the current state and resourcing of technology futures operations within the UK police service, considers operating models for the capability within comparable businesses and the technology industry, categorises and sets out policing&rsquo;s technology futures requirements, reviews the external sources of technology futures insight and proposes appropriate objectives for a centralised police technology futures capability.</p> <p>The paper confirms that the service has much to gain from technology futures insight which is shaped by the police technology community and suggests some proposals for improving capability by harmonizing operations to which technology futures activities are well suited.</p> <p>If techUK members would like a complimentary copy of the report from Vigilant Research, please contact <a href="mailto:henry.rex@techuk.org?subject=DPR%20Technology%20Futures%20Report" target="_blank">Henry Rex</a>.</p>{bio}henry.rex@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>As part of the Digital Policing Review, Vigilant Research has published a report on <strong>Technology Futures&nbsp;Operations</strong>. This research was proposed by the National Police Technology Council, and it examines the current state and resourcing of technology futures operations within the UK police service, considers operating models for the capability within comparable businesses and the technology industry, categorises and sets out policing&rsquo;s technology futures requirements, reviews the external sources of technology futures insight and proposes appropriate objectives for a centralised police technology futures capability.</p> <p>The paper confirms that the service has much to gain from technology futures insight which is shaped by the police technology community and suggests some proposals for improving capability by harmonizing operations to which technology futures activities are well suited.</p> <p>If techUK members would like a complimentary copy of the report from Vigilant Research, please contact <a href="mailto:henry.rex@techuk.org?subject=DPR%20Technology%20Futures%20Report" target="_blank">Henry Rex</a>.</p>{bio}henry.rex@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Product Technical Policy and Standards Group 2017-02-22T07:00:00+00:00 2017-02-22T07:00:00+00:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/meeting-notes/item/13134-product-technical-policy-and-standards-group CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p title="" data-original-title="">The Product Technical Policy and Standards Group (PTPS) covers electro-technical policies affecting products as well as the standards manufacturers must comply with before tech goods can be sold in the UK.</p> <p title="" data-original-title="">Currently the PTPS is focused on understanding what Brexit means for physical goods, conformity assessments and its impact on design requirements. It is campaigning to keep the UK within CE marking and membership of the European Standardization organisations. The group also lobbies on the details of specific legislation such as the Radio Equipment, Low Voltage and Electromagnetic Compatibility Directives.</p> <p title="" data-original-title="">The PTPS also works with the BSI and sits on numerous UK and international CEN, CENELEC, IEC, ISO and IEEE standards committees and updates members on standards in development. The PTPS engages with BEIS, other industry fora (including Digital Europe) and Market Surveillance Authorities on product compliance.</p> <p title="" data-original-title="">The PTPS is open to all members, but is mainly for those manufacturing physical goods</p>{bio}lucas.banach@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p title="" data-original-title="">The Product Technical Policy and Standards Group (PTPS) covers electro-technical policies affecting products as well as the standards manufacturers must comply with before tech goods can be sold in the UK.</p> <p title="" data-original-title="">Currently the PTPS is focused on understanding what Brexit means for physical goods, conformity assessments and its impact on design requirements. It is campaigning to keep the UK within CE marking and membership of the European Standardization organisations. The group also lobbies on the details of specific legislation such as the Radio Equipment, Low Voltage and Electromagnetic Compatibility Directives.</p> <p title="" data-original-title="">The PTPS also works with the BSI and sits on numerous UK and international CEN, CENELEC, IEC, ISO and IEEE standards committees and updates members on standards in development. The PTPS engages with BEIS, other industry fora (including Digital Europe) and Market Surveillance Authorities on product compliance.</p> <p title="" data-original-title="">The PTPS is open to all members, but is mainly for those manufacturing physical goods</p>{bio}lucas.banach@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Health & Social Care Newsletter - May 2018-05-15T13:48:00+01:00 2018-05-15T13:48:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/newsletters/item/13133-health-social-care-newsletter-may CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>We've had another packed month of events at techUK, including <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/435A9925/052018n" target="_blank">NHS Jobs</a>, <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/7368706F/052018n" target="_blank">partnering and networking</a>, <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/6F1CAC5A/052018n" target="_blank">NHS Digital Industry Briefings</a> and <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/CA4DCE2A/052018n" target="_blank">Urgent and Emergency Care Clinical Triage Platform Webinars</a>&nbsp;and more. Read on for more details.<br><br> Next month we will co-host an&nbsp;<a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/F0A60EAF/052018n" target="_blank">event with Rachel Dunscombe, CEO of the NHS Digital Academy</a>&nbsp;to see how industry can be involved with creating the next generation of health tech leaders.&nbsp;<br><br> techUK members are entitled to receive preferential rates for&nbsp;NHS Confed18, <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/B7BF0A2/052018n" target="_blank">read on for more information</a>.<br><br> With a busy&nbsp;programme for 2018 we've resurrected our Events and Opportunities mailers. These will be sent out where necessary in addition to our monthly newsletters. They are separate mailing lists so do manage your preferences below if you think you might be missing out.</p> <p><strong>#HSCtechUK&nbsp;events</strong></p> <p><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/33295E5F/052018n" target="_blank">London Tech Week Event: How to Sell into the UK Public Sector</a><br> 12 June, 16:30 - 19:00<br> Join us for a seminar to learn how to navigate the UK Government&rsquo;s technology procurement processes. This event is part of London Tech Week and will provide those in attendance the opportunity to understand how UK Government procurement works, what the opportunities are, how to overcome the challenges and tips on how to secure business.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/DF04CC9F/052018n" target="_blank">Co-Creating the Future: NHS Digital Academy &ndash; Industry Engagement</a><br> 18 June, 15:00 - 17:30<br> This event will showcase the NHS Digital Academy, its work thus far and plans for the future. It will include a workshop under Chatham House Rule to discuss how stakeholders from the health and social care ecosystem can be involved in the future of the academy and support the development of the academy going forward.<br><br><strong>#HSCtechUK&nbsp;news and meeting notes</strong></p> <p><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/C1BD2F2A/052018n" target="_blank">techUK fosters the health and social care ecosystem</a><br> Pitching, partnering and networking was the order of the day at the Health and Social Care Programme&rsquo;s inaugural&nbsp;Fostering the Health and Social Care Ecosystem event.&nbsp;<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/C11C1AB0/052018n" target="_blank">How technology can help Europe's biggest employer</a><br> techUK is working on the future of NHS Jobs. Read about our event with the NHS Business Services Authority and Difrent.&nbsp;<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/7126DF49/052018n" target="_blank">The future of digital health in the NHS</a><br> techUK and Portland brought together panelists from NHS England and industry to discuss how best to drive the uptake of technological innovation in the NHS.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/886E92D3/052018n" target="_blank">Mental Health Awareness Week</a><br> This guest blog by Mental Health at Work talks about breaking the culture of silence around mental ill health at work.</p> <p><strong>News and opportunities from friends and stakeholders</strong></p> <p><img id="_x0000_i1025" src="http://files-eu.clickdimensions.com/techukorg-a6ncz/files/email-banner-confed-2018.jpg" style="height:94px; width:564px"></p> <p><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/BD08BC40/052018n" target="_blank">NHS Confed,&nbsp;13, 14 June 2018</a><br> The NHS Confederation&rsquo;s flagship annual conference and exhibition is a high profile and influential platform for discussion. It brings together the whole health and social care community, strengthening relationships and showcasing innovative solutions to meet the changing needs of organisations across the healthcare sector.<br><br> As part of your techUK membership, we have negotiated preferential rates with the NHS Confederation for our members to attend.&nbsp;The NHS Confederation are offering members a saving of over &pound;500 on a 2-day delegate ticket, as well as preferential rates on exhibition costs.&nbsp;<a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/780FF9FD/052018n" target="_blank">Find out more.</a><br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/2A6EA161/052018n" target="_blank">NHS Digital innovative&nbsp;uses of data questionnaire</a><br> NHS Digital's&nbsp;Innovative Uses of Data service team would like to seek your input in helping shape the development of our analytics portal.<br><br> The team are currently developing a suite of baseline analytical visualisation products and tools that are being used to support the planning, delivery and evaluation of care across a variety of sectors.<br><br> If you think that your organisation might be interested, please complete the short survey on the <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/1CBA5CF3/052018n" target="_blank">industry platform.</a>&nbsp;The deadline for responses is 14 June 2018.</p>{bio}ben.moody@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>We've had another packed month of events at techUK, including <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/435A9925/052018n" target="_blank">NHS Jobs</a>, <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/7368706F/052018n" target="_blank">partnering and networking</a>, <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/6F1CAC5A/052018n" target="_blank">NHS Digital Industry Briefings</a> and <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/CA4DCE2A/052018n" target="_blank">Urgent and Emergency Care Clinical Triage Platform Webinars</a>&nbsp;and more. Read on for more details.<br><br> Next month we will co-host an&nbsp;<a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/F0A60EAF/052018n" target="_blank">event with Rachel Dunscombe, CEO of the NHS Digital Academy</a>&nbsp;to see how industry can be involved with creating the next generation of health tech leaders.&nbsp;<br><br> techUK members are entitled to receive preferential rates for&nbsp;NHS Confed18, <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/B7BF0A2/052018n" target="_blank">read on for more information</a>.<br><br> With a busy&nbsp;programme for 2018 we've resurrected our Events and Opportunities mailers. These will be sent out where necessary in addition to our monthly newsletters. They are separate mailing lists so do manage your preferences below if you think you might be missing out.</p> <p><strong>#HSCtechUK&nbsp;events</strong></p> <p><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/33295E5F/052018n" target="_blank">London Tech Week Event: How to Sell into the UK Public Sector</a><br> 12 June, 16:30 - 19:00<br> Join us for a seminar to learn how to navigate the UK Government&rsquo;s technology procurement processes. This event is part of London Tech Week and will provide those in attendance the opportunity to understand how UK Government procurement works, what the opportunities are, how to overcome the challenges and tips on how to secure business.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/DF04CC9F/052018n" target="_blank">Co-Creating the Future: NHS Digital Academy &ndash; Industry Engagement</a><br> 18 June, 15:00 - 17:30<br> This event will showcase the NHS Digital Academy, its work thus far and plans for the future. It will include a workshop under Chatham House Rule to discuss how stakeholders from the health and social care ecosystem can be involved in the future of the academy and support the development of the academy going forward.<br><br><strong>#HSCtechUK&nbsp;news and meeting notes</strong></p> <p><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/C1BD2F2A/052018n" target="_blank">techUK fosters the health and social care ecosystem</a><br> Pitching, partnering and networking was the order of the day at the Health and Social Care Programme&rsquo;s inaugural&nbsp;Fostering the Health and Social Care Ecosystem event.&nbsp;<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/C11C1AB0/052018n" target="_blank">How technology can help Europe's biggest employer</a><br> techUK is working on the future of NHS Jobs. Read about our event with the NHS Business Services Authority and Difrent.&nbsp;<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/7126DF49/052018n" target="_blank">The future of digital health in the NHS</a><br> techUK and Portland brought together panelists from NHS England and industry to discuss how best to drive the uptake of technological innovation in the NHS.<br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/886E92D3/052018n" target="_blank">Mental Health Awareness Week</a><br> This guest blog by Mental Health at Work talks about breaking the culture of silence around mental ill health at work.</p> <p><strong>News and opportunities from friends and stakeholders</strong></p> <p><img id="_x0000_i1025" src="http://files-eu.clickdimensions.com/techukorg-a6ncz/files/email-banner-confed-2018.jpg" style="height:94px; width:564px"></p> <p><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/BD08BC40/052018n" target="_blank">NHS Confed,&nbsp;13, 14 June 2018</a><br> The NHS Confederation&rsquo;s flagship annual conference and exhibition is a high profile and influential platform for discussion. It brings together the whole health and social care community, strengthening relationships and showcasing innovative solutions to meet the changing needs of organisations across the healthcare sector.<br><br> As part of your techUK membership, we have negotiated preferential rates with the NHS Confederation for our members to attend.&nbsp;The NHS Confederation are offering members a saving of over &pound;500 on a 2-day delegate ticket, as well as preferential rates on exhibition costs.&nbsp;<a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/780FF9FD/052018n" target="_blank">Find out more.</a><br><br><a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/2A6EA161/052018n" target="_blank">NHS Digital innovative&nbsp;uses of data questionnaire</a><br> NHS Digital's&nbsp;Innovative Uses of Data service team would like to seek your input in helping shape the development of our analytics portal.<br><br> The team are currently developing a suite of baseline analytical visualisation products and tools that are being used to support the planning, delivery and evaluation of care across a variety of sectors.<br><br> If you think that your organisation might be interested, please complete the short survey on the <a href="http://link.techuk.org/l/597c46f3a5574696b2726921915e59ea/107B3994/1CBA5CF3/052018n" target="_blank">industry platform.</a>&nbsp;The deadline for responses is 14 June 2018.</p>{bio}ben.moody@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Sustainable Supply Chain Group 2017-09-05T08:00:00+01:00 2017-09-05T08:00:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/meeting-notes/item/13132-sustainable-supply-chain-group CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The Sustainable Supply Chain Group (SSG) brings together sustainability, materials and environmental experts from across the wide techUK membership and focuses on issues affecting the wider supply chain, both up and down stream.</p> <p>This includes the requirements of the RoHS Directive, REACH (the EU flagship chemicals legislation), modern slavery and human rights, sustainable development and responsible mineral sourcing. Meetings also hear from leading NGOs, government and international officials.</p> <p>The SSG discussions focus on the interpretation and understanding of current requirements as they evolve and shaping new policy under consideration by the UK Government, the EU, UN, OECD as well as participating in international pan industry efforts.</p> <p>The SSG is open to all members.</p>{bio}lucas.banach@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The Sustainable Supply Chain Group (SSG) brings together sustainability, materials and environmental experts from across the wide techUK membership and focuses on issues affecting the wider supply chain, both up and down stream.</p> <p>This includes the requirements of the RoHS Directive, REACH (the EU flagship chemicals legislation), modern slavery and human rights, sustainable development and responsible mineral sourcing. Meetings also hear from leading NGOs, government and international officials.</p> <p>The SSG discussions focus on the interpretation and understanding of current requirements as they evolve and shaping new policy under consideration by the UK Government, the EU, UN, OECD as well as participating in international pan industry efforts.</p> <p>The SSG is open to all members.</p>{bio}lucas.banach@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Sustainable Supply Chain Group 2017-05-16T08:00:00+01:00 2017-05-16T08:00:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/meeting-notes/item/13131-sustainable-supply-chain-group CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The Sustainable Supply Chain Group (SSG) brings together sustainability, materials and environmental experts from across the wide techUK membership and focuses on issues affecting the wider supply chain, both up and down stream.</p> <p>This includes the requirements of the RoHS Directive, REACH (the EU flagship chemicals legislation), modern slavery and human rights, sustainable development and responsible mineral sourcing. Meetings also hear from leading NGOs, government and international officials.</p> <p>The SSG discussions focus on the interpretation and understanding of current requirements as they evolve and shaping new policy under consideration by the UK Government, the EU, UN, OECD as well as participating in international pan industry efforts.</p> <p>The SSG is open to all members.</p>{bio}lucas.banach@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The Sustainable Supply Chain Group (SSG) brings together sustainability, materials and environmental experts from across the wide techUK membership and focuses on issues affecting the wider supply chain, both up and down stream.</p> <p>This includes the requirements of the RoHS Directive, REACH (the EU flagship chemicals legislation), modern slavery and human rights, sustainable development and responsible mineral sourcing. Meetings also hear from leading NGOs, government and international officials.</p> <p>The SSG discussions focus on the interpretation and understanding of current requirements as they evolve and shaping new policy under consideration by the UK Government, the EU, UN, OECD as well as participating in international pan industry efforts.</p> <p>The SSG is open to all members.</p>{bio}lucas.banach@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Sustainable Supply Chain Group 2017-02-09T07:00:00+00:00 2017-02-09T07:00:00+00:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/meeting-notes/item/13130-sustainable-supply-chain-group CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The Sustainable Supply Chain Group (SSG) brings together sustainability, materials and environmental experts from across the wide techUK membership and focuses on issues affecting the wider supply chain, both up and down stream.</p> <p>This includes the requirements of the RoHS Directive, REACH (the EU flagship chemicals legislation), modern slavery and human rights, sustainable development and responsible mineral sourcing. Meetings also hear from leading NGOs, government and international officials.</p> <p>The SSG discussions focus on the interpretation and understanding of current requirements as they evolve and shaping new policy under consideration by the UK Government, the EU, UN, OECD as well as participating in international pan industry efforts.</p> <p>The SSG is open to all members.</p>{bio}lucas.banach@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The Sustainable Supply Chain Group (SSG) brings together sustainability, materials and environmental experts from across the wide techUK membership and focuses on issues affecting the wider supply chain, both up and down stream.</p> <p>This includes the requirements of the RoHS Directive, REACH (the EU flagship chemicals legislation), modern slavery and human rights, sustainable development and responsible mineral sourcing. Meetings also hear from leading NGOs, government and international officials.</p> <p>The SSG discussions focus on the interpretation and understanding of current requirements as they evolve and shaping new policy under consideration by the UK Government, the EU, UN, OECD as well as participating in international pan industry efforts.</p> <p>The SSG is open to all members.</p>{bio}lucas.banach@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Sustainable Supply Chain Group 2018-05-15T08:00:00+01:00 2018-05-15T08:00:00+01:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/meeting-notes/item/13129-sustainable-supply-chain-group CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The Sustainable Supply Chain Group (SSG) brings together sustainability, materials and environmental experts from across the wide techUK membership and focuses on issues affecting the wider supply chain, both up and down stream.</p> <p>This includes the requirements of the RoHS Directive, REACH (the EU flagship chemicals legislation), modern slavery and human rights, sustainable development and responsible mineral sourcing. Meetings also hear from leading NGOs, government and international officials.</p> <p>The SSG discussions focus on the interpretation and understanding of current requirements as they evolve and shaping new policy under consideration by the UK Government, the EU, UN, OECD as well as participating in international pan industry efforts.</p> <p>The SSG is open to all members.</p>{bio}lucas.banach@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The Sustainable Supply Chain Group (SSG) brings together sustainability, materials and environmental experts from across the wide techUK membership and focuses on issues affecting the wider supply chain, both up and down stream.</p> <p>This includes the requirements of the RoHS Directive, REACH (the EU flagship chemicals legislation), modern slavery and human rights, sustainable development and responsible mineral sourcing. Meetings also hear from leading NGOs, government and international officials.</p> <p>The SSG discussions focus on the interpretation and understanding of current requirements as they evolve and shaping new policy under consideration by the UK Government, the EU, UN, OECD as well as participating in international pan industry efforts.</p> <p>The SSG is open to all members.</p>{bio}lucas.banach@techuk.org{/bio}</div> Sustainable Supply Chain Group 2018-02-07T07:00:00+00:00 2018-02-07T07:00:00+00:00 http://www.techuk.org/insights/meeting-notes/item/13128-sustainable-supply-chain-group CRM Sync noreply@techuk.org <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The Sustainable Supply Chain Group (SSG) brings together sustainability, materials and environmental experts from across the wide techUK membership and focuses on issues affecting the wider supply chain, both up and down stream.</p> <p>This includes the requirements of the RoHS Directive, REACH (the EU flagship chemicals legislation), modern slavery and human rights, sustainable development and responsible mineral sourcing. Meetings also hear from leading NGOs, government and international officials.</p> <p>The SSG discussions focus on the interpretation and understanding of current requirements as they evolve and shaping new policy under consideration by the UK Government, the EU, UN, OECD as well as participating in international pan industry efforts.</p> <p>The SSG is open to all members.</p>{bio}lucas.banach@techuk.org{/bio}</div> <div class="K2FeedIntroText"><p>The Sustainable Supply Chain Group (SSG) brings together sustainability, materials and environmental experts from across the wide techUK membership and focuses on issues affecting the wider supply chain, both up and down stream.</p> <p>This includes the requirements of the RoHS Directive, REACH (the EU flagship chemicals legislation), modern slavery and human rights, sustainable development and responsible mineral sourcing. Meetings also hear from leading NGOs, government and international officials.</p> <p>The SSG discussions focus on the interpretation and understanding of current requirements as they evolve and shaping new policy under consideration by the UK Government, the EU, UN, OECD as well as participating in international pan industry efforts.</p> <p>The SSG is open to all members.</p>{bio}lucas.banach@techuk.org{/bio}</div>